Quixotic
SHARE THIS PAGE View Viral Dashboard ›
    • Quixotic

      I think the difference is that you know your friend and they’re obviously interested in sharing stories and information with you. I think the problem being described here is more people taking for granted that it’s okay to question people, or making assumptions based on stereotypes. For example, I don’t think there’d be anything wrong with asking your friend (who’s shown a willingness to discuss her culture) about her tribe’s spiritual beliefs and whether they have shamans. But assuming that a Native person knows shamans and can give you their names is really presumptuous on multiple levels.

    • Response to “I’m A Guy”:
      Quixotic

      It’s nice to see this perspective. It can be very difficult to quantify what it means to be a certain gender, or express that gender, when neither your physical sex nor your outward expression neatly match. As someone who also doesn’t plan to transition, or at least not transition enough to be able to pass, it can be hard to feel genuine sometimes. It can also be difficult to reconcile what feels right to me, personally, with what I would need to do to be able to pass. I know I won’t pass unless I start hormones, and that can be a difficult thing to deal with sometimes. It’s always great to see someone find love and be true to themselves despite the difficulties.

    • Quixotic

      If you’re a friend, then hopefully you know the person well enough to have an idea of what types of things they’d be comfortable discussing with you, and will respect their boundaries. Some friends are comfortable talking about their genitals with each other and some aren’t, for example. And hopefully you will respect your friend enough to try to avoid insulting them. These questions are things that are either totally inappropriate to ask out of the blue (like the penis question) or are phrased in hurtful ways (like asking someone what their “real” name is). Hopefully, with a friend, you would have an idea of whether they’d be comfortable discussing their body with you. And you’ll know that the name they go by is their real name.

Show More Activity