skiinggnat
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    • skiinggnat

      Go to a reputable running store and get professionally fitted for running shoes. The shoes you run in should be slightly larger than your normal shoe size, because after extended periods of running, your feet will swell. If you’re wearing your normal size, you run the risk of doing damage to your toenails- and potentially losing them later, like I did following my first half marathon- from the tips of your toes repeatedly bashing against the fronts of your shoes.

    • skiinggnat

      When you cross the starting line, surrounded by people totally PUMPED to be there, possibly with upbeat music playing on speakers all around you, with people on the sidelines cheering loudly, you will be suffused with an intoxicating burst of energy. You will feel, for a moment, as though anything is possible. You will, quite possibly, be tempted to let that feeling push you to run harder, to achieve a faster first mile than you ever have before, to keep pace with runners who are faster than you are (especially if you’re D-corral slowpoke like me). DO NOT GIVE IN TO THESE URGES. IT’S A TRAP. Just run at the pace you’ve trained at, the pace you KNOW works for you, and instead of burning out by Mile 3 and limping through the rest of it, you’ll be rewarded with the same feeling that you had at the starting line, multiplied tenfold, when you cross the finish.

    • skiinggnat

      This year, I discovered Lush hair care products- specifically, Rehab Shampoo and Happy Happy Joy Joy Conditioner. I have thick but fine hair, frizzy beyond managing on the least humid of days (and I live in a very humid area), and I had tried every smoothing serum on the market, including some seriously expensive ones, without success. But with this stuff, I wash it, dry it, run my flat iron over it once or twice, and it’s smooth and shiny for the rest of the day, even when it’s rainy.

    • skiinggnat

      On my 20th birthday, my friends handed me an Altoids tin full of weed and a pipe, and told me to “keep re-filling until I felt it.” An hour later, I was telling an in-depth story about how, in a past life, I co-owned a food truck with my brother, but I was only allowed to touch the pre-packaged foods like Doritos, because I was “unclean.” I further explained that what made me unclean was that, every half hour, my intestines would burst out the top of my head, then retract and return to their rightful place. Later, we trekked down the road to 7-11 for some munchies. I kept wandering aimlessly up and down the aisles, until finally, one of my friends asked me what I was looking for. I very plaintively replied, “My rocking chair. I want to sit down.”

    • skiinggnat

      Small-breasted = possible psychological problems. Large-breasted = possible psychological problems, scads of practical problems (clothes shopping, bra affordability, exercise restrictions), plus a myriad of physical problems that can include (but are certainly not limited to): back, neck, and shoulder pain, poor posture (often ending, for elderly women, with a super-attractive huchback), shoulder grooving (a great thing where your bra straps, over time, actually create canyons in your collarbone), and frequent fungal and bacterial infections (because those folds get super sweaty). All of those things can add up to a much bigger problem than just insecurity.

    • skiinggnat

      My family had very little money when my dad applied for his first overseas assignment. My best friend’s family moved overseas asalast resort when it looked like the only way her dad could possibly continue in his job. Many friends and former classmates had parents who left their home country to escape lack of opportunity. The bulk ofaTCK’s experience with other cultures does not come from traveling for pleasure, which DOES cost money. It comes fromarelocation that’s generally financed by the TCK’s father’s or mother’s employer, not by their personal wealth. Iunderstand that traveling the world does takealot of money; I’m not sure how it’s not humble to point out that beingaTCK doesn’t always mean that you’re also financially wealthy. Rich in experience, absolutely, and privileged to have seen so much of the world, beyondadoubt. But just plain rich? Considerably less often than you’d think.

    • skiinggnat

      Newsflash: lots of TCK’s are not, in fact, rich, and neither are their parents. Some are military brats, and most of the rest of us hadafather or mother who tookachance and applied foraprofessional position outside of their home country. We’re the children of engineers, teachers, and foreign service members, NOT the children of billionaire business moguls and celebrities, and in most cases, much of our existence overseas was financed by our parent’s employers, because many companies recognize that moving your entire family toastrange country isabig risk, and they compensate accordingly. So maybe instead of being bitter, you should look into what fields haveahigh demand for expatriate employees, and tailor your career accordingly.

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