back to top

17 Iconic "The Flash" Covers That Fans Of The TV Show Should Own

CW's television adaptation of The Flash has already garnered massive ratings and a full-season order. If you're a fan of the television show and want to check out the comics, here's some covers you MUST own before they speed off the shelves. (Sorry, not sorry for that pun.)

Posted on

Warning: Will include spoilers for the comic series that may or may not appear on future television episodes.

1. Showcase #8, "Mystery of the Human Thunderbolt / The Man Who Broke the Time Barrier" (October 1956)

coverbrowser.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Kubert (Inks)

Writers: John Broome & Robert Kanigher

Why it's iconic: Known as the issue that created the Silver Age of Comics, DC took The Flash from the '40s and revived him as Barry Allen, a forensic scientist in Central City. This version of The Flash is the one portrayed by Grant Gustin in The CW's The Flash.

Retail Value: $52,000

Advertisement

2. The Flash #110, "Challenge of The Weather Wizard!" (January 1960)

comicvine.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it's iconic: This issue introduces The Weather Wizard, one of the better known members of The Flash's rogues gallery. The Weather Wizard made an appearance in the pilot of The Flash but he was shot and killed. Or was he...?

The episode also introduces Wally West as Kid Flash, who would eventually become the third person to wear the mask of The Flash.

Retail Value: $26,000

3. The Flash #127, "Reign of the Super-Gorilla!" (March 1962)

comicvine.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it's iconic: This isn't Gorilla Grodd's first appearance, but it's his first cover. And the sight of a super-intelligent gorilla is such an insane thing that only DC comics could've pulled off in the '60s.

Retail Value: $360

4. The Flash #123 "Flash of Two Worlds!" (September 1961)

coverbrowser.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: Gardner Fox

Why it's iconic: This is the first Silver Age appearance of the original Flash and the first mention of Earth-2 (where all the Bronze Age heroes live). Also, they look dope as hell sharing a cover together.

Retail Value: $5,000

5. The Flash #133, "Plight of the Puppet-Flash!" (December 1962)

comicvine.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it's iconic: This is admittedly a stupid story where The Flash is humiliated by Abra Kadabra parodying him in a puppet show (the 1960s version of being mocked on Twitter) and then gets turned INTO a puppet himself. But the cover art is awesome.

Retail Value: $300

6. The Flash #139, "Menace of the Reverse-Flash!" (September 1963)

comicvine.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it's iconic: This episode is the introduction of Reverse-Flash, otherwise known as Professor Zoom, Barry Allen's arch-nemesis. In the comics he's responsible for the murder of Barry's mother and eventually his wife, Iris West. We caught a glimpse of the Reverse-Flash murdering Barry's mother in the television show pilot, so does that mean Iris is doomed to that fate as well?

Retail Value: $900

Advertisement

7. The Flash #140, "The Heat Is On... For Captain Cold!" (November 1963)

comicvine.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it’s iconic: The first of the team-ups between Captain Cold and Heatwave, two of The Flash's iconic villains. They've already been casting for the CW show with Wentworth Miller and Dominic Purcell respectively, so it won't be long until The Flash has another chance to kick some ice.

Retail Value: $300

8. The Flash #163, "The Flash Stakes His Life On -- YOU!" (August 1966)

goodcomics.comicbookresources.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it’s iconic: This cover screams 1960s pop art and was reportedly the favorite comic book cover EVER of legendary DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz, who was with the company from its inception to 1986 and oversaw the revival of The Flash among other superheroes in the Silver Age.

Retail Value: $120

9. The Flash #174, "Stupendous Triumph of the Six Super-Villains!" (November 1967)

comicvine.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Murphy Anderson (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it’s iconic: Many people consider The Flash to be DC's version of Spider-Man, in that they're both normal people who had superheroics thrust upon them and their titles pay an equal amount of attention to their love lives, so it was only a matter of time before The Flash faced his own Sinister Six. This cover is just as iconic as the one for The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1, so kudos to Carmine Infantino.

Retail Value: $120

10. The Flash #184, "The Executioner of Central City" (December 1968)

coverbrowser.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Murphy Anderson (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it’s iconic: Drawn like an old-school pulp novel, this cover of The Flash has been paid homage to multiple times over DC's history.

Retail Value: $80

11. The Flash #275, "The Last Dance!" (July 1979)

coverbrowser.com

Artists: Alex Saviuk (Pencils) & Dick Giordano (Inks)

Writer: John Broome

Why it’s iconic: If you can find this issue, it'll be a steal at such a cheap price, since it's the issue where Iris West is murdered by Reverse-Flash. At a costume party. Dressed as Batgirl. Comic books are amazing.

Retail Value: $99

Advertisement

12. The Flash #276, "Freakout!" (August 1979)

comicvine.com

Artists: Alex Saviuk (Pencils) & Frank Chiaramonte (Inks)

Writer: Cary Bates

Why it’s iconic: A drugged up, grieving Barry Allen takes on the rest of the Justice League in the issue following Iris' death. The image of Barry tackling the entire JLA is awesome.

Retail Value: $23

13. Crisis on Infinite Earths #8 "A Flash of the Lightning" (November 1985)

coverbrowser.com

Artist: George Pérez

Writer: Marv Wolfman

Why it’s iconic: It's next to impossible to use brevity when talking about Crisis on Infinite Earths, just know that a bunch of different universes in DC were in "crisis" (there we go) and it led to the deaths of some major DC characters, including Supergirl and The Flash. Most of DC's continuity until recently was divided into pre and post-Crisis thanks to this series.

Retail Value: $150

14. The Brave and the Bold #28, "Starro the Conqueror!" (March 1960)

comicvine.com

Artists: Mike Sekowsky (Pencils) & Joe Giella (Inks)

Writer: Gardner Fox

Why it’s iconic: This issue introduced the world to the Justice League of America, originally consisting of Superman, Batman, Aquaman, Flash, Green Lantern, Martian Manhunter, and Wonder Woman. Batman and Superman rarely appeared on covers or in the issues at all, but the popularity led inadvertently to the creation of Marvel's Fantastic Four and a slew of other superhero groups.

Retail Value: $20,000

15. Justice League of America #1, "The World of No Return!" (August 1960)

comicvine.com

Artists: Mike Sekowsky (Pencils) & Murphy Anderson (Inks)

Writer: Gardner Fox

Why it’s iconic: The first issue of the Justice League with their own title highlights The Flash as he battles to save his teammates. Once again, Superman and Batman are in the issue but not on the cover except as chess pieces.

Retail Value: $16,000

16. Justice League of America #9, "The Origin of The Justice League!"

comicvine.com

Artists: Mike Sekowsky (Pencils) & Murphy Anderson (Inks)

Writer: Gardner Fox

Why it’s iconic: This issue features the JLA celebrating their third anniversary as a team and telling the story of how they formed. The basic alien plotline isn't as important as this ridiculous cover art that only the Silver Age could get away with.

Retail Value: $1,400

17. Superman #199, "Superman's Race with The Flash!" (August 1967)

coverbrowser.com

Artists: Carmine Infantino (Pencils) & Murphy Anderson (Inks)

Writer: Jim Shooter

Why it’s iconic: This was the first legendary race between Superman and The Flash. It was to determine who the fastest man alive was, but like, Superman is an ALIEN. So it's still The Flash. Anyway, these two were OBSESSED with racing and did it all the damn time.

Retail Value: $600

Retail values found at Comics Price Guide and eBay.

Promoted

Every. Tasty. Video. EVER. The new Tasty app is here!

Dismiss