LeighA
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    • LeighA

      Maybe “Pennsyltucky” is more accurate than I realized, because my family has lived in PA for generations and my grandparents say a lot of these. But I think “knee-high to a grasshopper,” “tan your hide,” “too big for his britches,” “all get out,” “running around like a chicken with its head cut off,” and especially “hold your horses” and “preaching to the choir,” and are just ordinary sayings that are common throughout the country. At least, I can’t imagine anyone not being familiar with the phrase “hold your horses.” Heck, according to Wikipedia, that spelling (as opposed to “hosses”) first appeared in a Canadian magazine, and the earliest printed instances of “preaching to the choir” all seem to be from outside the south (DC, Ohio, and California).

    • LeighA

      They did say boys can’t go into the girls’ dormitories (they’re magically kicked out), but girls can go into the boys’ dormitories, so that wouldn’t do much to prevent teen pregnancy. They do share rooms with several other people, though, so that might lower the odds a little. As for mobility issues…they can regrow bones, so they can probably just fix most of them. Of course, that does raise further questions, like what if a kid doesn’t want them fixed, and can magic cure genetic disorders?

    • LeighA

      jamestaylor—About 1% of the population has celiac disease, and there is little evidence that any other kind of gluten intolerance exists (people who improve on a gluten-free diet likely do so for other reasons, like FODMPAs or the placebo effect). Even if gluten intolerance does turn out to be real, it’s clear that most of the people who jumped on the gluten-free fad (and yes, it is a fad) don’t have it, because they experience no symptoms when unknowingly eating gluten in controlled trials. On the other hand, about 4% of adults and 8% of children have food allergies, with about 2% of the population being allergic to nuts and 1% being allergic to milk (wheat allergies are also relatively common, and benefit from the gluten-free fad). So, even if gluten intolerance exists, it’s probably at most on par with food allergies. But the consequences of someone with gluten intolerance eating gluten are a bit less severe than the potential anaphylaxis/death from food allergies.

    • LeighA

      Everybody seems to have gotten pieces of the difference. In the US, “jelly” is similar to jam. “Jam” has solid fruit bits, while “jelly” does not (and is not always made of fruit, but always has the same gel-like consistency). Jell-o is a brand name for gelatin. In the UK, “jelly” is gelatin. It’s also used for the same thing as American jelly, but mostly for non-fruit types, like mint jelly), and I don’t think they’re commonly used, so I doubt it’d be anyone’s first thought when they heard the word.

    • LeighA

      When my hair is wet, I basically have 4 small strands of hair sticking out in random places. Once it’s dry, I have to make sure that it’s arranged properly so bits of scalp aren’t visible, because there are a couple spots right in the front of my head that often are. (And this can happen at any time, so I have to double-check throughout the day.) Having to choose between having long hair and feeling pretty while knowing deep down it’s actually unflattering, or having short hair and feeling hideous and awkward even though it objectively looks better. I know there are many women who look great with short hair, but it just makes me feel bad about myself because it doesn’t mesh with my mental image of who I am. Not being able to skip a single day of washing because it gets super oily. (I have not tried dry shampoo, because with dark brown hair and pale skin, I’ve always been afraid to.) Constantly being told that “if you just give it awhile,” that stops happening, and being brushed off when you tell them you have done that, and it made your hair feel like an oil slick and look like you’d never even heard of shampoo. Constant tangles that seem to result in half the hair on your head being ripped out, and trying to find a product to stop your hair from getting so tangled without weighing it down and making it look like you haven’t washed it in a week. Braids being about the same width as a friendship bracelet, while other women have gorgeous thick braids that make them look like warrior princesses or something. And having more than one braid? Hahahaha no. Unless I sleep with my hair in braids or curlers and don’t wash it in the morning (which, as mentioned, is not a good idea), my hair can only hold a curl for about…half as long as it takes to curl it. If I attempt to solve this with hairspray, there is one spritz between “not enough to hold it” and crispy hair. Trying in vain to find a single “volumizing” product that does anything. Most types of hair accessories are a pain. Hair ties aren’t horrible, I just have to wrap them around 3-4 times (or like…8 at the bottom of a braid). Almost everything else (bobby pins, hair clips, etc) slides right out. Mostly, I’m just glad I wasn’t a teenager in the ’80s. I would have been screwed.

    • LeighA

      It’s supposed to make it look better. I know when I was a kid I was forced to get a haircut every time it grew past my shoulders because it looked so straggly (it was basically strand of hair, gap, strand of hair, gap, etc). It’s actually always bothered me, because I love long hair and feel prettiest with long hair (until I look in the mirror and realize it’s not particularly flattering), and I despise short hair. Every second my hair is shorter than chin length, I feel hideous and unfeminine and weird, not to mention annoyed that I can’t put it in a ponytail (that’s not to say I have any issue with other women having short hair, and many look great, but I really hate it for myself). So I’m constantly having to choose between feeling pretty and looking bad or looking okay and feeling awful about myself. Generally I keep it around shoulder length, which is long enough to keep me from being annoyed but not so long that I look horrible with it down. But it’s shorter than I’d have it in an ideal world.

    • LeighA

      The two most frequent complaints I’ve heard about thick hair are 1) it tangles like crazy and 2) it can break hair ties, and 3) it gets heavy when it’s really long. But…my hair is super fine and it also tangles like crazy, except that a tangle can leave a large, visible gap in my hair. And while it doesn’t break hair ties, I have to wrap a hair tie around 3-4 times (or 6-8 at the bottom of a braid), which means they get stretched out really quickly. As for it being heavy when it’s long—it may be uncomfortable but at least it looks amazing. Long fine hair just looks straggly and limp, like Angelica’s doll on Rugrats (minus the sticking straight up). Besides, fine or thick, having long hair is a choice.

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