LeighA
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    • LeighA

      “7. And then getting disconnected when your mom picked up the phone.” I see this a lot on lists like this, but this never happened to me. When we had dial-up, if someone picked up the phone while someone was on the internet, you just heard a staticky-sound instead of a dial tone. It didn’t affect the internet at all. So why did it apparently disconnect some people, but didn’t work that way for us?

    • LeighA

      1. Define “promiscuous.” Do you mean anyone who has sex with strangers, anyone who has sex outside of a relationship, anyone who has sex with more than a certain number of partners (and how many—20, 10, 5, 2, 1?), or anyone who has sex outside of marriage? Everyone seems to define it differently, so we need to know what we’re talking about here. 2. What are the consequences of promiscuity? I don’t mean possible pregnancy or STDs—those are largely preventable, and can happen even if you aren’t promiscuous. Why is being promiscuous (as you define it) “damaging…emotionally [and] physically, as well as..damaging to their friends, and family, future spouses, and eventually, future children”? I’m not the sort of person who can understand why someone would want to have sex with a stranger (I wouldn’t want a stranger to see me naked, period), but I can’t even begin to think of a way being promiscuous (again, whatever that means to you) would be damaging to your friends. It shouldn’t affect them at all. Who cares that much about their friends’ sex lives? It shouldn’t have much, if any, effect on your family or future kids, either (unless it causes your future kids, I guess).  It would only affect your future spouse inasmuch as they might care that you were promiscuous (and would be affected by any potential STDs, but you only have to have sex one time with one person to get an STD, so that doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with promiscuity). But I think it’d be best if promiscuous people married people who were either promiscuous themselves, or are at the very least completely okay with it, the same way religious people should marry religious people or people who are okay with them being religious, and people who don’t want kids should marry other people who don’t want kids or don’t really care either way. It’s a compatibility issue, not a right vs wrong issue.

    • LeighA

      Purebreds are notorious for having serious health issues (like hip dysplasia, breathing problems, etc). Mixed breeds generally help make for healthier dogs. You do have to be careful, though. Mixing a tiny dog and a huge dog is not a great idea, for obvious reasons. Dogs range from about 3 pounds to well over 200 pounds, and breeding anything with that kind of size difference is just asking for trouble.

    • LeighA

      If you wear sunscreen like the experts suggest, it’s expensive no matter what kind you buy. An 8 oz. bottle of Banana Boat Sport is about $8, and they say you’re supposed to put on about 1 oz. every 2 hours (http://www.aad.org/media-resources/stats-and-facts/prevention-and-care/sunscreens). That means a single $8 bottle is only supposed to last 16 hours.  If you spend an average of an hour a day outside all summer, following sunscreen guidelines, you’ll spend about $50 per person on sunscreen. If you spend a lot of time outdoors, say an average of 16 hours a week, that’s about $100 per person. If you spend an extraordinarily high amount of time outside (most likely because you work outside, or don’t work and spend all your time at the beach), you’re talking around $300 per person. And that’s ignoring the recommendation to reapply every time you swim or sweat, because I don’t want to bother trying to calculate that.

    • LeighA

      They really aren’t the same, though. They both involve teens falling in love and cancer, but that’s really about it. (Note: I’ve read both books but only seen A Walk to Remember. I’ve read that book a couple times and seen the movie a bunch, but it’s been awhile.) In A Walk to Remember, Landon doesn’t know Jamie has cancer at first, whereas in The Fault in Our Stars, they both have cancer and meet at a support group. Jamie’s cancer is a big, heart-wrenching reveal that takes the story from “tough guy falls for quiet religious girl” to “oh god this is going to end in tears, isn’t it?”, whereas cancer is woven through Hazel and Gus’s lives from the very beginning.  Jamie and Landon fall for each other while rehearsing a play together, Hazel and Gus really bond over a book and a trip to Europe to meet the author (and their shared experience of having cancer). And it’s not like the play and Europe are just convenient things to move the plot along. Both directly affect how the characters interact and how they see things. AWtR is big on faith and optimism and the idea that God is still there and still important even while Jamie faces a high probability of dying young. TFiOS is about people who aren’t really sure what having cancer means for the idea of God, but certainly aren’t embracing it as being part of some big cosmic plan. The kids in TFiOS get mad about having cancer, while Jamie mostly just peacefully accepts it. And, well, the endings are a bit different. Keeping spoilers to a minimum, AWtR is about giving Jamie’s life a happy (if early) ending. That doesn’t really happen in TFiOS. They have happiness, but there’s an underlying idea that ultimately it doesn’t end happily, because it never does.

    • LeighA

      “When you used the landline before 6pm.” I take it that costs extra in the UK? In the US, it’s only cell phones where time of day matters (or mattered, I should say, since they’re going towards unlimited minutes now). I looked it up and apparently you have to choose between unlimited weekend, unlimited nights and weekends, and unlimited anytime to UK landlines with discounts for mobile? In the US, you get unlimited local calls and you can pay a bit extra for unlimited long distance, plus calls to cell phones are just like calls to landlines. It does seem like it’s cheaper there, though, even if it is more complicated.

    • LeighA

      When I was in high school (in the US), we had police come and show us PSAs about not driving while drunk, distracted, etc, and they showed one class (not mine, but some of my friends were in it) a British PSA. All anyone could talk about after was how extraordinarily graphic it was compared to ours. I never saw it, so I’m not sure exactly what it showed, but I get the impression this sort of thing is pretty common there. I guess it makes sense that Ireland would be the same way. I wonder why our PSAs are so much tamer.

    • LeighA

      Harry Potter isn’t just a “series of novels for kids.” It’s a series that’s been around for almost 20 years and has books, movies, and a theme park (which these people were in the middle of while being asked these questions, no less), and has a massive following. It’s one of the most popular franchises ever, so it’s a pretty prominent part of our culture. And lots of adults like it—every single person in my family does. My grandpa watches the movies practically every time they’re on TV (which is a lot). Given where they were, I would almost guarantee they could see something with the word Gryffindor or quidditch on it as they were standing there unable to think of those words. Even if they couldn’t, they would’ve seen something just moments earlier. They also made it clear that their kids knew the answers to the questions. Didn’t they watch the movies with their kids? That seems like something most parents would do. They had to have seen them at least once. I can see not remembering every detail, but to not be able to remember Ron’s name after 8 movies seems weird to me.

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