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21 Things You Have To Deal With When You Have A "Foreign" Name

When in America.

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7. New teachers at school and roll call.

When the substitute teacher pronounce ur name wrong

Casey@thebieberarmour

When the substitute teacher pronounce ur name wrong

7:43 AM - 06 Jun 14ReplyRetweetFavorite

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11. You've had to create your own unique mnemonic devices to make it easier for everyone else.

how to pronounce my name: a story by me

tania@punksivan

how to pronounce my name: a story by me

6:51 PM - 30 May 14ReplyRetweetFavorite

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12. You've accepted that there are just some vowels folks can't pronounce, and created an alternate pronunciation for your native name.

Foreign Friend Be Like... "Achmed....Ahmet...Amaaaad. Achmen..." when trying to pronounce my name. https://t.co/yrtOpFulZl

Ahmed Shihab-Eldin@ASE

Foreign Friend Be Like... "Achmed....Ahmet...Amaaaad. Achmen..." when trying to pronounce my name. https://t.co/yrtOpFulZl

6:23 PM - 12 Oct 13ReplyRetweetFavorite

14. [Starbucks cup]

People have stopped trying.

15. If you also have an "unofficial"/Westernized first name, having to give more than one name each time.

Def Jam

Especially for Customer Service. "What's my name? Uh, well, the name I go by is Tanya but you should probably write down TIanyi."

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16. Filling out a job application and not knowing whether you should give your "official" or "unofficial" first name.

yourprintablepdf.com

Like, your official name corresponds with all your legal info, but you want your potential employer to refer to you by your "other" name. When you can't decide, you end up including the other in (parenthesis).

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