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13 Seriously Fascinating Wikipedia Pages You Probably Shouldn't Read After Midnight

You're welcome. I think.

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We recently asked members of the BuzzFeed Community to tell us which Wikipedia pages kept them up reading all night. Here's what they said...

Warning: Some of the articles on this list may contain disturbing content. Please continue at your own discretion.

1. The Salish Sea Human Foot Discoveries

CBS / giphy.com

Suggested by danielg4274f71f9.

OK, let's put this simply: In the last decade, 16 detached human feet have washed up on the shore of the Salish Sea in Canada and Washington, and nobody has an explanation for the phenomenon. No other body parts have been discovered. Only a few of the feet's owners have been identified. Some people have gone so far as to plant "hoax feet" in the area. So bizarre.

2. Rock Music and the Fall of Communism

Suggested by chewbaccakayla.If you need something slightly less gross to delve into after reading about mysterious detached human feet, you'll love this article on the role of rock music in the fall of the USSR. Not only does it explain how people bootlegged music and made their own instruments to get around the government's rules, but it also talks about the impact of rock music on fashion. It may not be spooky, but it is super interesting.
Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by chewbaccakayla.

If you need something slightly less gross to delve into after reading about mysterious detached human feet, you'll love this article on the role of rock music in the fall of the USSR. Not only does it explain how people bootlegged music and made their own instruments to get around the government's rules, but it also talks about the impact of rock music on fashion. It may not be spooky, but it is super interesting.

3. The Disappearance of Ben McDaniel

Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by Cassie Freeman, Facebook.

In August 2010, experienced scuba diver Ben McDaniel was declared missing after employees at a local diving equipment shop noticed his truck had been sitting outside for two days. It was thought that he had drowned after attempting a dangerous dive into a cave 58 feet under the water's surface – only no trace of his body was ever found. What makes it even creepier, though, is the mysterious circumstances surrounding his disappearance – because, according to a private investigator, it was actually the result of foul play.

4. Mitochondrial Eve

Suggested by Nick Ruberto, Facebook.If you've ever wondered where exactly we humans come from, this Wikipedia article is for you. The basic gist is that all humans alive today are descended from one woman through their mothers (and one man through their fathers – he's Y-chromosomal Adam). The language gets pretty science-y, but it's super interesting to learn where we all descended from. It's also kind of weird and existential crisis-y if you think about it for long enough.
Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by Nick Ruberto, Facebook.

If you've ever wondered where exactly we humans come from, this Wikipedia article is for you. The basic gist is that all humans alive today are descended from one woman through their mothers (and one man through their fathers – he's Y-chromosomal Adam). The language gets pretty science-y, but it's super interesting to learn where we all descended from. It's also kind of weird and existential crisis-y if you think about it for long enough.

5. Dupont de Ligonnès Murders

Suggested by jenniferh4a412e151..In 2011, in the city of Nantes in northwestern France, the bodies of five members of the Dupont de Ligonnès family – and their two dogs – were found buried under the patio in the back garden of their home. The father of the family, Xavier Dupont de Ligonnès, disappeared a few days earlier and hasn't been seen since. The creepiest part is the timeline of the family's activities in the days before they were murdered – and the photo of two of the children sent to a journalist in 2015. The back of the photo read, "I'm still alive."
Nicholas Cado / AFP / Getty Images

Suggested by jenniferh4a412e151..

In 2011, in the city of Nantes in northwestern France, the bodies of five members of the Dupont de Ligonnès family – and their two dogs – were found buried under the patio in the back garden of their home. The father of the family, Xavier Dupont de Ligonnès, disappeared a few days earlier and hasn't been seen since. The creepiest part is the timeline of the family's activities in the days before they were murdered – and the photo of two of the children sent to a journalist in 2015. The back of the photo read, "I'm still alive."

6. Five Suns

Suggested by lazuardi99nadya.The myth of the Five Suns stems from Aztec times. The Aztec people believed our current world was the fifth in a series of creation cycles, and the previous four worlds were destroyed in a variety of ways from flooding to raining flames. According to the Aztecs, the world we currently live in will be destroyed by earthquakes (in 2012, according to some people).
Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by lazuardi99nadya.

The myth of the Five Suns stems from Aztec times. The Aztec people believed our current world was the fifth in a series of creation cycles, and the previous four worlds were destroyed in a variety of ways from flooding to raining flames. According to the Aztecs, the world we currently live in will be destroyed by earthquakes (in 2012, according to some people).

7. Tarrare

NBC / giphy.com

Suggested by lukew47db22ec1.

Tarrare was this guy in 18th-century France who, since childhood, was constantly hungry and was known for his ability to eat crazy amounts of meat. He was hospitalised and subjected to medical testing after he joined the army and was unable to survive on military rations. During tests at the hospital, he ate live animals and once swallowed an eel whole. Don't think that's all there is, though – it gets worse. Just read it.

8. Revolution

Suggested by putridaskian.If you're in the mood for getting yourself into a seriously deep Wiki-hole, you might want to start at the Wikipedia page for revolution. Not only does it include a brief explanation of all the different kinds of revolutions, but there's also links to a list of every revolution that's ever happened, and – my personal favourite – a list of revolutions led by women.
Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by putridaskian.

If you're in the mood for getting yourself into a seriously deep Wiki-hole, you might want to start at the Wikipedia page for revolution. Not only does it include a brief explanation of all the different kinds of revolutions, but there's also links to a list of every revolution that's ever happened, and – my personal favourite – a list of revolutions led by women.

9. Project MKUltra

Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by hannahlomaxm2.

If you're a fan of Stranger Things, you may have already read up on MKUltra – and if you haven't, you should definitely take the time between seasons to learn all about it. The program started in the 1950s, when the CIA began performing a series of torturous experiments on human subjects with the intention of developing techniques to be used in interrogations. The creepy, secretive aspect of the experiments has led to several famous fictionalised versions, like Stephen King's Firestarter and, yes, Eleven from Stranger Things.

10. The Hum

NBC / giphy.com

Suggested by Mycroft.

Have you ever imagined you could hear a low-pitched, barely audible humming sound coming from what seems like nowhere? Well, you might not have been imagining it. That's ~The Hum~, and it's a phenomenon that's been reported for decades and all over the world. Oh, and if you fancy a nice evening rabbit hole, this one links to a list of unexplained sounds.

11. The 27 Club

Peter MacDiarmid / Getty Images, Central Press / Getty Images

Suggested by oliviamary.

The likelihood is you've heard of the 27 Club – a group of artists, musicians, and actors who all died at the age of 27 – but do you know the stories behind each of them? The list is a lot longer than you'd expect, so you have a lot to learn.

12. List of Unusual Deaths

Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org, Wikipedia Commons / en.wikipedia.org

Suggested by 0920730.

This is another one of those lists you'll want to bookmark, because no matter how bored you are (or how many items on the list you've read), you'll always find something fascinating you didn't know about before. For example, did you know that Jack Daniel – yes, that Jack Daniel – is said to have died when his toe became infected after he kicked his safe because he couldn't get it open? It's just a rumour, but a mildly interesting one.

13. List of Methods of Torture

FX / giphy.com

Suggested by zoer48c959dcd.

BE WARNED: This list is not for the faint-hearted. Pear of Anguish, anyone?

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