caitlinw8
 
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    • caitlinw8

      With all due respect, this kind of thing is shitty and dangerous. These are healthy meals. Of course, you can live perfectly well on a vegan diet, but acting like food becomes on healthy because a recipe includes things that aren’t, from a “vitamins and minerals” standpoint, AS healthy as, say, kale and quinoa, is, among other things, part of the reason we have people starving themselves and falling into the traps of eating disorders. “I ate an egg! Do you know how many calories are in an egg?!” “I ate some chicken! Now I’m going to get fat!” and so on and so forth until people are starving themselves and only eating one kale salad a day.  On top of that, foods like eggs, fish, and chicken offer nutritional benefits that foods like kale and quinoa do not- protein, healthy fats, etc.- things our body needs. And again, there are ways to get these things that don’t involve any animal products, so vegans can still get by just fine. But these things are necessary parts of a human diet. While Americans have a reputation for being unhealthy, a subset of the health movement has caused us to deny that, yes, carbs, proteins, fats, and more are all things our bodies NEED- just perhaps not in the proportions of the typical American restaurant meal.  These recipes are very healthy, not only in spite of the fact they include the foods you mention, but BECAUSE they include the foods you mention. The ratio of veggies/grains/proteins is, in many cases, the sort of thing we should make a goal. And even when not, there are worse things than not eating a “perfect diet” (especially since there’s no actual thing as a perfect diet). A list of good recipes for people who want to eat better deserves better than this ridiculous hyper-criticism.

    • caitlinw8

      Okay, I really hope the fear in this is a joke. First of all, unless you’re planning on taking a swan dive into a swimming pool filled with nail polish remover, I think we’re probably safer than that cup. Second, YES, nail polish remover dissolves things. THAT IS LITERALLY THE POINT OF THIS PRODUCT. It dissolves the nail polish so that it can be REMOVED from our nails. Finally, yes, styrofoam melts in acetone. The horror! Last I checked, fingernails were a bit harder than foam. If yours aren’t, then yes, I respect your use of caution. Next up in Scary Chemicals OMG: If you put paint on your walls, it CHANGES THE COLOR OF THEM. THE HORROR. *clutches pearls*

    • caitlinw8

      I’d like to offer a suggestion any willing public business owners to simply take down the gender signs on bathroom doors in response to this law. Of course, the priority should be taking action to reverse this bigoted BS- and I know not even everyone who would like to do this will be able to- but for those who can, it’s quick, easy, is a poignant gesture, and has immediate positive consequence- and not even just for trans folks. Ask anyone who’s waited impatiently for a men/women’s room while knowing full well the other bathroom was unoccupied. This way, take your pick! (But knock first.)

    • caitlinw8

      What makes you think I don’t think people share rooms? If there are two people in a room, they still have the right to close the door. They’ll find other ways to private around each other, and those should be respected, too. A door is largely used for privacy’s sake. If you have one, you have the right to use it. If you don’t, you have the right to find another way to be private. But you don’t get to take away someone else’s privacy without a pretty extreme cause. Sometimes I wonder why I don’t come to Buzzfeed any more. Then I see the people who make the comment section look like YouTube and it all becomes clear.

    • caitlinw8

      Calling most of these child abuse is pretty ridiculous, but: 10. Taking the bed frame I can understand, but taking the door off it’s hinges is taking away your child’s right to privacy. If there were doing drugs or something, I would say it’s a fair right to lose, but not cleaning your room? You can always do “inspections”- or just stand over them and make them do it right.  16. There may be more to this story- and “running for hours” might be an exaggeration? But if not? Forcing your children into exhausting physical exertion that would wear down even the strongest men? For speaking to each other?  19. A 3rd grader doesn’t know ice cream can be bad for cats. And I doubt she forced it down the cat’s throat. Grown adults responding to this not my educating their kid, but by forcing them to consume something that could make them sick?

    • caitlinw8

      I’m going to guess that you don’t have a mental condition. People with mental illnesses know that it’s not normal to get out of bed. And they don’t want to lie around all day. They don’t want to cancel plans. But in the depths of depression, on the worst days for someone with anxiety, or for anyone dealing with a condition at its worse, these little things can feel like Herculean tasks. People describe their mental illness in a wide variety of ways. It can feel like lead bricks weighing their body down to the bed. It can feel like such static and screaming in their head that even just lying in silence is an accomplisment- and not screaming or hurting yourself to make the pain that nobody can see stop. It can be the voices in your head telling you that the friends you want to be there for actually all hate you and would be much happier without you. Even when you know that’s irrational, the thought of being with people who are only tolerating your presence to be polite can make you physically ill. For me, my anxiety took the form of a constant tremor in the back of my head that eventually spread so I could feel it through my entire body. Doesn’t sound so bad at first except that I spent every moment- waking and sleeping- feeling like I was sitting on a high-powered washing machine. It was hard to think. It was hard to complete any physical activity. And, like a vicious cycle, my anxiety helped convince me that what I had was much more than anxiety and it was going to kill me.  I eventually got to my doctor, and I was lucky enough to have one who was kind, listened, understood, and helped. It still took some time to find the right medication. I started with one that made me feel worse, and stopped taking it. At that point, my body crashed. My vision swam. My heart raced like I was having a heart attack. I went to the emergency room on Christmas night- and took more of the meds to get back to “normal”. I could hardly function.  The next meds worked better. I finally started getting back to normal- actual normal, not “normal”. My anxiety has recurred since, and medication has helped every time. I’ve been lucky. I still have several, usually sound-based triggers (I’m very sensitive to noise), but by and large I’m healthy.  Many people are never so lucky. They suffer for years with countless random symptoms that others can’t even grasp. They may try medication after medication with no result. Or they might never get the medical help they need, either due to dismissal of their condition, the inability to afford help, both, or something else.  True, you wouldn’t tell someone with cancer to eat a lot of junk food. But would you say “I know exercise won’t make your breast cancer go away, but studies show how strengthening it is!” to someone who’d lost their hair to chemotherapy and just wanted to sleep all day because of how weak their body felt? This article is awesome because in reminding people to do these things, it acknowledges that simply having a bite to eat, walking around the block, or even just changing clothes are the kinds of things that can be major accomplishments for people who have to wage a battle against their own minds every minute, hour, and day or their lives. It says they’ve done SOMETHING, tells them that’s wonderful. Hearing that, knowing that, can give people who are struggling the strength to keep pressing on.  I’m not saying you don’t have a point. Some people do use mental illness as an excuse to be mentally and physically abusive to others. And some truly stop caring. Stop trying altogether. Much as I understand how tempting it can be to just stop, I also can’t fault those around them for eventually giving up after trying again and again to help them and never having the efforts returned or even acknowledged. In the end, you need to take care of yourself. And sacrificing yourself for the sake of someone who can’t even seem to be bothered is never something that should be expected, no matter what.  I’ve had plans cancelled by friends due to their bad days. And it sucks. And I’ve been mistreated by others using their condition as an excuse- which is itself inexcusable. But the difference in how this article addresses things and how you do highlights the dangerous stereotypes against those with mental conditions- that they are lazy, selfish, and uncaring, when, often, nothing could be further from the truth. As I said earlier, these are people fighting a battle against their own minds. These are people who are constantly- constantly- at war with an enemy nobody can see. And do you want to know why they keep fighting? It’s for the people they love. It’s for those friends who want to do things with them. It’s for the family who are so desperate to see them out of bed and smiling even when all they want to do is sleep and cry.  Telling someone to “just make a little effort and stop making excuses” ignores the black hole they are staring down. The one that seems endless. The one that mocks taking a walk, because even if you do force your body into motion today, you’re still going to feel like this tomorrow and the next day and the next week and possible every day for the rest of your life.  You don’t have to forgive everything people with mental illnesses do. You have the right to expect things from them. You have the right to be be disappointed when those expectations are fulfilled. You have the right to move on when they refuse to try and let you help them or help themselves. But don’t try to throw bootstraps arguments at them either. They’re already struggling with some of the heaviest bootstrap weights in the world just to stay alive. We need to understand just how overwhelming walking can be for people who work just to put one foot in front of the other every day.

    • caitlinw8

      The general point is very important, but some of the stronger/exaggerated statements (Saying “it is not Paris we should pray for”- and then going ahead and saying to say a prayer for Paris, And “Not one person’s status update says “Baghdad”, which is simply untrue. Far fewer yes, but blatantly not none.) take away from it. This status update just popped up on my Facebook feed and I really like how it makes the same point:  My brother died in Paris. My sister died in Beirut. My daughter died in Afghanistan. My son died in Baghdad. This is how heartbroken I feel. There is no need to say that you care only for one country and not another, and there is no need to say that one tragedy is worse than another. When one person dies, we have all been killed. Give your prayers for Paris, give your love for Beirut, give your tears for Afghanistan, and give your heart for Iraq. When it’s a time of mourning, don’t make the argument about what was posted on Facebook or social media. We all have the same enemy, and it is the cowards and the monsters of ISIS. If you want to express your anger, they are the ones that have attacked us. I know that we all feel like that we are living in terrible times, and in truth these are horrifying events. But at the same time, this is the moment where we have the potential to show the greatest humanity. If you are Muslim, tell a non-Muslim you love them or that you care for their wellbeing. If you are a Shia, say this to a Sunni, and if you are a Sunni, say it to a Shia. If you are a non-Muslim, give your love and compassion to a Muslim. At your mosques and centers, hold sessions in remembrance of those who were lost in all these lands. Remembrance is not just for the divine personalities of our history, but for all of these innocents. ‪#‎prayforparis‬ ‪#‎prayforbeirut‬ ‪#‎prayforafghanistan‬ ‪#‎prayforiraq‬ Pray for the world. Note: I do think people should be made aware if they are ignoring issues on social media- I didn’t know about many of these other attacks until they started popping up on Twitter, which does speak to the necessary point about news coverage. And if you’re using the internet as a platform to use tragedy for hate, you should absolutely be publicly called out. But otherwise.

    • caitlinw8

      No. There is no friendly way to say “I disapprove of your right to be who you are as a person when that doesn’t affect me in any way”, and calling someone out for being shitty, however many times they say the word “respect” while they’re doing so, is exactly what good people should be doing. The “you calling out my hate is hate, too!” ploy is overused and invalid, and yes, “I want to be nice to everyone, but I just can’t approve of what she (HE) did :-)” is hate, too. Bigotry would be a lot easier to conquer if it were always just the raving of obvious assholes.

    • caitlinw8

      I realize from my wording, I’m not even mentioning the actual point of the piece. I guess my gripe is mostly with having “POC character with white name” = “white character”. I think there are many reasons for Elliot’s name could be what it is, but the point about naming in general still stands. But from what I’ve seen, the actors and producers associated with this show are all proud of both their own backgrounds and those of the characters on this show. Mr. Robot has a diverse cast. That does not make it immune to race issues or criticism. But these are POC and there should be no fear of acknowledging that.

    • caitlinw8

      I know I am saying this as a white person, and I don’t want to speak over POC on this issue, but Elliot is not a white character. He is a member of a biracial family. His father was white, his mother was not. His sister looks more like their father, he looks more like their mother. I don’t want to keep harping on this, because this article makes some excellent points and especially because I don’t want to be associated with my fellow white people whining about “creating race issues”, but I am heavily reminded of the folks on Tumblr who complained that a clearly POC character created on a show by a POC was being turned into a “white boy” because members of his biracial family had lighter skin than he did. This author clearly has an advanced understanding of race issues in media, so I’m sure he’s aware that skin tones can vary in biracial families. It might just be the wording, particularly in the title, that bothers me, and I worry that this will hinder people from being able to appreciate his points. (Of course, far more people will ignore this piece out of ignorance, but…)

    • caitlinw8

      I forgot to add into my suggestion that, assuming phones are allowed into the theater, ushers should be hired to sit in the aisles during performances and to immediately kick out anyone using a phone for a non-emergency. (Of course, this, too, is flawed and Big Brother-y. I’d have to be nervous myself, as I do admit to occasionally just checking the time on my phone during shows- though while doing my best to keep my phone in my purse while it’s on the floor and while keeping as much of the screen covered as possible)

    • caitlinw8

      By and large, I completely agree with him. I still remember a study abroad trip I took to London. A few other girls and I got tickets to see Wicked. They were the equivalent of student rush tickets, all the way in back. But it was still WICKED. In LONDON. And what were the girls in the row in front of us doing? Playing on their phones. The entire time. A small light in a dark theater is a distraction to everyone, actors and audience alike. So is your supposedly quiet whispering. (Shoutout to the women- by far old enough to know better- who spoke in voices barely below normal volume through an ENTIRE. PERFORMANCE. at a regional theater). Shows like that are a once in a lifetime experience, and seeing them on your phone doesn’t compare to seeing them live. Putting your own desires over the overall atmosphere of the performance you paid to see is disrespectful to all involved. That said, these sorts of comments, no matter how valid, always remind me of my ever-increasing grudge with the idea that no theatrical performance should ever be filmed out of respect to the notion of seeing theater live. Now, is seeing theater live better than seeing in on a television or computer screen, or even in a movie theater? Absolutely. 110% percent. I’ve been going to shows since I was old enough to sit quietly for a few hours at a time. Live theater is an art form many, especially younger generations, don’t appreciate, and is something everyone should get to experience at least a few times in their lives. But there’s the rub. “Should” be able to. What of this performance- taking place in one single location in the world, for a limited period of time, with tickets selling out almost instantly and the few that are left going for $650? What do we tell people who cannot come- due to distance, cost, disability, or some other factor beyond their control. “Sorry, since you can’t see it live, you shouldn’t see it at all?” Because that’s essentially what we are telling people.  Don’t get me wrong- if you CAN see a show live, you absolutely SHOULD. Again, live vs. filmed isn’t a comparison that even comes close to being equal. But many people simply cannot. How does it promote a love of theater to keep any performance from those who might desperately want to see it from being able to do so, when we do have the methods to professionally and discretely record such things to share them with the world? What I would suggest is something like this: have recording done discretely and professionally in the back of the theater for one or two performances, letting the audience know that the performances will be filmed. I personally don’t favor the idea of taking phones away before a performance- I myself like to take shots of stage dressings well before the performance begins to commemorate shows I attend- and if seeing the stage dressing on a ransom instagram discourages you from seeing a performance, please do get over yourself- but I wouldn’t object to such rules, so long as exceptions were made for potential emergencies (doctors and the like). Then, wait until after the complete run of the show to release the footage, to discourage people from viewing it online and not giving the full cost of a live show. Perhaps offer discounts or incentives to counteract those who might still decide to “just wait for the filmed version”. And still do make the footage cost something- maybe a quarter or so of the live performance, depending on ticket cost? Of course, have the contributions go towards the theater- and perhaps other arts organizations. I realize this is not a perfect plan. I recognize I know nothing about making shows come together. There should be input from professionals, and I welcome criticism. But as love of theater is important, it is something that should be shared with everyone who wants to appreciate it, regardless of their location, income, or physical ability. I know filming a performance will stop some people who might see it live from doing so, no matter what you do, and this is a problem that should be recognized. But when privileged people talk about filming of shows as though it is on par with having people scream insults at them at the top of their lungs, they ignore the reason that many people DO film shows- not be rude or arrogant, but to share something they love with others who would love it, too, but are simply unable to afford the same privilege.

    • caitlinw8

      How about when you can’t be fired for your sexuality in any state, are able to bring a child into a loving home with two parents of the same gender in every state, when no countries restrict the legal protections of marriage to any two equal, consenting adults, and when nowhere in the world is simply being queer a crime that can get you harassed, punished under national law, or murdered? …So that would be never? Sorry, sorry, I’m actually not THIS much of a cynic at all. In reality, let this trend die out naturally while always continuing to remember this awesome victory, and, above all, never stop fighting. As for this being “just a symbol?”- yeah, it is, but it’s a symbol of something people have fought generations for. Yes, some people are just joining a trend. Plenty more proud and have damn good reason to be- so let it go, already!

    • caitlinw8

      This is laughable, because it’s not even an argument. You’re just blatantly wrong. You’re basically sitting here saying “How dare you gay people want the right to say the sun is a star? The sun is an asteroid and nothing is going to change that!” Marriage existed before Christianity. The marriage of two people is a legal bond that comes with rights and protections under the law. Meanwhile, the Christian definition of marriage has included a man owning his wife and Christians have argued for traditional marriage in trying to prevent people of different races from getting married. The Bible does reference men lying with men, yes, but the actual concept of same sex marriage? Not mentioned. Non-Christians get married. Christians get divorced. I can’t even get angry, really. You’re just blatantly, factually incorrect. A screaming child throwing a tantrum and only humiliating himself in the process. But by all means, keep at it.

    • caitlinw8

      Thanks for inspiring me to enjoy a Cherry Coke today! I am reminded of the guy who drank nothing but McDonalds to prove that fast food could kill you in just a few bites or whatever. I only drink soda once or twice a week. Moderation is key, adults make their own decisions, and we know that soda is sugar water. Now, if we want to address advertising directed towards children, who shouldn’t be that responsible about making their own diet choices, and yet who are the main group the makers of unhealthy food groups often target, that’s a conversation worth having. I drink soda and am in good health. I cut down from a few times a week to my current rate and did not explode into a super slim female Adonis of perfection. But I am glad I made the change. Do what’s right for you.

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