caitlinw8
 
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    • caitlinw8

      First: the system of checks and balances is greatly affected by the fact all three powers are in Republican hands- and especially by the way Republicans backed down to Trump, even after speaking out against him. So those others branches of government could, realistically, approve his actions. Is it as simple as some people are making it out to be? Probably not. I find Paul Ryan’s message of a unified party almost laughably naive given everything that’s happened in this election so far. A lot of these people hate Trump, too, but will they stand up? They haven’t yet. So yes, that fear is real. Second, fewer than half of Americans voted and fewer than half of those voted for Trump. And even among those who did, Trump had minimal support. All you heard about Democrats saying Hillary was the “lesser of two evils”? Republicans were saying the same about him. The rise of third parties was based on dismal approval ratings for both candidates. While the wash of hate crimes makes the group seem bigger simply because of how loud they are, I’d wager the people who truly wanted this man to be our president, over any other option, are a significantly small portion of the “we” comprised of all American citizens. Third, telling people in fear of their humanity to “get over it” kinda speaks for itself.  Fourth, I don’t see the tone of this as fear-mongering at all. Exactly the opposite. This article is acknowledging that people are afraid and telling them they have a right to be, but telling them that they have love and support and they will get through.  We’re being bombarded with so much right now. Hate crimes across the nation. Truly bigoted people being given high-level positions- even if they might not actually DO much, people targeted by bigotry have a right to fear its presence in the White House. We know fake news was everywhere (and yes, I’m sure it came from all sides of the political spectrum). And both the signals that Trump is truly, uniquely unprepared for presidency and his recent flip-flopping should be alarming more to his supporters than to the rest of us. This is what you are telling people to “get over”. FWIW, I do agree that those of us who are angry, upset, and afraid right now are pulling ourselves into a cycle of panic and despair that does no good. I read articles about authoritarianism from people who have studied it that offer terrifying similarities, but little explanation of HOW our current systems will be dismantled. People declaring America dead. And even when these people say to do all you can, the tone of their arguments basically suggests there is nothing we can do. (If America is broken, we can rebuild it. If it is dead, we cannot.) But people are doing plenty already. If you sit back and do nothing, if your rhetoric only says to give up, then yes, I do think you should “get over” that. And that, again, is what I’m getting from this piece, too.

    • caitlinw8

      You know, every single one of these articles where people who personally dislike a food (which is fine) talk about how it’s THE TRUTH that the food is terrible or that only people who “understand” KNOW that the food is terrible (which is less fine) are ridiculous, but this one really takes the cake. Besides the fact that the author boils the multi-faceted and deeply cultural world of mole down to a few few photos of a single kind of sauce, the notion that simply because it was made with chocolate, it should taste like a sweet chocolate sauce is absurd- as is the idea that you should expect a savory Mexican dish to taste as though it has had sweet chocolate sauce poured over it, and for that notion to be appealing. Are you sure your Tia wasn’t just messing with you?

    • caitlinw8

      11/14. Missed 6 (but I just try not to take ANY drugs with alcohol), 11 (I said all of the above, but, to be fair, those amounts are pretty darn close), and 12 (I was torn between 15% and 12% but went with 15 because of higher APV trends these days) The point is: drinking can be okay, but it’s way too easy to turn it dangerous. We don’t think of it the way we do illegal drugs just bc it IS legal, and that’s not a good way to think. Don’t drink too much. Don’t drink as therapy. Don’t drive drunk. Don’t mix substances. Don’t treat drinking to excess as some kind of cook skill. Watch out for friends who have been drinking. Know the signs of alcohol poisoning, and help immediately. Know the signs of alcoholism, and intervene as a responsible family member/friend. All these things should be common sense.  I drink a half glass of wine with a light snack most nights. I usually drink a few beers over the weekend. Sometimes mixed drinks. But I know my limits, I know my my body, I know how to be safe, and I now how to look out for problematic patterns in my consumption. Everyone should be able to do the same.

    • caitlinw8

      It’s not about the price, it’s about how the shoes are made. Expensive 3 inch heels? They’re not going to stop hurting your feet because you paid $200 for them. Look for good arch support, shoes that fit well but leave room for your toes even when walking, shoes that don’t pinch, shoes with at least some padding, etc.- and wear heels or other shoes that force your feet into unnatural shapes sparingly. These options are available at a wide range of prices.

    • caitlinw8

      I have such mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, I see white people getting upvoted here for saying this is getting upset about “LITERALLY NOTHING”, or countering with “I wouldn’t get upset if someone wore a typical white person outfit as a costume!”. But the the reason people are upset is that while most intelligent people would not think that say, a white person wearing a sombrero and a moustache reflects all Mexican people, such a costume reflects stereotypes that have been in place for far longer than this debate and that white people don’t have to deal with. In the case of, say, a traditional Native American outfit, such clothing has deep spiritual meaning to these groups, and to see it worn as a costume is legitimately offensive. But I have a hard time carrying this over to this particular instance. This is a costume of a specific character, one whose main identifying feature is a lot of tattoos. The only logical way to make a mass market costume for this character is to print the tattoos on fabric. And because the tattoos must be printed on fabric, the fabric should reflect the skin color of the character in question. I do see that there’s a kind of creepy element to wearing a costume where fabric = skin, and I can see this argument that this is, in an unavoidable way, a form of brownface. But if there’s ever an exception to the rule, I would say this is it.

    • caitlinw8

      With all due respect, this kind of thing is shitty and dangerous. These are healthy meals. Of course, you can live perfectly well on a vegan diet, but acting like food becomes on healthy because a recipe includes things that aren’t, from a “vitamins and minerals” standpoint, AS healthy as, say, kale and quinoa, is, among other things, part of the reason we have people starving themselves and falling into the traps of eating disorders. “I ate an egg! Do you know how many calories are in an egg?!” “I ate some chicken! Now I’m going to get fat!” and so on and so forth until people are starving themselves and only eating one kale salad a day.  On top of that, foods like eggs, fish, and chicken offer nutritional benefits that foods like kale and quinoa do not- protein, healthy fats, etc.- things our body needs. And again, there are ways to get these things that don’t involve any animal products, so vegans can still get by just fine. But these things are necessary parts of a human diet. While Americans have a reputation for being unhealthy, a subset of the health movement has caused us to deny that, yes, carbs, proteins, fats, and more are all things our bodies NEED- just perhaps not in the proportions of the typical American restaurant meal.  These recipes are very healthy, not only in spite of the fact they include the foods you mention, but BECAUSE they include the foods you mention. The ratio of veggies/grains/proteins is, in many cases, the sort of thing we should make a goal. And even when not, there are worse things than not eating a “perfect diet” (especially since there’s no actual thing as a perfect diet). A list of good recipes for people who want to eat better deserves better than this ridiculous hyper-criticism.

    • caitlinw8

      Okay, I really hope the fear in this is a joke. First of all, unless you’re planning on taking a swan dive into a swimming pool filled with nail polish remover, I think we’re probably safer than that cup. Second, YES, nail polish remover dissolves things. THAT IS LITERALLY THE POINT OF THIS PRODUCT. It dissolves the nail polish so that it can be REMOVED from our nails. Finally, yes, styrofoam melts in acetone. The horror! Last I checked, fingernails were a bit harder than foam. If yours aren’t, then yes, I respect your use of caution. Next up in Scary Chemicals OMG: If you put paint on your walls, it CHANGES THE COLOR OF THEM. THE HORROR. *clutches pearls*

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