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    Updated on Jul 27, 2018. Posted on Jul 26, 2018

    Here Are All Of The References You Missed In Ariana Grande's "God Is A Woman" Music Video

    Everything you need to know, from the beavers to the Bible verses.

    Earlier this month, Our Lady Of Strictly Pop Bangers, Ariana Grande, released her latest single and music video for "God Is a Woman," and the internet quivered.

    View this video on YouTube

    youtube.com

    It's a music video heavy with visual references, especially to the female body and ancient art — in one of the first scenes, for example, we see Ariana in a bath shaped like a vagina.

    Ariana Grande / Divulgação

    After that, we see Ariana striking a pose that's very reminiscent of the famous sculpture "The Thinker" by Auguste Rodin.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube / Via youtube.com, Domínio Público

    (Note: Tweet is in Portuguese.)

    And in this scene, where Ariana straddles the world, fans speculate that it's a reference to Gaia, the Greek earth goddess — and yes, she's fingering the world.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube / Via youtube.com, Ariana Grande / Vevo

    Here, Ariana is wearing the iconic cone bra that Madonna made famous in the '90s. Behind her is a three-headed dog — i.e. Cerberus, the mythical dog who guarded the hates of hell according to Greek mythology.

    We see plenty of other symbols of fertility and female power throughout the video — at one point, she appears to become pregnant while being surrounded by flowering plants.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube

    Plus, the scene where all those tiny men are nursing at Ariana's torso calls to mind the Capitoline Wolf, a sculpture of the mythical she-wolf who nursed Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube, Wikicommons / Via Di User:Jean-Pol GRANDMONT (2011), CC BY-SA 3.0, commons.wikimedia.org

    It's also a reference to Ariana's Italian heritage, which she often talks about.

    There's more Roman references, too: At one point, Ariana is on a set that looks a lot like the Pantheon, which is a temple in Rome. In the music video version, the light is coming between two legs spread wide.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube, Wikicommons

    And of course, in the most overt display of feminine power, Ariana then swings a sledgehammer labeled "power," and breaks a literal glass ceiling overhead.

    Ariana Grande / Vevo

    That's when we hear the voice of Madonna as God, reciting the Bible verse Ezekiel 25:17, which was famously popularized in Pulp Fiction. The music video changed the line about "brothers" to "sisters."

    Reprodução, Wikicommons

    "I will strike down upon thee, with great vengeance and furious anger, those who attempt to poison and destroy my sisters, and you will know my name is the Lord, when I lay my vengeance upon you."

    One Twitter user pointed out that the gospel choir that surrounds Ariana later could be a reference to The Handmaid's Tale, especially since all of the women are wearing hoods.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube, Hulu / Reprodução

    Towards the end, we see Ariana making the shape of a vagina with her hands and sitting in a very Illuminati-esque triangle:

    Ariana Grande / YouTube

    And finally, in one of the video's most memorable visuals, we see Ariana recreating Michelangelo's "The Creation of Adam" fresco painting, except of course, she has replaced Adam with a woman and swapped herself in for God.

    Ariana Grande / Divulgação / Via youtube.com, Domínio Público

    Oh and BTW: That bizarre scene with the screaming beavers? It's probably a reference to the screaming beaver/marmot YouTube video. Since "beaver" can be a nickname for vagina, it still kind of makes sense...we think.

    Ariana Grande / YouTube

    So, God is a woman and maybe also a beaver?

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    This post was translated from Portuguese.