rosyjen916
SHARE THIS PAGE View Viral Dashboard ›
    • rosyjen916

      I’m not a teacher, but in my junior year of high school, I was in a AP US History class with 13 other people. We were such a tight-knit class that our teacher, Mr. Strackman, gave us all nicknames. During the year, we secretly coordinated to make t-shirts to wear during the AP exam, and I designed the shirts. The front of the shirts had all of Mr. Strackman’s “bromances” (George Washington, Henry Clay, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Martin Luther King Jr.), and the back had our nicknames. When the shirts came in, we all put the shirts on before he got to class and surprised him. It was great to do something cool for him since he’s a really good teacher and his class was enjoyable.

    • rosyjen916

      You got: Nicotine by Nell Zink Zink’s Nicotine is the perfect quirky read for fall: Penny Baker; the only conventional member of her eccentric family; inherits her late father’s childhood house only to find it occupied by a group of anarchist squatters who have named the property “Nicotine.” Yet Penny finds the squatters charming and even becomes part of their collective, eventually leading to a fateful confrontation between the family she was born into and the new one she’s chosen. A funny and charming story about families both literal and metaphorical. You got: The Story of a Brief Marriage by Anuk Arudpragasam Set two and a half decades into the Sri Lankan civil war, The Story of a Brief Marriage follows Dinesh, a Tamil refugee who is approached by an old man with a proposal that could change his life: If he marries the man’s daughter Ganga, they would both have a better shot at safety and a less violent future. The tale of two strangers suddenly thrust into a strange new relationship, The Story of a Brief Marriage is an immersive portrait of life touched by war and despair that will be sure to move you this season. You got: A Gambler’s Anatomy by Jonathan Lethem In Jonathan Lethem’s new novel A Gambler’s Anatomy, professional backgammon player Bruno Alexander believes he has psychic powers. Unfortunately for Bruno, it seems that his luck has run out — after a bad run in Singapore, Germany doesn’t go as planned either and a tumor behind his eye forces him to undergo experimental surgery, which is paid for by a childhood acquaintance who has an agenda of his own. Set between Berlin and Berkeley, California, A Gambler’s Anatomy will take you on a colorful adventure this fall. You got: Mischling by Affinity Konar Affinity Konar’s novel Mischling will haunt you all season: identical twin sisters Pearl and Stasha fight to survive the horrors of Auschwitz, where they are subjects in Mengele’s Zoo — Dr. Josef Mengele’s cruel and inhumane experiments. When Pearl disappears one winter, Stasha desperately holds onto the hope that she is still alive, and after the camp is finally liberated, must grapple with being a survivor amid the devastation of the world she once knew. You got: The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang Jade Chang’s debut novel The Wangs vs. the World follows Taiwanese-born American businessman Charles Wang, who must unite his children to start fresh in China after losing his fortune to the 2008 recession. The Wangs set off on a road trip across the country, all the way struggling to deal with their new financial situation — and each other. Highly entertaining and often laugh-out-loud funny, The Wangs vs. the World shows the often surprising ways hardship can bring a dysfunctional family closer together as well as what it means to be an immigrant in America today. You got: Today Will Be Different by Maria Semple Today Will Be Different takes place on the one day Eleanor Flood decides to get her life together. Unfortunately for her, that’s the day when everything goes awry — with her husband, son, and even buried secrets that suddenly threaten to surface. Crackling with honesty and heart, Today Will Be Different hilariously captures one woman’s attempts to reinvent herself and stay sane amid the chaos of everyday life. You got: The Mothers by Brit Bennett In Brit Bennett’s debut novel The Mothers, 17-year old Nadia begins a romance with the local pastor’s son, Luke, after her mother dies, that leads to a pregnancy she must hide from everyone in her small community, including her religious best friend Aubrey. The Mothers follows Nadia, Luke, and Aubrey into adulthood, examining how decisions made in youth and the “what if” questions that follow can affect and haunt us years after the fact — certainly, you’ll be thinking about this book long after fall is over. You got: Swing Time by Zadie Smith In Zadie Smith’s new novel Swing Time, two black girls grow up aspiring to be dancers but only one has talent, creating a rift between them as they go on to lead separate lives. Set across West Africa and London, Swing Time is a sweeping, energetic tale of a complex friendship that speaks to the ways in which our roots and childhood relationships can have a hold on us even later on in life. You got: The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead Colson Whitehead’s powerful new novel The Underground Railroad is one of the most exciting books of the season, and Oprah’s latest Book Club pick to boot. The Underground Railroad follows a slave in Georgia who escapes from a cotton plantation and flees north via a literal Underground Railroad — a network of secret underground tracks and tunnels — while all the way facing horrors that still resonate in America today.

    • rosyjen916

      Rocks Fall Everyone Dies by Lindsay Ribar For you, summer has always been about spending and cherishing time with family, which is why you’ll enjoy Rocks Fall Everyone Dies by Lindsay Ribar. Aspen Quick’s family has a magical secret; a ritual keeps a cliff from collapsing onto their town. But things begin to change when Aspen, who enjoys using his abilities, begins questioning both the past and future. Summer Days and Summer Nights: Twelve Love Stories You often prefer having an unplanned, carefree summer that involves new adventures. Because of this, you’ll enjoy Summer Days and Summer Nights, a fun collection of summer stories by best-selling YA authors, including Leigh Bardugo, Francesca Lia Block, Libba Bray, Cassandra Clare, Brandy Colbert, Tim Federle, Lev Grossman, Nina LaCour, Stephanie Perkins, Veronica Roth, Jon Skovron, and Jennifer E. Smith, edited by Stephanie Perkins. Lucky Few by Kathryn Ormsbee You love when your summers are as fun and unique as your personality, which is why Lucky Few by Kathryn Ormsbee will appeal to you. Stevie and Sanger help oddball neighbor Max complete his “Ways to Fake My Death Without Dying” checklist, but Stevie slowly begins to realize these themes of death might just hit too close to home. You Know Me Well by Nina LaCour and David Levithan You want a summer filled with whirlwind, romantic potential, which is why you’ll enjoy You Know Me Well by Nina LaCour and David Levithan. Set in San Francisco, Mark is in love with Ryan, who doesn’t feel the same way. Kate has never met Violet in person and although the feelings are there, she’s afraid of what might happen when they do meet in real life. But when Kate and Mark meet in the city during Pride Week, they quickly discover that friendship often shows in the right place at the right time. Mirror in the Sky by Aditi Khorana When it comes to summer, you definitely have a STRONG urge for traveling and exploring new places, which is why Mirror in the Sky by Aditi Khorana will appeal to you. When Tara discovers a message from an alternate Earth, she realizes there could actually be a parallel universe. And when her normal life begins to shift little by little, she begins to believe that something huge is about to happen. How to Disappear by Ann Redisch Stampler Your ideal summer is fueled by adrenaline — whether it’s riding adventurous roller coasters or cliff diving in Hawaii. That’s why you’ll want to pick up How to Disappear by Ann Redisch Stampler. Told in alternating perspectives, this story follows a murder witnessed by Nicolette and a boy with one mission: to get rid of her. The Leaving by Tara Altebrando When it comes to summer, you prefer the element of surprise, changing things up from day to day. This is why you should pick up The Leaving by Tara Altebrando. Eleven years after their mysterious disappearance, five of six missing teenagers return. They were 5 when they were taken, but don’t have any recollection of what happened. Nor do they know what happened to the sixth victim, Max. This intriguing story will have you flipping pages until the very end. The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash You typically prefer to have an introverted summer filled with reading and surfing the web, which is why you’ll enjoy The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash. Grant and Roxy are best friends, but when Grant starts having feelings for Roxy, he plans to tell her in a special way: at Comic-Con. But will things turn out the way Grant hopes? How It Ends by Catherine Lo You prefer having a low-key summer with your friends. As long as they’re around, you’re happy, which is why you’ll enjoy How It Ends by Catherine Lo. Told from the perspective of two BFFs, this book touches on the hardships of friendship and what happened to bring these two characters apart.

    • rosyjen916

      “Here Comes the Sun” by Nicole Dennis-Benn
      In Nicole Dennis-Benn’s vibrant debut novel, Here Comes the Sun, three Jamaican women and their community come together to fight for their village when it is threatened by plans for a new hotel, but must reckon with their pasts along the way. A compelling exploration of exploitation, sacrifice, tourism, poverty, and the drive for freedom, Here Comes the Sun will transport your mind — and heart — this summer. Publication date: July 19 “Grace” by Natashia Deón
      Natashia Deón’s novel Grace looks at the lives of slaves in the South in the 1840s — focusing on a girl named Josephine who was born to a white father and who stands out with her blonde hair and light skin, and her mother who was murdered as she was born. Gripping and deeply affecting, Grace is an examination of injustice, violence, love, legacies, and survival that you’ll be still be thinking about long after summer is over. Publication date: June 14 “The Girls” by Emma Cline
      Emma Cline’s debut novel, The Girls, will thrill you in the all the right ways this summer. Set in late 1960s Northern California, where lonely 14-year-old Evie Boyd is drawn to a group of girls who belong to an infamous cult (loosely based on Charles Manson’s), The Girls is the dark, seductive coming-of-age story of a young woman getting sucked into a terrifying world. Publication date: June 14 “Homegoing” by Yaa Gyasi
      Yaa Gyasi’s epic novel Homegoing is a sweeping account of two half sisters in 18th-century Ghana and the lives of their many generations of descendants in America. A stunning, unforgettable account of family, history, and racism spanning three centuries, Homegoing is one of the most ambitious books of the season. Publication date: June 7 “Boy Erased” by Garrard Conley
      Garrard Conley’s memoir traces his struggles with his sexuality as a young man and the son of a pastor in a small Arkansas town. When Conley was outed to his parents at 19, he underwent a conversion-therapy program intended to “cure” his “illness” and impure urges but instead came out more resilient than ever. A brave, powerful meditation on identity and faith, Boy Erased is the story of one man’s journey to accepting himself and overcoming shame and trauma in the midst of deep-rooted bigotry. Publication date: May 10 “Problems” by Jade Sharma
      Get real this summer with Jade Sharma’s debut novel, Problems, which takes an unflinching look at addiction through the lens of Maya, a young woman in New York with a heroin habit whose life begins to unravel after her husband leaves her. Bold and honest, Problems is a fresh look at recovery, redemption, and one woman’s increasing nest of problems. Publication date: July 5 “Heroes of the Frontier” by Dave Eggers
      Go on a wild adventure with Dave Eggers’ novel Heroes of the Frontier, following a divorced woman named Josie as she flees from her life in suburban Ohio to Alaska with her two kids in tow. Dark yet often funny, Heroes of the Frontier is the story of a family trying to escape the disappointments and mistakes of the past while facing a natural world that is surprisingly violent. Publication date: July 26 “The Good Lieutenant” by Whitney Terrell
      Take some time to reflect this season with Whitney Terrell’s novel The Good Lieutenant, which unfolds backward in time from a tragically botched operation in Iraq that results in the death of Lt. Emma Fowler’s secret lover and many others. More than just your typical war story, The Good Lieutenant traces the backstories of soldiers and Iraqis involved alike, bringing out a very human, intimate side of the Iraq War. Publication date: June 7 “Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty” by Ramona Ausubel
      In Ramona Ausubel’s novel Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty, a wealthy New England family in the 1970s is shocked to discover there is no money left in the family fortune. Married couple Fern and Edgar cope by going their separate ways (a road trip and sailing, respectively) while their three young children are left to themselves with no adult supervision. A wonderfully whimsical tale of privilege and class and what happens when you lose everything you’ve come to take for granted, Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty is the escape you need this summer. Publication date: June 14

Load More
Loading...