Skip To Content
    Posted on Dec 30, 2013

    What Do You Call The Bit Between Christmas And New Year?

    Let's settle this once and for all.

    It's a strange time of year. With so much time off, you can start to feel a bit lost and directionless.

    you know between Christmas and new year when you're just kinda lost and don't know what to do

    Stephen Wraysford

    @w4nkor

    you know between Christmas and new year when you're just kinda lost and don't know what to do

    / Via

    We need to think of something to do with the period between Christmas and New Year. It just sits there, doing nothing.

    Dan Hodges

    @DPJHodges

    We need to think of something to do with the period between Christmas and New Year. It just sits there, doing nothing.

    / Via

    And the trouble is, there's no word for this period. Which only adds to the feeling of groggy purposelessness.

    This no man's week between Christmas and New Year's really needs a purpose and a name...

    Dr. Algernop Krieger

    @KriegerSignals

    This no man's week between Christmas and New Year's really needs a purpose and a name...

    / Via

    Not every country has this problem.

    The days between Christmas Eve (when we celebrate) and New Year's Eve is called "Romjul" in Norwegian. Great word that English needs.

    Ole A. Imsen

    @Weirdmage

    The days between Christmas Eve (when we celebrate) and New Year's Eve is called "Romjul" in Norwegian. Great word that English needs.

    / Via

    We should learn from Norway's example and decide on a word. But what?

    A quick glance at Twitter yields a few suggestions.

    1.

    Between Christmas and New Year - Twixtmas.

    Ed Browse

    @Bacony_ghost

    Between Christmas and New Year - Twixtmas.

    / Via

    2.

    The time between Christmas and New Year's Day is called the Witching Week and nothing you do in this week counts.

    a thoughtful bug

    @Maltalonos

    The time between Christmas and New Year's Day is called the Witching Week and nothing you do in this week counts.

    / Via

    3.

    The period between Christmas and New Year should be called Food Week.

    Bubblegum Bitch

    @mumbleexD

    The period between Christmas and New Year should be called Food Week.

    / Via

    4.

    The bit between Christmas and New Year when no one knows what day it is is called Chrimbo Limbo.

    Cavalier Platitudes

    @cleansocksfox

    The bit between Christmas and New Year when no one knows what day it is is called Chrimbo Limbo.

    / Via

    5.

    The week between Christmas and New Year's should be called the Holiday Taint.

    Log Jam

    @Sickayduh

    The week between Christmas and New Year's should be called the Holiday Taint.

    / Via

    6.

    HornyLorny

    @Audiocats

    @Sickayduh Or just Taintmas.

    / Via

    However, if we're going to be democratic about it, there's a clear frontrunner in terms of popularity.

    For those confused, the bit between Christmas and New Year is called the Perineum. That is all.

    Tim Sandford

    @ConfusedTim

    For those confused, the bit between Christmas and New Year is called the Perineum. That is all.

    / Via

    My mum just described the days between Christmas and New Year as "a festive perineum".

    Nell Frizzell

    @NellFrizzell

    My mum just described the days between Christmas and New Year as "a festive perineum".

    / Via

    I like to think of this dream-state patch between Christmas and New Year as a sort of temporal perineum.

    Jessica Fostekew

    @jessicafostekew

    I like to think of this dream-state patch between Christmas and New Year as a sort of temporal perineum.

    / Via

    Perineum (n): In males, the region between the scrotum and the anus. See also, the time between Christmas and New Year.

    Richard James

    @RichardNJames

    Perineum (n): In males, the region between the scrotum and the anus.

    See also, the time between Christmas and New Year.

    / Via

    @alstewitn @DPJHodges An acquaintance refers to this moment as the "Christmas perineum". Apologies if you're still eating.

    stefanstern

    @stefanstern

    @alstewitn @DPJHodges An acquaintance refers to this moment as the "Christmas perineum". Apologies if you're still eating.

    / Via

    "Christmas Perineum" does the job, but it's a little wordy. Is there a snappier version...?

    It's that awkward bit in between Christmas and New Year. Merryneum, if you like.

    Phil Sawyer

    @fatboyfat

    It's that awkward bit in between Christmas and New Year. Merryneum, if you like.

    / Via

    Bingo. It's settled, then. Happy Merryneum, everyone!

    BuzzFeed Daily

    Keep up with the latest daily buzz with the BuzzFeed Daily newsletter!

    Newsletter signup form