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    • juliam4f12c815f

      Since I mistakenly didn’t use paragraphs, I’m reposting for easier reading.  It’s always easier to dismiss people as idiots without delving into why they feel the way the do. The phenomenon is a little more complicated than presented in this brief overview on BuzzFeed.
      First the people who have written on Fiona Broome’s website or written to her privately don’t all necessarily believe wholeheartedly in alternate universes or claim to know what the answer is to their alternate memories. Even Fiona has says she likes to entertain various theories about things but doesn’t claim to understand them or have ultimate truth.  Many people come to the website because they have a alternative memory they can’t explain away as a faulty memory, even though they wish they could. We all have plenty of those and most people can be persuaded they have misremembered something when it is a vague memory. However, often these are specific memories with plenty of context to them - i.e. viewing a newscast about a celebrity’s death in your home or someone else’s home, who was with you, how you felt when you heard the news, what thoughts you had. Also, they aren’t things you simply forget and later when you hear that the celebrity is in some new production or has NOW died, you have a vague feeling that you had heard they had died. (Sometimes that DOES happen, but those incidences alone wouldn’t make this interesting.)  Rather, it’s more of believing one thing ever since the memory was created (however it happened) and being stunned to find out that what you knew was true is no longer true. Imagine waking up on September 11 one year, expecting the usual newscasts and memorials and seeing and hearing nothing, looking up September 11 on-line and finding nothing about the terrorists attacks, then mentioning to a friend of family member and having them look at you with confusion or fear for your sanity. That’s a dramatic example, but that’s the kind of thing people have experienced with all sorts of (generally less dramatic) events.  Also, most of us know the difference between a dream and a memory. Even my more vivid dreams generally don’t feel real, and even if they do, I wake up from them and know what they are. I would sooner believe that one of my alternate memories happened in my head only during waking time and something misfired in my brain when this memory was made than to think it was a dream. The thing is, I would think if THAT happened, I would have possibly have missing time, or friends or family members would be worried about me, trying to check me into a mental health care facility, or that I would not be able to handle daily life. None of that has happened. Rather, the alternate memories I have are often shared, if not by someone I know, by someone on line who has listed it before had any chance to read about it.  Finding that a stranger shares a specific memory with you about a news story is a comfort, even if you don’t know the reason. It shows that something outside yourself, whatever it is, hasn’t just happened to you. Anyway, you may all want to check out Fiona Broome’s website, but a word of warning, if you just get on to make fun of or call people stupid, you message will simply be deleted. The website is a place to share experiences without fear of censor. I don’t know what to make of alternate universes, but hey, it’s a quantum universe - I think it’s way more complicated than we have been taught, and perhaps we will eventually understand more.

    • juliam4f12c815f

      It’s always easier to dismiss people as idiots without delving into why they feel the way the do. The phenomenon is a little more complicated than presented in this brief overview on BuzzFeed. First the people who have written on Fiona Broome’s website or written to her privately don’t all necessarily believe wholeheartedly in alternate universes or claim to know what the answer is to their alternate memories. Even Fiona has says she likes to entertain various theories about things but doesn’t claim to understand them or have ultimate truth. Many people come to the website because they have a alternative memory they can’t explain away as a faulty memory, even though they wish they could. We all have plenty of those and most people can be persuaded they have misremembered something when it is a vague memory. However, often these are specific memories with plenty of context to them - i.e. viewing a newscast about a celebrity’s death in your home or someone else’s home, who was with you, how you felt when you heard the news, what thoughts you had. Also, they aren’t things you simply forget and later when you hear that the celebrity is in some new production or has NOW died, you have a vague feeling that you had heard they had died. (Sometimes that DOES happen, but those incidences alone wouldn’t make this interesting.) Rather, it’s more of believing one thing ever since the memory was created (however it happened) and being stunned to find out that what you knew was true is no longer true. Imagine waking up on September 11 one year, expecting the usual newscasts and memorials and seeing and hearing nothing, looking up September 11 on-line and finding nothing about the terrorists attacks, then mentioning to a friend of family member and having them look at you with confusion or fear for your sanity. That’s a dramatic example, but that’s the kind of thing people have experienced with all sorts of (generally less dramatic) events. Also, most of us know the difference between a dream and a memory. Even my more vivid dreams generally don’t feel real, and even if they do, I wake up from them and know what they are. I would sooner believe that one of my alternate memories happened in my head only during waking time and something misfired in my brain when this memory was made than to think it was a dream. The thing is, I would think if THAT happened, I would have possibly have missing time, or that friends or family members worried about me, trying to check me into a mental health care facility, or that I would not be able to handle daily life. None of that has happened. Rather, the alternate memories I have are often shared, if not by someone I know, by someone on line who has listed it before had any chance to read about it. Finding that a stranger shares a specific memory with you about a news story is a comfort, even if you don’t know the reason. It shows that something outside yourself, whatever it is, hasn’t just happened to you. Anyway, you may all want to check out Fiona Broome’s website, but a word of warning, if you just get on to make fun of or call people stupid, you message will simply be deleted. The website is a place to share experiences without fear of censor. I don’t know what to make of alternate universes, but hey, it’s a quantum universe - I think it’s way more complicated than we have been taught, and perhaps we will eventually understand more.