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19 Places In Wales You Seriously Need To Visit In 2016

Fairytale castles, legendary lakes, and an island populated by puffins.

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Cost: Free

Location: Part of the Black Mountain region of the Brecon Beacons.

The site of one of Wales' most famous legends: The Lady of the Lake. You probably won't encounter a watery woman rising from a lake, but you will encounter some stunning scenery. Bring a pair of hiking boots.

More information here.

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Cost: Adults £14.00, children (ages 3-16) £9.50, children aged 2 and under go free.

Location: Abercrave

Translated into English, its name means "under the cave", and that's exactly what you're getting with a trip to Dan Yr Ogof National Showcaves. There's also a load of life-size plastic dinosaurs scattered around the place, so keep your eyes peeled.

More information here.

Cost: Free, but bring along some spending money for the bookshops.

Location: Hay-on-Wye

A book lover's heaven. With its myriad charming bookstores, the small market town – best known for its annual literary festival – is the perfect place for readers all year round.

More information here.

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Cost: 50p per person, and the money goes towards the good cause of maintaining the footpaths.

Location: Betws-y-Coed

The appropriately named Fairy Glen is a protected wildlife site and has a large population of rare ferns and lichens for visitors to enjoy. But who cares about ferns when you have a site this beautiful to take in?

More information here.

Cost: It's £4.50 for adults and £3.40 for senior citizens, students, and children under 16.

Location: Chepstow, as you probably guessed.

Chepstow Castle wouldn't look out of place in an episode of Game of Thrones. Hey HBO, come film some scenes in Wales.

More information here.

Cost: Adults £10.00, children (ages 5-15) £7.00, children aged under 5 are welcome at no charge.

Location: Portmeirion

Recognisable to some as the setting of the '60s spy thriller The Prisoner, this place is equally breathtaking for people who've never seen the show.

More information here.

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Cost: £21 for adults and £7 for children will buy you a boat trip and landing on the island.

Location: Off the southwest coast of Pembrokeshire.

An island populated entirely by puffins sounds like something from a children's book, but Skomer Island is just that. The island even has its own unique species of vole. Do you have your own unique species of vole?

More information here.

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Cost: £13.40 for adults and £6.70 for children gives visitors access to both the castle and the gardens.

Location: Welshpool

Originally built as a medieval fortress, this French- and Italian-inspired castle is home to a world-famous garden that will give gardeners some serious envy.

More information here.

Cost: Free

Location: On the northeastern edge of Snowdonia.

Home to the flowering 15th-century cottage Ty Hwnt i’r Bont (House Beyond the Bridge), this small Welsh town is like a postcard come to life. Just think of all the Instagram opportunities.

More information here.

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Cost: If you're a basic adult it's £5.50, but if you're a senior citizen, student, or child under 16 it's £4.10.

Location: Overlooking the village of Tongwynlais.

This Disney-esque revival castle was rebuilt in the 19th century – a whole 500 years after its destruction.

More information here.

Cost: FREE

Location: Four miles west of Cardiff City Centre.

Anyone who grew up in South Wales was probably dragged here at least once on a school trip. St Fagans National History Museum is an open-air museum chronicling the lifestyle, culture, and architectural history of Wales and its people. Oh, and did we mention it's free?

More information here.

Cost: Free if you're prepared to climb, but if you want to take the railway to the top, and back down again, it's going to cost £27 for an adult and £18 for a child (aged 3-15).

Location: Snowdonia National Park

Possibly the most scenic location in all of Wales, and hell, maybe even the world. Standing at 3,560ft, Wales' tallest mountain isn't a place for people afraid of heights. Don't look down*.

*Please look down, the views are breathtaking.

More information here.

Cost: Free

Location: Near Bosherston, South Pembrokeshire.

Named after the hermit and saint who is said to have lived in the area in the 6th century, the church was built sometime in the 13th century. For those planning a visit, it's worth noting that the pathway to the church is pretty steep.

More information here.

Cost: Free

Location: South Cardiff

Previously known as Tiger Bay, the area saw a huge redevelopment effort that was completed in 2000. The area is home to both T=the Senedd and the Wales Millennium Centre, and many more buildings important to Welsh culture and politics.

More information here.

Cost: Entry to the gardens will cost adults £6.50, children (aged 6-16) £2, and children 5 and under nothing.

Location: The Isle of Anglesey

Anglesey’s Plas Cadnant Hidden Gardens were a secret for more than 70 years. Having been restored to their former glory, the gardens are now open to the public, so anyone can enjoy their magical landscapes.

More information here.

Cost: Free

Location: Off the Pembrokeshire coast.

A true natural beauty. Elegug is the Welsh word for guillemot, the species of birds that can be regularly seen on the rocks. And "stacks"? Well…because the rocks look like they've been stacked there, I guess.

More information here.

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