16 Words That Can Mean Something Completely Different In The U.K.

And how to avoid potentially embarrassing situations while abroad.

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3. Biscuit

What it means in the U.S.: A buttery, flaky bread served with savory meals.

What it means in the U.K.: A cookie.

Potentially confusing sentence: "I can't eat a biscuit unless it's dripping in gravy."

4. First floor

What it means in the U.S.: The floor at ground level.

What it means in the U.K.: The floor above the ground level floor.

Potentially confusing sentence: "That super-important meeting is taking place on the first floor — don't be late!"

5. Fancy dress

What it means in the U.S.: Formal attire.

What it means in the U.K.: Costume.

Potentially confusing sentence: "Those girls invited us to a fancy dress party tonight. Now where can I get a tuxedo?"

6. Trainers

What it means in the U.S.: A fitness expert who helps you work out.

What it means in the U.K.: Sneakers.

Potentially confusing sentence: "Work out with trainers? What do I look like, a millionaire?!"

7. Chaps

What it means in the U.S.: Leather leggings worn by cowboys designed to protect the legs whilst horseback riding.

What it means in the U.K.: Guys.

Potentially confusing sentence: "Nothin' sexier than a pair of assless chaps!"

9. Cider

What it means in the U.S.: A nonalcoholic apple juice popular in the fall.

What it means in the U.K.: An alcoholic beverage derived from fermented apples, popular every season.

Potentially confusing sentence: "I used to drink cider every day as a kid."

12. Garden

What it means in the U.S.: A designated area for growing flowers or crops.

What it means in the U.K.: A backyard.

Potentially confusing sentence: "No thanks, I don't want to drink beers in your garden because I'm not a crazy person."