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    Posted on Jan 21, 2015

    The Original Concept Art From "Back To The Future Part II" Is Awesome

    What 2015 looked like in 1988, by designer Edward Eyth.

    Daniel Dalton / BuzzFeed / Universal

    Edward Eyth is a California-based designer who has provided concept design for the likes of Walt Disney, Steven Spielberg, and Jim Henson.

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Police patrol car 2015.

    In 1988, Eyth was part of the team who dreamed up a vision of 2015 for Back to the Future Part II.

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    McFly residence kitchen 2015.

    Now we've arrived in 2015, Eyth has posted some of his early concept art for the film on his website. It's a vision of the future more than 25 years old that in places is scarily accurate, and in others still ahead of its time.

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    McFly home entertainment-communication centre.

    Eyth told BuzzFeed: "At that point in Hollywood there were just a handful of concept designers providing art to accommodate the sci-fi renaissance that Star Wars, Tron, and other films started."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Home fusion power device, using refuse for fuel.

    "Word of mouth was the primary means of getting work – often a director or producer I'd worked with would pass my name on when a sci-fi project entered pre-production."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Robotic food preparation device.

    "In this case, it was a dream gig: Sit in a trailer on the Universal Studios lot with a handful of other 'visual futurists' and speculate about what the experience of living in 2015 would be like."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Refrigerator.

    "Fortunately this could all be done with an imaginative flair, since the film had a playful tone and a tolerance for some outlandish concepts."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    George McFly's orthopedic inversion device.

    "A film's visuals are primarily dictated by the script, combined with the director's vision. Within that structure there's still a lot of room for creative exploration."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Jacket with tech enhancements.

    "I was inspired by Syd Mead's work on Blade Runner and Tron [and] the sketchbooks of Joe Johnston for the Star Wars films – the great sci-fi films that preceded BTTF II drove my urge to be in the film industry."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Wrist communicator and micro disk player.

    "And great product design inspires me; the ability to inventively problem-solve and explore the form and function of objects."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Wrist communicator and micro disk player.

    "Filmmakers take a big risk when making any bold statements about how the future will play out."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Wrist communicator and micro disk player.

    "In Back to the Future [Part II], it was more about projecting forward three decades and creating a visual experience that was realistic and relatively optimistic."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Video/VR display glasses.

    "To accomplish that required exploring projected technologies and trying to imagine what the 'next step' in that progression would be."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Dehydrated pizza package.

    "Things I think I got right: much of the personal electronics, hand-held tablets, video glasses, video conferencing, multi-channel flatscreen monitors, dehydrated food."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Info-nerd devices.

    "As for wrong: the prevalence of fax machines. So wrong, but that was in the script, so I won't take responsibility."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Wall-mounted touch ID and fax machine.

    When I was assigned to create a layout for the 2015 USA Today newspaper, I inserted a feature on the cover that mentions 'Washington prepares for Queen Diana's visit'. A lighthearted projection that's now so wrong, sadly.

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    3D Holo screen communication terminal.

    "Doc Brown's DeLorean time machine is my favourite design from the film, though I had absolutely nothing to do with designing it."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Security robots.

    "I always liked the design of the DeLorean itself, and the inventive time machine elements just looked so nicely handmade and believably fabricated in some garage science lab."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Housekeeping robot.

    "As for designs that didn't make it into the film, the Robonanny was probably my favourite. I finished that sketch and thought it would really work as a product."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Robonanny.

    "(Director) Bob Zemekis loved the idea, it was built, filmed, and ultimately ended on the cutting-room floor. That's showbiz."

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Housekeeping robot.

    “The driving incentive in entertainment is to create something ‘that's never been seen before’, and artists & writers have free reign to create things that might be completely unrealistic in the current state of technology.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Landscape maintenance robots.

    “To some extent engineers and commercial designers are constrained by manufacturing budgets, market realities, and generating revenue. Few companies have the resources to experiment and innovate in bold ways.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Public sanitation robots.

    “More importantly, I think fictional films and narratives can have a dramatic influence on cultural consciousness.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Digital vending machines.

    “You can portray a future that's dreadful and bleak, or create excitement about a 'how cool would this be?' scenario.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Doc Brown's DeLorean remote control device.

    “I prefer working on the latter, and using the power of media to plant the seeds of hopefulness.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Mobile automated hot-dog vending unit.

    “Twenty-six years later, the film is still a gem of great entertainment, and I find satisfaction in seeing people continue to view the films and enjoy them.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Compu-vend kiosk.

    “It was a privilege to work with Bob Zemekis, a visionary director, and the entire crew of talented artists who participated in the production.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    Fingerprint ID vending screen.

    “I have a DeLorean in my garage that I'm trying to convert into a time machine so I can go back and get it right this time so the film holds up under all the fan scrutiny it's experiencing now.”

    Edward Eyth / Via eeyth.com

    '80s-themed diner.

    You can see more of Edward Eyth's Back to the Future designs at his website.

    Edward Eyth's artwork was brought to our attention via Newsweek and iO9. H/T to Newsweek for the find.

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