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    41 Of The Best Movies To Stream On Hulu In July

    Barb & Star Go To Vista Del Mar, Take Shelter, Gone Girl, and more great titles you'll want to stream this month.

    We hope you love the shows and movies we recommend! Just so you know, BuzzFeed may collect a share of revenue or other compensation from the links on this page. Oh and FYI: Platform, prices, and other availability details are accurate as of time of posting.

    1. Another Round (2020)

    Madds Mikkelsen imbibing with his students.
    Samuel Goldwyn Films / Courtesy Everett Collection

    The winner for Best International Film at this year's Academy Awards, Another Round tells the story of four middle-aged, disillusioned teachers in Copenhagen who decide to start consuming a small amount of alcohol throughout the day in order to see how it impacts their social and professional lives. The entire cast is phenomenal but Mads Mikkelsen steals the movie as Martin, a depressed man who rediscovers his zeal for life when he begins incorporating drinking into his daily life. What really makes the film work is its balance; while Another Round never shies away from the very real risks of drinking, at the same time, it manages to resist getting preachy as its main characters explore the pros and cons of alcohol consumption. This dark, funny, strange story walks that delicate line to the very end moment of the film, leaving it up to the viewer to decide what to make of these four friends' bizarre experiment.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    2. Arrival (2016)

    Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner staring into the distance.
    Paramount Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    When you think of alien invasion movies, your mind likely goes to massive explosions and gigantic battle sequences with the fate of the Earth on the line. You won't find any of that in Arrival. Instead, when extraterrestrial spaceships appear in different locations around the planet with no explanation, linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) is the unexpected hero who is charged with the task of figuring out how to understand and communicate with the otherworldly visitors. Director Dennis Villeneuve proves to be a master of suspenseful storytelling, as he is able to create a tense atmosphere and explore several thought-provoking themes without getting too heavy-handed, all while subverting nearly every trope of alien cinema. The movie is a worthy entry into the pantheon of great sci-fi films, but the eight Academy Award nominations it received, including Best Picture and Best Director, proved that Arrival had managed to transcend genre altogether. Though, in a just world, Adams would have finally won her much-deserved Oscar for her subtle performance. (Criminally, she wasn't even nominated.)

    Watch it on Hulu.

    3. The Assistant (2019)

    Jon Orsini and Julia Garner hard at work
    Bleecker Street Media / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Years deep into the #MeToo movement, the entertainment industry is still figuring out how to effectively hold a mirror up to itself and tell stories about the pervasive culture of sexual harassment onscreen. The Assistant manages to do so by delivering a masterclass in "show, don't tell," as viewers get a front row seat into the devastating effects of systemic oppression women face in the workplace through the eyes of Jane (Julia Garner), a young and ambitious junior assistant working at a production company in New York. Even in the most mundane moments of her job, Jane experiences subtle yet potent sexism while persistent rumors float around the office regarding her unnamed and unseen boss using his position of power to sleep with young women. The understated tone of the movie quietly creates an almost horror-like atmosphere, as even a meeting between Jane and the company's head of HR (Matthew Macfadyen, best known as Tom on Succession) becomes a terrifying display of how powerless she is to fight against a system built to protect those in power.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    4. Barb & Star Go To Vista Del Mar (2021)*

    Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo hanging out in the pool.
    Lionsgate / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Barb (Annie Mumolo) and Star (Kristen Wiig) leave their suburban existence behind for a getaway in beautiful Vista Del Mar. The two friends just want to ride an inflatable banana and enjoy some nice drinks by the pool but they end up accidentally in the crosshairs of a bizarre evil plan that involves lethal mosquitoes. Wiig's is as fantastic as ever but it's a blast to watch Mumolo, a relative unknown who has mostly made a name for herself as a writer (including earning an Oscar nom for co-writing Bridesmaids with Wiig), deliver a breakout performance. The two are fantastic as the titular best pals and their script is packed with goofy gags and absurd one-liners. As a result, Barb & Star is the type of movie that tragically doesn't really get made anymore: a comedy where the primary goal is to make the audience laugh as much as possible. 

    Watch it on Hulu.

    5. Batman Begins (2005)

    Christian Bale using alternative interrogation methods on Cillian Murphy.
    Warner Bros / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Bruce Wayne's origin story is so well known in popular culture that it feels impossible to explore anything new, but Batman Begins made his journey from orphan to masked vigilante feel entirely fresh. The key is the partnership between director Christopher Nolan and Christian Bale, who brings a brooding intensity to Wayne that serves as a radical departure from all other onscreen portrayals. The duo dive deep into Wayne's psyche, as well as exploring the larger meaning of Batman as a symbol for justice. While Nolan and Bale are the heart of the movie, it also benefits from a fantastic cast of supporting characters, most notably Michael Caine as Alfred, Gary Oldman as Commissioner Gordon, and Liam Neeson as Ra's al Ghul. The Dark Knight may get all of the attention thanks to Heath Ledger's performance as the Joker (which, to be fair, is a genuine masterpiece), but Nolan's best Batman movie is unquestionably the first in the trilogy.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    6. Beetlejuice (1988)*

    Michael Keaton butting up his jacket.
    Warner Brothers / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Following the surprise success of Pee-wee's Big Adventure, Tim Burton wanted another hit to prove himself as a big-time director. He landed on Michael McDowell's script about a recently-deceased couple hiring a bio-exercist named Beetlegeuse (Michael Keaton) to drive out the family moving into their former home. On the surface, it sounds like a career-killer but it turned to be a massive critical and commercial hit. And while this is arguably Burton's best film, it's impossible to overestimate Keaton's titanic impact on Beetlejuice's success. What's amazing is that Keaton's actual time onscreen is relatively short but he makes the most of it, delivering a hilariously unhinged performance as the sleaziest spirit you've ever had the misfortune of crossing paths with. In a just world, this would have landed Keaton an Oscar.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    7. The Big Chill (1983)

    Jeff Goldblum and Tom Berenger chatting over a drink.
    Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    A group of college friends are reunited 15 years after graduation when their friend Alex commits suicide. They end up spending a weekend together, and while they start out cheerfully reminiscing, slowly, the anger, disappointment, and confusion hiding beneath the surface begins to show. The Big Chill is considered one of the defining portrayals of the Baby Boomer generation, as the characters are forced to reconcile with abandoning their youthful idealism in favor of a more comfortable yet compromised existence. The entire ensemble cast is terrific, as they manage to create a familiarity that will have you believing that they really are old college friends. If nothing else, you can at least enjoy seeing a young Jeff Goldblum doling out his one-of-a-kind charm.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    8. Bill & Ted Face the Music (2020)*

    Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter reaching out to the audience with arms wide open.
    Orion Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    It's the year 2020 and time and space have started to crumble because Bill (Alex Winter) and Ted (Keanu Reeves) have failed to write the prophesied song that would unite the universe in peace and harmony. While they head to the future to try and discover the song, their daughters, Billie (Bridget Lundy-Paine) and Thea (Samara Weaving) head into the past in order to assemble the greatest band roster in the history of music. Reeves and Winter remain as charming as ever but Weaving and Lundy-Paine manage to hold their own and arguably end up with most of the best jokes and shenanigans in the movie. It never quite captures the magic of Excellent Adventure or even Bogus Journey but Face the Music is a worthy third entry into this beloved time-traveling franchise.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    9. The Blair Witch Project (1999)

    Heather Donahue looking extremely frightened.
    Artisan Entertainment / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Found footage has become a staple in the horror genre, and Paranormal Activity, Cloverfield, and countless others owe a debt of gratitude to The Blair Witch Project. It may not be the first found footage horror film, but Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sánchez's film undoubtedly popularized the format. The story is simple: Three aspiring filmmakers head into the woods of Maryland to create a documentary around a local legend known as the Blair Witch. As the trio venture deeper into the woods, they begin to have strange experiences, including hearing children laughing and items disappearing, that leave them wondering if the legend of the Blair Witch is real or if it's all in their head. Despite being made on a shoestring budget of less than half a million dollars, the movie feels so realistic that at the time of its release, many viewers legitimately believed that they were watching a documentary.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    10. Bound (1996)

    Gina Gershon and Jennifer Tilly having a tense conversation.
    Gramercy Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Part neo-noir crime thriller, part forbidden lesbian love story, Bound centers on Corky (Gina Gershon) and Violet (Jennifer Tilly), who quickly fall in love and hatch a plot to rob Violet's mobster boyfriend of $2 million. The film directorial debut of the Wachowskis, who would go on to helm the Martix trilogy, was considered so controversial upon its release that Gershon's agents told her she would ruin her career if she took the part. Rather than take their advice, Gershon parted ways with her agents and took the role of Corky, telling Entertainment Weekly she was drawn to the role because "I never get to play the hero and to get the chick." Gershon's decision paid off, as the film flopped at the box office but slowly developed a cult following and is now considered a classic in LGBTQ cinema.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    11. Collective (2019)

    Magnolia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Collective follows Romanian journalists as they uncover widespread corruption by the government's handling of healthcare. What really sets Collective apart from most modern documentaries is its confidence to not need to use the genre's clichés to over-explain everything to the audience. There is no voiceover or dramatic score to try and manipulate you as a viewer; instead, you just get to see what is unfolding on screen. Collective made less than $150,000 at the global box office, but it has received universal praise from critics, winning Best Documentary at the European Film Awards and London Film Critics Circle. It even became the first-ever Romanian film to earn a nomination at the Academy Awards.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    12. Crawl (2019)

    Kaya Scodelario hiding from a scary alligator.
    Paramount Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Crawl technically has a plot, but all you really need to know is that Haley Keller (Kaya Scodelario), her dad Dave (Barry Pepper), and their dog Sugar end up trapped in their Florida home after a hurricane and have to avoid being eaten by killer alligators while they wait to be rescued. The straightforward premise, along with the short runtime (87 minutes), allows for Crawl to dive quickly into the action without ever forcing the movie to slow down for pesky distractions like character development or emotional nuance. And director Alexandre Aja perfectly understands the appeal of the movie and is more than happy to give audiences what they want by coming up with increasingly ridiculous yet awesome ways for Haley to narrowly avoid getting devoured by the hungry gators. This may not be the most intellectually stimulating movie you watch this month, but it will easily be one of the most fun viewing experiences you have.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    13. Dumb & Dumber (1994)*

    Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels looking great in their suits.
    New Line Cinema / Courtesy Everett Collection

    As you may have surmised by the title, this is a movie about two guys who are extremely dumb. Whether they are accidentally poisoning a hitman or just finding out about the moon landing, Harry (Jeff Daniels) and Lloyd (Jim Carrey) are a perfect duo stuck in their endless stupidity, always finding a way to make the exact wrong decision or say the exact wrong thing. A lesser movie would try to turn them into better people but there's no lesson to be learned for Harry and Lloyd. They began the movie as hopeless morons and they finish the movie the exact same way, without any personal growth. And for that, you have to love them. Just avoid the prequel and the sequel because neither come close to matching this masterpiece of imbecility.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    14. Fargo (1996)*

    Frances McDormand talking on the phone.
    Gramercy Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Fargo has been discussed ad nauseam online, to the point where it can feel like there's not much to say about Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand) investigating the disappearance of Jean Lundergaard (Kristin Rudrüd) in the little town of Fargo. But I do think after more than three decades of film-making, more than any other movie in the duo's impressive filmography, Fargo feels like the most coherent representation of the Coen Brothers' worldview. Life is as chaotic as it is meaningless and the world is packed with cowards and crooks who will screw you over whenever they can. But if you really commit yourself to working hard and standing by your convictions, you might just have a shot at making the world a slightly better place.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    15. Fired Up! (2009)*

    Eric Christian Olsen and Nicholas D'Agosto sitting on exercise balls.
    Screen Gems / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Shawn (Nicholas D'Agosto) and Nick (Eric Christian Olsen) are the two star players on their high school football team but they decide to ditch football camp in favor of cheerleading camp in order to get girls. This mostly forgotten teen comedy bombed at the box office and it never quite manages to transcend the genre like Mean Girls or Clueless. However, it's an extremely fun and entertaining watch and I firmly believe Fired Up! deserves to become a cult classic someday due to its nonstop, joke-a-minute script and the effortless chemistry between D'Agosto and Olsen. Put it on and you may be surprised by how much you are laughing.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    16. Footloose (1984)

    Lori Singer and Kevin Bacon tearing up the dance floor.
    Paramount Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Even if you haven't seen this movie, you're probably familiar with the basic story: Chicago native Ren McCormack (Kevin Bacon) is forced to leave the big city behind and heads to Bomont, a small Southern town that has literally banned dancing. Ren quickly falls for Ariel (Lori Singer), the rebellious daughter of Rev. Shaw Moore (John Lithgow), who is responsible for the no-dancing mandate. The plot is what everyone remembers (along with the quintessentially '80s soundtrack), but there's so much more to this film, including Bacon's star-making lead performance. Even when he is dancing out his feelings in a warehouse or getting into a game of tractor chicken, Bacon exudes pure charisma that allows him to effortlessly carry the movie. And while Footloose is commonly thought of as a light and breezy teen flick, the movie also features some heavy themes, including grief, abuse, and the importance of standing up for what you think is right, regardless of what it costs you.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    17. Gone Girl (2014)

    Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike on a date.
    20th Century Fox / Courtesy Everett Collection

    When Amy (Rosamund Pike) goes missing on the fifth wedding anniversary to her husband Nick (Ben Affleck), suspicion quickly begins to grow that Nick may be hiding something. What sounds like a fairly straightforward whodunnit turns out to be so much more. For much of Gone Girl, you think you are watching one story only to discover about halfway through that you are being told a different story altogether. The movie works almost entirely thanks to Pike giving one of the best acting performances of the last decade as Amy, a character who excels at keeping her true motivations close to her chest. Keeping up with Pike is a tall order, yet Affleck, who has become better known for his directing than acting, proves himself to be up to the task, playing Nick with just the right blend of scumbaggery, self-loathing, and sad-eyed charm. At its core, Gone Girl is a movie about the tenuous nature of connection and whether or not qualities like loyalty and trust are as powerful as mutually assured destruction.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    18. Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004)

    John Cho and Kal Penn taking off their helmets.
    Fine Line Features / Courtesy Everett Collection

    You know those comedies that you loved when they came out, but then you rewatch it for the first time in over a decade and discover how terribly they've aged? Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle is, shockingly, not one of those movies. In fact, against all odds, the raunchy stoner comedy (mostly) holds up 15 years after it was a surprise box office hit, even featuring some prescient social commentary about racist policing and white privilege (though the film does suffer from its one-dimensional female characters). The key to the movie's success is questionably the spectacular odd-couple chemistry between the uptight, kindhearted Harold (John Cho) and the lazy, fun-loving Kumar (Kal Penn). It is impossible not to root for the titular duo as their simple trip to White Castle turns into a collection of heightening misadventures. Just don't bother with the two sequels, which lose the heart of the original Harold & Kumar and instead feel like shameless cash-grabs.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    19. Hell or High Water (2016)

    Chris Pine and Jeff Bridges talking on the porch.
    CBS Films / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Westerns have essentially disappeared from movie theaters over the last decade, but Hell or High Water makes a compelling case that the genre isn't dead quite yet. Toby Howard (Chris Pine) and his brother Tanner (Ben Foster) begin robbing banks in rural Texas in order to prevent an impending foreclosure on their family ranch. The two are pursued by Texas Rangers Marcus Hamilton (Jeff Bridges) and Alberto Parker (Gil Birmingham), with the former hoping to catch them before he enjoys his well-earned retirement. Hell or High Water avoids many of the clichés found in Westerns, as the typical "good guy vs. bad guy" narrative is replaced with a more nuanced story of survival. The film is anchored by stunning cinematography and fantastic performances from the entire cast, with Bridges even earning himself an Oscar nomination. If you're looking for a Western with a distinctly modern twist, you won't do much better than this.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    20. The Iron Giant (1999)

    Hogarth Hughes and the Iron Giant trying to fix the railroad track.
    Warner Bros / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Pixar gets all of the credit for bringing an unprecedented level of complexity into American animation, and while nobody is arguing Toy Story is anything less than a masterpiece, The Iron Giant remains criminally overlooked for its role in the animation revolution of the '90s. The Dreamworks film about the unexpected friendship between a young boy named Hogarth Hughes and a 50-foot tall robot from outerspace is the directorial debut of Brad Bird, who would go on to make both Incredibles movies and Ratatouille. His expertise at balancing depth and excitement is on full display here, and its gorgeous animation style will have you in disbelief that this movie was made two decades ago. While The Iron Giant is unquestionably a kids movie, adults are likely to be every bit as drawn in by its examination of the human condition. No matter how old you are, make sure you have some tissues with you while you watch, as the ending is guaranteed to make you at least a little bit misty-eyed.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    21. Jennifer's Body (2009)

    Megan Fox and Amanda Seyfried hanging out at a bar.
    20th Century Fox / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Megan Fox has always been underrated as an actor, and nowhere is that more evident than in Jennifer's Body. Equipped with Diablo Cody's patented one-liners, Fox is firing on all cylinders as a seemingly stereotypical popular girl who is bored of everything around her and way smarter than anyone gives her credit for. Her magnetic performance proves that Fox has always been so much more than a pretty face, and the movie even features some (intentional or not) light meta-commentary on Fox's career, as everyone except Jennifer's best friend Anita (Amanda Seyfried) fails to notice that Jennifer has been possessed by a demon after an indie band tries to sacrifice her to Satan. But even as Jennifer transforms into a literal man-eater, Fox is able to bring an unexpected level of tragedy to her performance. It remains the best role of Fox's career, as she makes Jennifer equal parts hilarious, terrifying, and — against all odds — relatable.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    22. Love & Mercy (2015)

    Paul Dano looking wistfully into the distance.
    Roadside Attractions / Courtesy Everett Collection

    One of the best musician biopics ever made, Love & Mercy focuses on the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson at two distinct points in his life. First, we meet a young Brian (Paul Dano) in the '60s deciding to quit touring at the height of the band's success and instead focusing on creating the album that would eventually become Pet Sounds. Later, we see an older Brian (John Cusack) in the '80s unexpectedly connecting with Melinda Ledbetter (Elizabeth Banks), a Cadillac saleswoman. As we witness the young Brian slowly begin to break down mentally, Melinda discovers that the older Brian has become a shell of himself due to heavy medication. Both actors are phenomenal in their portrayals of Brian, but the movie ultimately belongs to Dano, who brilliantly captures the sensitive but intense and troubled nature of one of music's true geniuses in the last century. The Pet Sounds sessions are the film's highlight, as it is genuinely thrilling to watch the creation of one of the greatest albums ever made, even if it is a fictional retelling.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    23. Melancholia (2011)

    Kirsten Dunst harnessing the power of lightning.
    Magnolia Picture / Courtesy Everett Collection

    When it comes to depicting mental illness onscreen, the movie industry has a less-than-stellar track record, often resorting to lazy stereotypes or reinforcing false notions about people suffering from anxiety, depression, or any number of mental afflictions. But Melancholia is the rare exception, as Lars von Trier, the film's writer and director, manages to channel the hopeless, directionless exhaustion of a depressive episode into Justine (Kirsten Dunst). Despite being her wedding day, Justine shows no interest in her marriage, her husband, or anything else going on around her, while her family is too focused on how her behavior reflects on them to really care about her. At the same time, a rogue planet named Melancholia begins heading toward Earth, which some predict could mean the end of the world. Dunst has never been better than she is here, as she lends a sense of despondent apathy toward everything happening around her that transforms from disheartening to frightening as the world faces possible extinction.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    24. Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol (2011)

    Tom Cruise climbing a skyscraper.
    Paramount Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Before Ghost Protocol, the Mission: Impossible franchise seemed like it was on its last legs, but the fourth Ethan Hunt film gave the spy series new life and re-established Tom Cruise as a one-of-a-kind action star. While the first three movies at least attempted to be ever-so-slightly grounded in reality, director Brad Bird decided to fully abandon that strategy with Ghost Protocol by embracing over-the-top stunts and action sequences the movies have now become known for. In fact, this movie may feature the most iconic stunt of the entire franchise, with Cruise climbing the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    25. The Nice Guys (2016)

    Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling getting out of the car.
    Warner Bros / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Shane Black is one of the defining voices of the buddy cop movie, and The Nice Guys is arguably his best take on the genre. Bumbling private eye Holland March (Ryan Gosling) reluctantly teams up with Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe), a brutish enforcer, to investigate the possible death of porn star Misty Mountains (Murielle Telio). But like any good buddy cop movie, the actual plot takes a backseat to the chemistry between the lead duo, and Gosling and Crowe are sensational together. Gosling is the funniest he has ever been, as he delivers one of the best slapstick performances in recent memory. And Crowe has no problem keeping pace, giving his best performance since Master and Commander.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    26. Night of the Kings (2020)

    Issaka Sawadogo looking very nervous.
    Neon / Courtesy Everett Collection

    A new prisoner arrives at La Maca, an infamous prison in the Ivory Coast that is run by inmates, and is selected to be the new "Roman," which requires him to tell a story to the prisoners. He begins to tell the story of the death of Zama King, a leader of the gang he belonged to, but he soon learns that he must keep telling the story until dawn or he will lose his life. Night of the Kings has received widespread critical acclaim since its release, winning the African American Film Critics Association Award for Best Foreign Film and the NAACP Image Awards 2021 for Outstanding International Motion Picture.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    27. Nomadland (2020)

    Frances McDormand looking out into the distance.
    Fox Searchlight / Courtesy Everett Collection

    You know those movies that your cinephile friends have been telling you to watch for months? Nomadland is probably at the top of that list, and after a big showing at the Oscars back in April, you have no more excuses for putting it off. And once you finally watch it, you’ll wonder why you didn’t see it sooner. Based on the 2017 nonfiction book of the same name, the film centers on Fern (Frances McDormand), who sells most of her possessions and takes to life on the road shortly after losing her job. McDormand won her third Oscar for her intimate portrayal of a woman trying to rediscover her place in the world, but what’s really impressive is how well the rest of the cast keeps up with her despite being composed almost entirely of "non-actors."

    Watch it on Hulu.

    28. Palm Springs (2020)

    Cristin Milioti and Andy Samberg enjoying beer in the pool.
    Hulu / Courtesy Everett Collection

    It's November 9 and Nyles (Andy Samberg) is attending his cheating girlfriend's best friend's wedding for the thousandth (or possibly millionth) time, as he's been forced to relive the same day over and over. Nyles seems to have accepted his fate until sister of the bride Sarah (Cristin Milioti) ends up stuck in the time-loop as well. In lesser hands, this movie could easily feel unoriginal or trite, but Palm Springs proves to be a clever rom-com reimagining of Groundhog Day instead of a shameless rip-off. Having two people being stuck in an endless time-loop together instead of one poor shmuck being trapped all alone may seem like a small change, but it turns out to give the movie its own vibe entirely. Palm Springs largely ignores the self-improvement aspect of Groundhog Day in favor of addressing the complex nature of human connection. And thanks to the dynamite chemistry between Samberg and Milioti, it totally works.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    29. Parasite (2019)

    Song Kang-ho and Jang Hye-jin eating some food.
    Neon / Courtesy Everett Collection

    There's not much to say about Parasite that hasn't already been said in a million think pieces, but this is a rare film that not only meets but somehow surpasses its own massive hype. But while much of the praise goes to Bong Joon-ho, who won Best Director and Best Original Screenplay at the Oscars, the performances from the actors tend to get overlooked. The entire Kim family is outstanding, as all four actors manage to display the family's growing sense of desperation and bitterness as they try to survive their life in squalor. Park So-dam's performance as Kim Ki-jung is awardworthy, as she is able to bring in a layer of dark humor into the role while remaining entirely in character.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    30. Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)

    Adele Haenel looking back longingly.
    Neon / Courtesy Everett Collection

    If you're a sucker for once-in-a-lifetime love stories, you are going to love Portrait of a Lady on Fire. Set in France in the late 18th century, the film tells the story of Marianne (Noémie Merlant), a painter who is commissioned to paint a portrait of Héloïse (Adèle Haenel), a young aristocrat set to marry a wealthy nobleman. Romance movies have a tendency to be melodramatic, but Portrait opts for a more subtle approach, allowing the tension to grow as Marianne and Héloïse slowly gravitate towards each other. The film also makes no attempt at hiding the lack of social freedom granted to women during this time period, which adds a certain level of tragedy to the love these two share.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    31. Predator (1987)

    Carl Weathers and Arnold Schwarzenegger getting ready to fight.
    20th Century Fox Film Corp. / Courtesy Everett Collection

    An elite paramilitary rescue team, led by Alan "Dutch" Schaefer (Arnold Schwarzenegger), heads into a Central American rainforest to save a group of hostages from guerrilla insurgents. But the mission takes an unexpected turn when members of the team begin getting picked off one by one by a mysterious hunter, who Dutch eventually learns is not from this planet. Predator features a phenomenal supporting cast of consummate badasses, including Carl Weathers, Jesse Ventura, and Bill Duke, but this is clearly Schwarzenegger's movie. The future California governor is at the peak of his powers here, effortlessly carrying the movie while displaying the machismo and affability that made him the biggest action star on Earth for a solid decade. Even 34 years later, Predator remains one of the most engaging sci-fi movies ever made, as watching Schwarzenegger attempt to outwit his extraterrestrial opponent in a game of cat-and-mouse is pure entertainment.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    32. Revolutionary Road (2008)

    Michael Shannon looking displeased while sitting
    Dreamworks / Courtesy Everett Collection

    More than a decade after Titanic launched them both to superstardom, Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet reunited for this romantic drama based on the 1961 novel of the same name. But while Jack and Rose were a testament to the enduring power of true love, Frank (DiCaprio) and April (Winslet) Wheeler are a young couple struggling to keep their relationship from falling apart in the suburbs of Connecticut. Revolutionary Road takes place in the '50s, a time typically seen as the height of domestic bliss, but for Frank and April, living the American Dream feels more like a nightmare that won't end. DiCaprio and Winslet are both solid as ever, but the real surprise is that Michael Shannon manages to deliver the film's best performance as John, the couple's erratic but insightful neighbor who is deemed insane by everyone around him. Shannon earned a Best Supporting Actor nomination, proving himself to be one of the most exciting actors in the entire industry.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    33. Romeo + Juliet* (1996)

    Leonardo DiCaprio kissing Claire Danes' hand.
    20th Century Fox / Courtesy Everett Collection

    This is the way Shakespeare should be done. Director Baz Luhrman manages to make the timeless story feel modern while staying true to the original text. From the moment the Capulets and Montagues start hurling insults at each other while pumping gas, this bold, brash adaptation breathes fresh life into the classic love story almost 400 years after its original debut. Ultimately, what makes any Romeo & Juliet adaptation sink or swim is the performance of the two leads and you can't ask for much better than Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes. Their instant connection will have you believing in the enduring power of true love, even as the two lovebirds make some extremely questionable decisions as they head toward their ultimate demise.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    34. Silence (2016)

    Adam Driver and Andrew Garfield looking concerned while talking.
    Paramount Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Martin Scorsese has wrestled with faith and religion for much of his legendary film career but never as directly or deeply as he does in Silence. When Jesuit priests Sebastião Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield) and Francisco Garupe (Adam Driver) receive news that their mentor, Cristóvão Ferreira (Liam Neeson), has renounced his faith after being tortured in Japan, they embark on a journey to find him and convert the Japanese people. The duo arrive in Japan with wide-eyed confidence in their mission, but as they get deeper into their search for Ferreira, they are faced with a myriad of challenges, including the constant threat of torture. Garfield was so dedicated to his performance that he lost 40 pounds, but his commitment to the role was not enough to attract moviegoers, as Silence made only $23 million at the global box office against a $40 million to $50 million budget.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    35. Skyfall (2012)

    Daniel Craig trying to survive a shootout.
    Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    By far the best Bond film of the Daniel Craig era, Skyfall gives 007 fans everything they've come to expect from the franchise while also providing some fun new wrinkles to the mythology of everyone's favorite British spy (apologies to Austin Powers). After faking his death to escape his life of espionage and one-night stands, Bond is forced to un-retire after an MI6 building is blown up. He eventually faces off with Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem), a former agent who is hellbent on getting revenge against M (Judi Dench). Silva is the best Bond villain in decades, ranking right up there with the all-time greats like Blofeld, Goldfinger, and Jaws. From the second he appears onscreen waxing philosophical about rats, the former MI6 agent takes over the movie and even forces Bond (and, by extension, viewers) to reflect on the "by any means necessary" approach he has long embraced. Even though it goes off the rails a bit by the end, Skyfall remains entertaining from start to finish.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    36. The Social Network (2010)

    Jesse Eisenberg and Justin Timberlake hanging out in a nightclub.
    Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    An origin story about the guy who created Facebook doesn't sound that exciting, but The Social Network has managed to become one of the most beloved and respected films of the 21st century. With David Fincher directing the best script of Aaron Sorkin's career, seeing Mark Zuckerberg's meteoric rise from drunk blogger to billionaire tech genius feels almost Shakespearean. This isn't just the story of Facebook; it's a story of ambition, betrayal, and the thin line between good and great. The Social Network earned eight Academy Award nominations, winning three for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, and Best Film Editing. A trio of Oscars is nothing to sneeze at, but over a decade later, most people agree that the movie deserved a few more, including Best Picture over The King's Speech. The movie also doubles as a fascinating time capsule, as it's clear that even in 2010, nobody really understood how much social media was going to become an unavoidable part of life, for better or worse.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    37. Sorry to Bother You (2018)

    Lakeith Stanfield and Tessa Thompson having an intimate conversation.
    Annapurna Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Cash Green (LaKeith Stanfield) is a down-on-his-luck who needs a job to keep from getting kicked out of his house, which is actually just his uncle's garage. Out of pure desperation, he lands a job as a telemarketer at RegalView. At first, Cash struggles to make any sales, but when he adopts a "white voice" at the advice of another black coworker, he quickly finds himself climbing up the corporate ladder. For the first hour or so, this dark comedy seems like a clever but straightforward satire on race in America, but Boots Riley, who wrote and directed the film, ultimately goes much deeper than that. Sorry to Bother You's blend of absurdism and cynicism allows the film to examine the sinister roles race and capitalism play in modern society with remarkable insight, going beyond the surface to expose how systemic racism is intrinsically built into the parasitic and exploitative nature of the relationship between the wealthy and the working class. It's also got a twist that I pretty much guarantee you won't see coming.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    38. Take Shelter (2011)*

    Sony Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    On this list, we stan Michael Shannon. Usually, he's stealing whatever movie he's in despite being stuck in a supporting role but he gets the lead in Take Shelter. Shannon plays Curtis, a construction worker who grows increasingly paranoid when he begins having apocalyptic visions of rain "like fresh motor oil." Shannon's borderline frightening intensity is on full display here but in the lead role, he gets the time and space to let his internal terror bubble beneath the surface. This approach puts the viewer on the edge of their seat, as it feels like you are watching a ticking time bomb, just waiting for when things finally going to explode.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    39. Taken (2008)*

    Liam Neeson holding a photo of his daughter.
    20th Century Fox / Courtesy Everett Collection

    The appeal here is extremely obvious: it's fun as hell to watch Liam Neeson casually mow through a bunch of henchman around the streets of Paris on his way to rescuing his kidnapped daughter. Over a decade later, that simple formula remains incredibly effective, as Neeson is easily the greatest action movie dad of all-time. And Neeson's unexpected turn as an action star paid off at the box office, withTaken managing to rack up $226 million globally against a $25 million production budget. It also spawned two perfectly okay sequels and about a dozen other action movies that are open Taken rip-offs.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    40. The Virgin Suicides (1999)

    Kirsten Dunst laying in the grass.
    Paramount Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Based on the 1993 novel of the same name, The Virgin Suicides follows the lives of the Lisbon sisters, five teen siblings who struggle to experience independence under their parents' strict supervision. This dark coming-of-age story pulls no punches about the painful isolation of the adolescent experience. What's especially impressive is that this is Sophia Coppola's debut feature, and the fact that she was able to make such a thoughtful and visually arresting film before she was 30 is remarkable. It's rare for a first-time director to show such confidence and mastery of their craft, but you can already see that Coppola is going to have a long and successful career making somber, beautiful films with great soundtracks.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    41. Weekend at Bernie's (1989)

    Jonathan Silverman, Terry Kiser, and Andrew McCarthy relaxing on the couch.
    20th Century Fox Film Corp. / Courtesy Everett Collection

    Comedies have relied on nonsensical premises for centuries (just read the absolutely ridiculous plot summary for any Shakespeare comedy for proof), but I would argue none managed to pull off a plot as impossibly dumb as Weekend at Bernie's. Larry Wilson (Andrew McCarthy) and Richard Parker (Jonathan Silverman) are two low-level financial employees who get invited by their CEO, Bernie Lomax (Terry Kiser), to join him for the weekend at his beach house in the Hamptons. But by the time they arrive, they discover Bernie is dead, and the two make the only logical choice: pretend Bernie is alive by putting sunglasses on him and pretty much hoping nobody notices. It's a one-joke movie that you might assume would get dull almost immediately, but the level of commitment to the one joke ends up working to the movie's advantage. The longer Larry and Richard manage to trick everyone into thinking Bernie is alive with their half-baked planning, the funnier the joke becomes.

    Watch it on Hulu.

    * Denotes title has been newly added to Hulu for July

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