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A Scheme Saves Dogs From Death Row And Uses Convicts To Train Them For Adoption

Jail Dogs saves dogs from Gwinnett County Animal Control, and uses prisonsers to vet and train them so they're ready for adoption.

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Film maker Amy Jackson, who's making a documentary on the scheme, tells BuzzFeed:

Via Facebook: Jail-Dogs-In-1C

"I began shooting video of the Gwinnett Jail Dogs program when it first started in 2010.

I was working on the television show Cell Block 6. Female Lock Up on the Discovery channel which was filming in the jail. It wasn't the most uplifting show and one day my dear friend Captain Hicks, who has since died, invited me to meet the Jail Dogs."

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The dogs include her own dog Vida, who was seconds away from being euthanized when she rescued her. Below is a dog named Daria. Amy says:

Amy Jackson

"Somebody really evil chopped off Daria's ears. She is only 2 years old and has had several litters. I fell in love with her the minute I saw those big brown eyes staring at me as I was walking around the kennels giving all of the dogs treats. She was shy at first but quickly warmed up to me and I came to visit her and walk her as often as I could.

I was taking her out last weekend with an "Adopt Me" vest on, in search of that special someone to adopt her. She was on the super urgent list at Dekalb animal control and was on borrowed time. When she got in my car she did the super happy roll around and I knew it would break my heart bringing her back to Dekalb.

I got a phone saying a family was there to meet her... which really surprised me, since no one ever came to meet her - after I posted her video and pictures everywhere. I quickly turned around and brought her back and the family instantly fell in love with Daria - now named Journey."

You can watch her story here.

You can view footage of the project on Amy's YouTube channel and learn more on her Facebook page.

View this video on YouTube

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