veluriel
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    • veluriel

      I don’t really get why he calls it “fake” hand ass pinch… I mean, he really does grab these women. They’re strangers, they don’t know him, and they’re visibly confused or surprised as to why he’s touching them. And the sad part? They don’t react with anger because the idea of being polite and yielding and forgiving is so well ingrained. Why didn’t he try grabbing some men’s asses? It’s “cute” that he goes, “hey I’m sorta reality TV and internet famous so let’s hug it out ok we’re cool right?” I mean, that makes it like it never even happened at all, right? Or at least, it doesn’t count because haha it was all a “prank” for the internet and you’re actually on candid camera! So you can’t get angry! Come hug me so everyone thinks it’s cool! Uh, right.

    • veluriel

      Yeah, just checked their website. They have a handful of stores in the San Francisco area, and a handful of stores in the NY tri-state area. And their new stores? Just a short hop away in CT and PA (more CA stores in the West). Wow. And you think you can make an impact like that? Don’t get me wrong, I think they’ve got decent clothing, and their ultralight coats look kind of neat. But they’re totally screwed if they think the U.S. is concentrated in the NY metro and SF areas. Or that by having stores ONLY in those areas somehow makes your store/brand visible in America. It’s absurd. I guess you could get by on internet sales, but you’re just not going to get the brand recognition with the lukewarm efforts to sell the brand. I’ve never seen ads online for Uniqlo, and they have no stores. How do they expect Americans to SEE much less BUY their products?

    • veluriel

      4. The youngest is also expected to serve the tea (children excluded). 5. Oolong. 6. Do NOT do this with metal teapots. I accidentally lifted my pinkie while pouring tea from a metal teapot as a child and still have a scar. 8. I was out to dim sum with family once, and saw a woman (non-Asian) holding her teapot out, waving it around asking for tea. It was pretty amusing. 11. Not always, but if you’re eating banquet-style then yes. 20. Epic battles, conniving underhanded tricks…
      My great-aunt once handed over her credit card secretly before we even ordered the food, just to beat my grandmother to the check. My grandmother once had the staff come to the table and tell her she had a phone call, just to sneak over and pay the bill. I have been told by my father to physically wrestle a bill out of my uncle’s hands. (It’s mostly a game for us, but my father greatly enjoys winning.) It’s funnier when it’s your grandmother and your great-aunt though. Watching two little old Chinese ladies muttering under their breath at each other in an “aggressive-yet-polite-ish” way while playing tug-o-war with a check is hilarious as a child. (Probably still hilarious as an adult actually…) 21. At a banquet, you’ll probably get red bean soup. Just out to dinner eating family style, usually fruit. In summer you can get watermelon or honeydew. Some restaurants just use oranges year round. And some restaurants *do* give out fortune cookies (at least in NYC) in addition to fruit.

    • veluriel

      I already agreed that there was a crime. The point is that parents need to spend more time watching their kids. I already said that I don’t place responsibility for the razor blades on the parent, but if he wasn’t close enough to notice the razor blades, would he have been close enough to catch his two-year-old falling off a platform or climbing (and falling off) monkey bars s/he’s not old enough for? It’s not a pointless question. We can sit here and dogpile the criminal that put razor blades there, sure. It’s very easy to get a resounding echo chamber there, as I can’t think of any rational human being who would sympathize with the fucker that put razor blades on a children’s playground. Or we can learn more information by, you know, asking questions? Do we not seek out more information, ever? A lack of asking questions is how we end up with crazy news cycles that lack veracity due to an absence of fact-checking. We have to be willing to ask questions because the news outlets sure aren’t.

    • veluriel

      My point was that a TWO-year-old should be pretty carefully supervised at a park REGARDLESS of the razor blades. Two-year-olds lack the kind of coordination or awareness that even a five- or six-year-old has. Hell, you have to watch them whenever they’re near STAIRS. A playground with monkey bars, elevated platforms, etc.? Yeah. And you’re right — we have no idea what the father was doing; which is precisely why I asked that exact question: “What was the father doing?” It wasn’t sarcasm, I was genuinely asking. Because there’s a big difference in how you handle a two-year-old at a playground compared to older children.

    • veluriel

      So as to not piss anyone off: Oh look, I agree with everyone else saying that whoever did this is a fucked up asshole. (Not as though there’s a lack of people saying that, and I sincerely doubt anyone seriously thinks otherwise.) Now, my question is this — What was the father doing? The child is two, wouldn’t you be right next to her/him while s/he plays on the equipment? Wouldn’t you notice something? It’s one thing to sit on a bench when a five- or six-year-old runs off, it’s another to not notice that your two-year-old is playing on equipment with razor blades glued all over it. I don’t know, maybe my priorities are fucked up, but I think parents are taking a backseat on parenting these days. It’s not the world’s job to raise your kid, it’s yours. And no, I’m not saying that he’s to blame for the injuries caused by the razor blades (placed by an asshole). But what if the kid had fallen from a high platform? The monkey bars? The kid is TWO! Playgrounds are dangerous for children that small even without razor blades glued on! tl;dr Pay attention to your small children, they can get hurt even in the safest of places. (Although I wouldn’t necessarily say that a playground is all that “safe” anyway.)

    • veluriel

      Some drag queens *are* transgender. Generally speaking, anyone who is comfortable “playing” with gender, presentation, and gender roles, could possibly be non-binary and may or may not consider themselves trans. The fact is that we, as a society, do not get to tell individual people what they are or aren’t. And if a drag queen identifies as trans, genderfluid, NB, etc. there’s nothing wrong with it. Instead of being inclusive here, you’ve drawn dividing lines. This quiz is teetering close to dogmatic, in terms of defining what “qualifies” as “trans” and veers into the dangerously growing internet phenomenon of a trans hierarchy, where individuals are judged based on just “how trans” they are. Don’t let yourself fall into that mindset. Just accept people for who they are and respect them for it.

    • veluriel

      I think the difference there (Beckham/underwear) is that the target purchaser is actually… men. The complaint is that nude/scantily clad women are essentially used as attention-bait to sell a wide variety of products to men. In contrast, you don’t see nude/scantily clad men in random ads trying to sell products to women. The only time you see nude/scantily clad men in ads is to sell products such as underwear to men — and only because it makes sense to sell underwear with models in their underwear.

    • veluriel

      At the risk of being called a “radical feminazi”… this makes me uncomfortable. I didn’t realize that this picture was about a random man basically assaulting a random woman on the street, and then walking away like “whatever.” I mean, just look at the clenched fist she has. She basically just endured it, knowing she couldn’t do anything about it. And nowadays we love to trot this photo out as “romantic.” Kinda squicky now. [snark]But of course, don’t forget to beat up on me because the man is dead and aren’t I being such a bitch?[/snark]

    • veluriel

      “Scheme” tends to have an inherent negative connotation. I think sticking with “program” (since that’s what it is) sounds much more positive. A Scheme Saves Dogs From Death Row And Uses Convicts To Train Them For Adoption vs. Touching Program Connects Death Row Dogs With Convicts Who Train Them for Adoption Non-Profit Program Rescues Death Row Dogs By Having Convicts Train Them For Adoption What Are “Jail Dogs?”
      Filmmaker Amy Jackson brings us inside this charitable program that unites dogs destined for death with inmates tasked with training and preparing them for adoption.(tagline) Jail Dogs - Rescuing Doomed Dogs And Convicts Alike
      etc. I just feel like you should spend some more time thinking about how you say things, because the words you choose inevitably skew the perception of the message you’re sending.

    • veluriel

      “I’ve said it before, but it’s akin to admiring a painting in a museum: I don’t necessarily want to touch it or buy it, but I appreciate it, from afar, and feel like I have the right to comment about it, even if I have no idea what I’m talking about.” I agree with the painting analogy, mostly because I can see it applied to others. I think it’s natural to find people attractive, but not be attracted to them. For example, I may find many women to be beautiful (and therefore attractive) akin to the way I admire a painting, but I’m neither romantically or sexually attracted to them. “that’s why Jennifer Lawrence or Cate Blanchett will never be described in that way.” I’ve used the painting analogy before, and I think you need to look past the idea that it’s *only* being used here. Appreciating human beauty as one would appreciate art is neither new nor offensive. It’s simply one way to view beauty and attractiveness. I use it to describe women all the time, as a way to frame their beauty in a way that acknowledges that I view them as “attractive” without ascribing any “attraction” on my part.

    • veluriel

      A lot of this stuff crops up because Tumblr is becoming famous for its “Social Justice Warriors” (SJWs). They’re the types who have usually just gotten onto the “society sucks, treats non-conformists like shit, we should be angry” train. So rather than do actual work to help marginalized groups, they spend their time talking down anyone who happens to belong to a majority group. So you get the crazy bad “feminists” that this comic is criticizing, and you get the critics who are too often silenced because they happen to belong to Privileged Group (X). It’s ironic, and would be funny if not sad. But we can only hope they grow out of it.

    • veluriel

      Some of these seem a little uncomfortably close to consistently blaming the “lonely” person — as if all lonely people are creatures of self-victimization. It’s almost trivializing and portrays lonely people as jackasses who shun people and then whine about being lonely. Surely there are plenty of people who fit that particular mold, but it’s rude to blanket all “lonely” people with such a stereotype. I mean really, taken as a set, these boil down to “It’s your own damn fault you’re ‘lonely’ because you’re a mean, fat, lazy, self-pitying mass of loser.” I’d have rather seen some ideas that show how “being alone” is not equivalent to “being lonely.” Or at least the idea that one can be lonely without being a jerk.

    • veluriel

      The article is titled “Perfect places for a tattoo.” Realistically speaking, they didn’t talk about that at all. Instead of actually talking about tattooing, pain levels by area, or varying longevity by area, all they did was compile a bunch of “artsy” photographs from pinterest or tumblr. And I believe all you did was repeat what I said…? (“everyone gets old.”) And when you have tattoos, those permanent ink marks will age with you, creating varying degrees of warping depending on A) where you got it (which is what this “listicle” is supposed to be about) B) how you age (genetics, sun exposure, etc.). My critique is on the article itself - purporting to offer “perfect places” for a tattoo, yet providing no reason as to why they’re “perfect” and in fact are not necessarily optimal.

    • veluriel

      I don’t think these people have thought about sagging. Your skin won’t be smooth forever. Although the amount of sagging/wrinkling varies, everyone gets old. The thigh, stomach, hip region is pretty much guaranteed to sag and warp over time. Sorry, that’s just life. And echo to those who commented about visible tattoos preventing you from getting certain jobs. (Hands + any area you can’t easily cover up) Society may be more accepting of tattoos/tattooing, but it still doesn’t fly in the professional sphere.

    • veluriel

      Can’t tell if you’re serious, but I guess I’ll have a go… Virginia and West Virginia are individual states within the country of the United States. Crimea is a region of Ukraine that simply maintains strong ethnic and socio-political ties to Russia. But Russia and Ukraine are each independent sovereign states. If you read point 31, you’ll see that Russia gave Crimea to Ukraine in 1954, with Ukraine declaring independence in 1991. Hence why it’s a big deal that Russia has essentially invaded Ukraine under the guise of “protecting Russian-identifying ethnic groups.”

    • veluriel

      I think the reason why people “single out” Israel is because it is the beneficiary of so much U.S. support. The other countries in the Middle East are merely tolerated; we deal with them because they have money and resources we need (oil). But Israel receives substantial financial and political support from the U.S. — opening it up to a wider array of criticism than a country like Saudi Arabia, which is hardly considered “friendly” with the U.S. So Israel is in fact held to a higher standard. And when they fail to meet that standard, they’re openly criticized and sanctioned for it. Israel’s location is irrelevant — they act and expect to be treated as a “Western” nation, then complain when they’re criticized by “the West” for having complicated and controversial policies. (Admittedly, much of this controversy has arisen because of the rising radical right-wing in Israel.) Don’t get me wrong — anti-semitism exists, it’s a serious problem, and anti-semites are assholes. But be careful where you swing that “double standard” sword, because it’s double-edged too.

    • veluriel

      “We’ll let the politicians do the politics,” he said. “Obviously, we are disappointed that at the moment the politics is overshadowing what is a fantastic sporting event that can change the perceptions and attitudes toward disabled people around the world.” Hmm, while I think it’s somewhat disappointing for the athletes, I can hardly agree with the idea that this is somehow “politicizing” or even grandstanding. There is a serious and legitimate threat going on in the Ukraine. Russia has literally invaded the Crimea. To say that the military measures being taken, the still-fresh aftermath of the revolution in Ukraine, the continuing protester occupation of Maidan square, or the fresh memory of the deaths that occurred in the last month can be boiled down to “politics” is absurd. There is far more at stake here than the games. Is it sad? Yes. Disappointing? Absolutely. But death and the threat of violence, war, and more death is somewhat more pressing. I understand that the Olympics are supposed to be about fostering international relations, but we operate in the real world, even as we strive for idealism. Go about your business, win your medals, and hope that no one dies. I’m sure the President will be happy to meet with you when you’re back on American soil.

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