LeighA
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    • LeighA

      “7. And then getting disconnected when your mom picked up the phone.” I see this a lot on lists like this, but this never happened to me. When we had dial-up, if someone picked up the phone while someone was on the internet, you just heard a staticky-sound instead of a dial tone. It didn’t affect the internet at all. So why did it apparently disconnect some people, but didn’t work that way for us?

    • LeighA

      1. Define “promiscuous.” Do you mean anyone who has sex with strangers, anyone who has sex outside of a relationship, anyone who has sex with more than a certain number of partners (and how many—20, 10, 5, 2, 1?), or anyone who has sex outside of marriage? Everyone seems to define it differently, so we need to know what we’re talking about here. 2. What are the consequences of promiscuity? I don’t mean possible pregnancy or STDs—those are largely preventable, and can happen even if you aren’t promiscuous. Why is being promiscuous (as you define it) “damaging…emotionally [and] physically, as well as..damaging to their friends, and family, future spouses, and eventually, future children”? I’m not the sort of person who can understand why someone would want to have sex with a stranger (I wouldn’t want a stranger to see me naked, period), but I can’t even begin to think of a way being promiscuous (again, whatever that means to you) would be damaging to your friends. It shouldn’t affect them at all. Who cares that much about their friends’ sex lives? It shouldn’t have much, if any, effect on your family or future kids, either (unless it causes your future kids, I guess).  It would only affect your future spouse inasmuch as they might care that you were promiscuous (and would be affected by any potential STDs, but you only have to have sex one time with one person to get an STD, so that doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with promiscuity). But I think it’d be best if promiscuous people married people who were either promiscuous themselves, or are at the very least completely okay with it, the same way religious people should marry religious people or people who are okay with them being religious, and people who don’t want kids should marry other people who don’t want kids or don’t really care either way. It’s a compatibility issue, not a right vs wrong issue.

    • LeighA

      Purebreds are notorious for having serious health issues (like hip dysplasia, breathing problems, etc). Mixed breeds generally help make for healthier dogs. You do have to be careful, though. Mixing a tiny dog and a huge dog is not a great idea, for obvious reasons. Dogs range from about 3 pounds to well over 200 pounds, and breeding anything with that kind of size difference is just asking for trouble.

    • LeighA

      If you wear sunscreen like the experts suggest, it’s expensive no matter what kind you buy. An 8 oz. bottle of Banana Boat Sport is about $8, and they say you’re supposed to put on about 1 oz. every 2 hours (http://www.aad.org/media-resources/stats-and-facts/prevention-and-care/sunscreens). That means a single $8 bottle is only supposed to last 16 hours.  If you spend an average of an hour a day outside all summer, following sunscreen guidelines, you’ll spend about $50 per person on sunscreen. If you spend a lot of time outdoors, say an average of 16 hours a week, that’s about $100 per person. If you spend an extraordinarily high amount of time outside (most likely because you work outside, or don’t work and spend all your time at the beach), you’re talking around $300 per person. And that’s ignoring the recommendation to reapply every time you swim or sweat, because I don’t want to bother trying to calculate that.

    • LeighA

      They really aren’t the same, though. They both involve teens falling in love and cancer, but that’s really about it. (Note: I’ve read both books but only seen A Walk to Remember. I’ve read that book a couple times and seen the movie a bunch, but it’s been awhile.) In A Walk to Remember, Landon doesn’t know Jamie has cancer at first, whereas in The Fault in Our Stars, they both have cancer and meet at a support group. Jamie’s cancer is a big, heart-wrenching reveal that takes the story from “tough guy falls for quiet religious girl” to “oh god this is going to end in tears, isn’t it?”, whereas cancer is woven through Hazel and Gus’s lives from the very beginning.  Jamie and Landon fall for each other while rehearsing a play together, Hazel and Gus really bond over a book and a trip to Europe to meet the author (and their shared experience of having cancer). And it’s not like the play and Europe are just convenient things to move the plot along. Both directly affect how the characters interact and how they see things. AWtR is big on faith and optimism and the idea that God is still there and still important even while Jamie faces a high probability of dying young. TFiOS is about people who aren’t really sure what having cancer means for the idea of God, but certainly aren’t embracing it as being part of some big cosmic plan. The kids in TFiOS get mad about having cancer, while Jamie mostly just peacefully accepts it. And, well, the endings are a bit different. Keeping spoilers to a minimum, AWtR is about giving Jamie’s life a happy (if early) ending. That doesn’t really happen in TFiOS. They have happiness, but there’s an underlying idea that ultimately it doesn’t end happily, because it never does.

    • LeighA

      “When you used the landline before 6pm.” I take it that costs extra in the UK? In the US, it’s only cell phones where time of day matters (or mattered, I should say, since they’re going towards unlimited minutes now). I looked it up and apparently you have to choose between unlimited weekend, unlimited nights and weekends, and unlimited anytime to UK landlines with discounts for mobile? In the US, you get unlimited local calls and you can pay a bit extra for unlimited long distance, plus calls to cell phones are just like calls to landlines. It does seem like it’s cheaper there, though, even if it is more complicated.

    • LeighA

      When I was in high school (in the US), we had police come and show us PSAs about not driving while drunk, distracted, etc, and they showed one class (not mine, but some of my friends were in it) a British PSA. All anyone could talk about after was how extraordinarily graphic it was compared to ours. I never saw it, so I’m not sure exactly what it showed, but I get the impression this sort of thing is pretty common there. I guess it makes sense that Ireland would be the same way. I wonder why our PSAs are so much tamer.

    • LeighA

      Harry Potter isn’t just a “series of novels for kids.” It’s a series that’s been around for almost 20 years and has books, movies, and a theme park (which these people were in the middle of while being asked these questions, no less), and has a massive following. It’s one of the most popular franchises ever, so it’s a pretty prominent part of our culture. And lots of adults like it—every single person in my family does. My grandpa watches the movies practically every time they’re on TV (which is a lot). Given where they were, I would almost guarantee they could see something with the word Gryffindor or quidditch on it as they were standing there unable to think of those words. Even if they couldn’t, they would’ve seen something just moments earlier. They also made it clear that their kids knew the answers to the questions. Didn’t they watch the movies with their kids? That seems like something most parents would do. They had to have seen them at least once. I can see not remembering every detail, but to not be able to remember Ron’s name after 8 movies seems weird to me.

    • LeighA

      Right. The hundreds of different kinds of Android phones all look like toys, but the iPhone totally doesn’t. Hmm. Seriously though, can we stop with the “Apple is for babies,” “No, Android’s for babies” nonsense? They’re different, and they’re suited to different purposes. If you want a phone with a good camera, decent stability, and no ability to customize it beyond picking your wallpaper, get an iPhone. If you want a more customizable phone, widgets, the ability to not have everything you download on your homescreen at all times, and the ability to choose how big it is, how it looks, and which features are prioritized (by buying a different phone), with (admittedly) slightly less stability, get an Android. I guess it doesn’t matter now, but personally, the fact that the iPhone keyboard doesn’t have punctuation right up front would drive me crazy. I still think the lack of an app menu is ridiculous. But to each their own. They’re both good, just different. And why is the “iPhones are overpriced” thing still being thrown around? If you buy a phone on contract, they cost exactly the same as the majority of Android phones people buy. There are cheaper low-end phones on Android, but the iPhone certainly isn’t any more expensive than the S5 or the M8 or anything like that.

    • LeighA

      He’s 9. Most young kids have a pretty high opinion of themselves. Not only that, but considering he’s skipped 5 grades, odds are he’s been told his entire life (directly and indirectly) that he’s unusually smart. It takes kids awhile to learn what is and is not considered socially acceptable. Gifted kids have to be taught (usually as a result of other kids making fun of them, unfortunately) how to act in a way that isn’t off-putting to other people. But honestly, he’s no more arrogant than any other 9 year old. Most 9 year olds are pretty full of themselves. It’s just that he’s arrogant in a more articulate, adult way that comes across as less cute and more obnoxious than the way his peers act.

    • LeighA

      I disagree. Some people thrive in small towns, others in urban areas, and others somewhere in the middle. If you take a farmer and plunk him down in Manhattan, chances are he’ll be miserable, and the same goes for someone in the reverse situation. Sometimes people grow up in an area that is too rural, urban, or suburban for them to really feel comfortable there. When you’re in that situation, it can feel pretty stifling, and getting out of there to a place more like your ideal is so freeing.

    • LeighA

      What do you mean, does anyone plan their own schedule? Did you not sign up for classes every semester at your school?  I’ve attended two colleges (I transferred sophomore year), and everyone was responsible for planning their own schedule every semester (except, if I remember correctly, the school I transferred to did first semester freshmen’s schedules for them). How flexible that schedule was depended on your major and what was offered that semester, but if you had a major with a lot of people in it, you could usually manage at least one semester with a day off or with no morning classes. It was less likely with smaller majors because they usually had very limited course offerings so you had to take what you could get, but sometimes you could luck into days off. I never got Fridays off (most of my classes were MWF), and I liked morning classes (although I would’ve liked to have taken Calc II later than 8 am), but I did have Thursdays off one semester, with only one class on Tuesday. If I remember correctly, I had approximately every other Thursday off one other semester, because I had chem lab every other Thursday and physics labs on random Thursdays (usually on chem days). The labs were 3 hours apiece so I couldn’t schedule much around them.

    • LeighA

      As far as I can tell, this is a mixture of words most commonly used by people over 60 say, ridiculous new slang that I’ve never actually heard anyone say but have (for some of them, at least) seen online a couple times, and words I’ve never seen or heard before in my life. “Clutch” is the closest to being a normal word, but it doesn’t seem to be defined right because it says it’s an adjective(the parts of speech were given, right? not guessed?) but we usually say things like “He came through in the clutch.” “Down to clown” was easy to guess the meaning of, because it means the same as just “down,” as in “Are you down?” but I’ve never heard of it and it sounds silly. I’ve never heard of “packie” before, but I imagine asking a Brit to define it could’ve been a bit awkward.

    • LeighA

      You say common sense, but I think you overestimate how clear rhyming slang is to those who aren’t familiar with it. Most Americans, unless they read or watch old British books and movies, will basically never have heard any rhyming slang, and if they aren’t informed that’s what it is, they’re going to just assume it’s a normal slang word, which makes figuring out what it means pretty tough. That said, that’s a pretty easy one to get, since finishing “Scooby” with “Doo” is pretty obvious. I’d bet a lot of people would be able to figure it out if they were told it was rhyming slang and had even the slightest idea how that works.

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