BustyStClair
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    • BustyStClair

      Of course you should be gluten-free if you have celiac disease. If you’re going gluten-free for any other reason, then quit whining. And yes, there are SO many people doing it because it is trendy. There are simply not that many people with celiac disease. Vegetarians and vegans get chastised for whining about lack of options and for lording their dietary superiority over other people, and those same standards should apply to gluten-free-by-choice people. I don’t give a crap if you are vegan/vegetarian/gluten-free/whatever, as long as you don’t try to draw everyone’s attention to your situation. Stfu about it, please. You are not a victim.

    • BustyStClair

      I’m a paralegal, and 9 times out of 10, guests in the office will walk right past the male front desk receptionist and ask me for coffee, copies, lunch menus, etc. When I point them towards the male receptionist, the response is almost always, “But I don’t want to bother him if he’s busy.” Seriously? It’s his job to take care of things like that. His nameplate even says “RECEPTIONIST” in big ol’ letters. Mine says “PARALEGAL.” What makes you think I’m less busy and less likely to be bothered by your dumb ass? Because I have boobs and a vagina? Both genders are equally guilty of this.

    • BustyStClair

      This whole story is just a load of bull. Taylor is one of Mitch McConnell’s political puppets, and he’s probably being financially backed by the Koch brothers and the insurance lobby as well. B*tch and moan all you want. People did the same thing when Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security were implemented.  How about some stories showing the positive side of the ACA for once? My previous insurance company tried to raise my rates for NO REASON. I could not get an answer out of anyone at the company, other than they had to raise their rates because of the ACA. I canceled my policy and found a new one on my state’s exchange website in about 20 minutes. My deductible went from $5,000 to $750, my premiums went from $600/month to $90/month, and all of my preventative care is covered 100%, even before I reach my deductible. I have helped several friends and family members shop for new policies, and each one of them has found something better than they had before.  As far as I’m concerned, all of the ACA nay-sayers are just burying their heads in the sand and refusing to see the reality of the situation. If your insurance company tries to raise your rates without giving you a specific reason, then GO FIND A BETTER POLICY. They do exist, I promise. If you choose not to, that is your fault and not the fault of the law, Obama, Congress, or anyone else.

    • BustyStClair

      No, insurance companies don’t have to raise their rates. They are arbitrarily doing so to make the ACA look bad. Can you tell me one single provision of the ACA that requires insurance companies to raise their rates? Maybe if their upper management and CEOs weren’t pocketing billions of dollars in profits, the insurance companies in question could actually afford to insure their customers like they are supposed to.  It’s also really telling that you can’t respond to someone’s comment without calling them an idiot. Totally rational.

    • BustyStClair

      Working in family law, I will never assume that cases like this are black and white. Of course there are a lot of details we’re not getting in this instance. The tax situation could be particularly tricky for her parents, especially if this girl files her own tax return after working at TGIF. Also, children don’t have to live with you at all for you to be able to claim them on your taxes, and many parents continue to claim their children while they are attending college.  All of the people ranting for this girl to pay her own way through college are not taking the FAFSA into account at all. In general, I think FAFSA law needs a serious overhaul. If her parents make too much money, she’s not going to get any grants or need-based scholarships. If her parents have poor credit, she might not even be able to get loans.  I also know that in my state/county, her parents would be ordered to continue paying her private high school tuition. In this state, she would still be considered a dependent person if she was attending high school, and her parents are the ones that originally enrolled her in that private school.

    • BustyStClair

      Initial impressions of this “brat” aside, her parents might still have a legal duty to her. In many states, 18 year-olds are still considered dependent persons until they graduate (or their class graduates) from high school. I worked on a case similar to this. The father was charged with abandonment of a dependent person for locking his 18 year-old daughter out of the house and telling her to go live with her mother.  And do you suppose her parents are still going to claim her for their tax return? I would almost bet that they will. If she had a better attorney, they would get her emancipated so she doesn’t have to use her parents’ income information for her FAFSA. Then she could probably go to college on need-based grants and scholarships, rather then suing her parents for technical abandonment.