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    45 Shows You Can Watch On Amazon Prime But Not Netflix

    From classics like The Sopranos and The Wire to newer hits like The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Humans (and everything in between), Prime Video has got you covered.

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    1. Bosch — a Prime Original series that centers around LAPD homicide detective Harry Bosch and his quest to seek justice, no matter what forces are against him.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 4 (ongoing)

    Based on the best-selling police procedural book series by author Michael Connelly, each season of Bosch revolves around one to two central cases that deeply affect Bosch on a personal level.

    Promising review: "This television series captures the 'essence' of Bosch from every angle: experienced police detective, divorced father with a daughter; cordial relationship (mostly) with the ex-wife who is a police profiler in her earlier life; and frequently insubordinate but results-driven investigator. Every actor is incredible in this series, which is saying something. In Bosch's world, most things are black and white. Right or wrong and no in-between. Life doesn't work quite that easily, which is why Bosch struggles. Titus Welliver does a great job of capturing this character's sentiments, his energy, and his drive. 'Everyone counts or no one counts.' In law enforcement, we never really articulated it in such a well-crafted motto, but we did live and work by it. Michael Connelly should be pleased with this series, the director, and cast. They really hit it out of the park. Cheers!" —David Crawford

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    2. The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel — the tale of Miriam "Midge" Maisel, a Jewish housewife living on the Upper West Side in the 1950s, who discovers her talent for stand-up comedy under the most unfortunate of circumstances.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 1 (ongoing)

    This critically acclaimed show is created by Amy Sherman-Palladino, who also created Gilmore Girls.

    Promising review: "So many shows, even shows that I love, retread common ground, but The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is something completely different. It follows the social upheaval and subsequent comedic rise of the titular Mrs. Maisel, which would be novel enough in and of itself, but given that it's also set in the late 1950s, the viewer is treated to a rather unique experience. Of course, the show is written in the classic, loquacious Palladino/Sherman-Palladino patter, but all of the actors, especially Rachel Brosnahan and Alex Borstein, excel in their delivery, therefore adding to show's delightful quirkiness. But this show isn't just quirky. It's clever and thoughtful, and it deals with the gender dynamics of the age in a way that feels relevant and relatable even today. Did I mention it's also funny? And the costumes? Just watch it!" —BookGal123

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    3. Suits — a legal drama about an unconventional duo who work together to serve justice: Harvey Specter, a hotshot Manhattan corporate lawyer, and Mike Ross, a brilliant college dropout with an eidetic memory who doesn't actually have a law degree — but they're keeping that a secret.

    usanetwork.com

    Seasons: 7 (ongoing)

    Meghan Markle, now the Duchess of Sussex, was a series regular until the latest season.

    Promising review: "Far and away the best series we've ever seen! We've been binge-watching since we saw the pilot. We're totally hooked on the witty sarcastic banter and the twists and turns in the plot lines. As individual characters are developed, we fall in love with them and want their storyline to go a particular direction, only for it to go a different way. There isn't just one stand-out actor, there is an ensemble of incredibly talented actors. Their talent coupled with great writing make this series incredible. Seriously, we're binge-watching four episodes a night." —Amazon Customer

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    4. Fleabag — a British dramedy about a young woman trying to overcome trauma and deal with day-to-day life in London. It's both funny and sad (and often NSFW).

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 1 (ongoing)

    Promising review: "Biting honesty and dark, dry wit. Definitely not written for an American laugh track audience, and I am so grateful! Binge-watched to the last lovely moment and certainly hope to see more. The real payoff comes very gradually throughout all six episodes but your reward for waiting will be worth it.

    Phoebe Waller-Bridge is an exceedingly talented actress as well as writer. I'm not, so I'll keep it short. But if you've truly got a heart and have made enough of your own mistakes to understand some of hers, there's a good chance you'll like this." —karen

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    5. Sneaky Pete — a show centered around a con man who assumes the identity of his cellmate Pete, in order to escape from a vicious gangster. He "reunites" with Pete's estranged family... but they're not simple folk either.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 2 (ongoing)

    This show is created by Davide Shore (the brains behind popular medical drama House) and Bryan Cranston, who also plays the aforementioned gangster aka the main antagonist in the show.

    Promising review: "Sneaky Pete will surprise even the most seasoned of TV junkies. While some moments were predictable, the show genuinely left me in suspense. The great acting (from everyone) pulls you into a dramatic plot where no one is who you think they are. You care about most of the characters and end up unsure who to root for." —HDB

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    6. Grimm — a fantasy police drama revolving around Nick Burkhardt, a Portland homicide detective who discovers he's descended from a line of ancient guardians who slay evil mythological creatures.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 6

    It's inspired by Grimm's Fairy Tales and sometimes the plotlines are, well, grim.

    Promising review:
 "This is such a great TV show. I was not sure what to expect at first, but they did an amazing job incorporating all of the tales that we loved growing up into a dark and macabre version of modern day society. It is so interesting to watch, and I have many 'AHA' moments when I realize the different characters. I personally love it, and if you enjoy crime shows and fantasy...this is the show for you!" —Will and Kat

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    7. The Wire — a critically acclaimed detective drama (written by author and former police reporter David Simon) set in the city of Baltimore and focusing on a different theme each season.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 5

    Promising review:
 "Hands down the best show ever. I have recommended The Wire to literally dozens of people, and all have come back with the same opinion, 'It's amazing!' The characters, the interweaving storylines, the lack of network TV bull. You will never watch another cop show again without it feeling silly and unrealistic compared to The Wire. Law and Order, CSI, and all the rest will seem like they were made for children after watching all five seasons of this show. Complex? Yes. Difficult to follow? Not at all. Deep characters? All of them, but not silly over-characterization you'd find on network TV — they all seem real and most are based on real people. It may take a couple of episodes to really get into it, but I guarantee after four episodes you'll be hooked and you'll be sad it ends after season five. Not because it's unsatisfying, but you'll feel so invested into so many characters it's hard to see them go. Almost every aspect of the dark side of modern society is touched on but without any preachy editorializing. It's just there in all its grayness and ambiguity for the viewer to decide right and wrong, good and evil." —JL Brown

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    8. The Good Wife — a drama starring Emmy Award-winner Julianna Margulies as a wife and mother who resumes a legal career after her husband goes to jail over a very public sex and political corruption scandal.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 7

    Promising review: "I heard so much buzz about The Good Wife that I finally decided I needed to give it a look. I was hooked from the first episode, and I usually don't expect much from any TV series' opener. I expected Julianna Margulies to be good — I've always liked her — but she's far better than good; she's excellent. The really great thing about The Good Wife is that everyone else is good, too, even Chris Noth. I have to admit, I'm not a big Chris Noth fan, but he's better in this series than I've ever seen him. I've only watched about half a dozen episodes so far, and I'm looking forward to many more to enjoy. If you've hesitated to try this series for any reason, give it about 50 minutes. It's not just another lawyer show; it's a cut above." —BKR

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    9. The Sopranos — the iconic HBO crime drama about Tony Soprano, a mob boss who struggles to balance two families — his own and the mafia. It's widely regarded as one of the greatest TV series of all time.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 6

    Promising review: "The amazing thing about this show is that you fall in love with the characters when many of them are deeply flawed and even terrible. It is a violent show — it'd be difficult to have a show about the mafia without violence. But, from my point of view, none of the violence is there to be entertaining. Edie Falco is breathtaking as Carmela Soprano. I cannot say enough about how talented she is. James Gandolfini flawlessly portrays a man whom you're not sure you should pity, love, or despise. And, it's left up to you to decide if he's a sociopath or a victim of his upbringing and culture. In the past, I've shied away from shows where I knew no good outcome was possible. But, the story of The Sopranos is utterly compelling. Even in its darkness, it has hints of joy, love, and hope." —Sortafairytale

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    10. Deadwood — a gritty period drama set in 1870s South Dakota, where a gold rush leads a group of misfits to form a lawless mining settlement.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 3

    

Promising review:
 "As a fan of Western dramas and history, I am hooked on Deadwood. I can imagine the constant state of moral conflict encountered by people of this era in history, and that aspect is perfectly captured in this drama. The characters are richly drawn and compelling, and the performances given by the cast are among the best television has to offer. Study up on your Western slang if you want to get the full effect and depth of the show." —Adam12

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    11. Mad Dogs — an island-vacation-gone-wrong dark comedy/thriller (set in beautiful Belize) featuring a dysfunctional group of male friends who get themselves into a lot of trouble. Like The Hangover, but more intense.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 1

    In addition to adrenaline-pumping action and gorgeous scenery, you'll get lots of character development as the four friends reconnect and are forced to rely on each other in dire situations.

    Promising review: "This was a cast of the most dysfunctional characters, friends that hadn't interacted with each other in a long time, coming together to visit a common friend (played by Billy Zane) now living the life in Belize. There are twists and turns in every episode... mostly going downhill. It's a study of five people (well, mostly four) learning, reconnecting, and growing through terrible situations, some out of their control and some self-made. There is a lot of underlying dark comedy buried in this that will find you chuckling to yourself when you should probably be horrified. I definitely give this a 5-star rating. I was so hooked I binge-watched this in one day." —Diperpiper

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    12. Boardwalk Empire — a show set in Atlantic City during the Prohibition era as Enoch "Nucky" Thompson rises to prominence as the city's corrupt treasurer and most powerful political figure.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 5

    The main character was based on historical figure Enoch L. Johnson, a politician, businessman, and crime boss from Atlantic City.

    Promising review:
 "Boardwalk Empire is an excellent story of broken families, broken people, and broken promises set in Atlantic City, NJ, at the beginning of Prohibition. Steve Buscemi stretches his acting chops across the complex character of Enoch 'Nucky' Thompson, the city treasurer and machine boss of the city's graft network. Both likable and detestable, Nucky's interactions with rival bosses, chiefs of industry and politics, and the less-than-trustworthy members of his extended family will keep your attention for the entire season. The remarkable special effects used to create a near-seamless vision of the 1920s boardwalk are astonishing. Highly recommended for when you want to see many hours of quality entertainment." —The TV Single Dad

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    13. The Grand Tour — a British motoring series produced and hosted by the same team formerly behind BBC's hit show Top Gear. Watch if you like not-too-cheesy friendship, exotic locations, and supercars.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 2 (ongoing)

    You don't even need to be a fan of cars to enjoy this show, TBH.

    Promising review: "I liked the old show (Top Gear) not because I'm a car fan (I'm not), but because James, Richard, and Jeremy have always had such a fun, enthusiastic, great time with each other. They are all incredibly talented experts, and I love that Amazon has kept the family together! After watching the first episode of The Grand Tour, I realized something about this NEW and IMPROVED show. This is the one and only show I've watched in literally years that actually makes me laugh OUT LOUD! Every single episode makes me laugh. Out. Loud. Seriously. I love that the boys can play hard, explore the world, insult, criticize, and one-up each other, blow stuff up, catch stuff on fire, sleep under their cars, and at the end of the day, they are still best mates, ready to head to the pub or tackle the next challenge." —Amazon Customer

    Watch here (only available for Prime members).

    14. Vikings — a show following the story of Ragnar Lothbrok, a farmer who rises to fame by leading successful raids into England and eventually becomes a Scandinavian king.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 5 (ongoing)

    This series is inspired by the Norse saga of legendary Viking ruler Ragnar Lothbrok, who may have lived during the 9th century.

    Promising review: "Great cinematography, breathtaking settings, perfect casting, and solid directing are the basis for this series. Include captivating writing with fantastic actors in authentic villages and wearing period-exact costumes, and you have a series that stands at the top of the list! The savage violence which produces shocking blood and gore may be off-putting to some, but it is totally appropriate and relatively mild when compared to the historical facts. There is mystery, love, greed, adventure, betrayal, and more. The power machinations of the Vikings and Englanders are the clear antecedent of modern politics: deceit, trickery, force, bluff, and betrayal are tools of the political trade. The villains have streaks of goodness; the heroes have streaks of villainy. But, they are all believable and indelible forces who are too magnificent to ignore. You can watch it for the beauty. You can watch it for the shock. You can watch it for the brilliant acting and writing. Or, you can watch it for the raw and overpowering entertainment. It's a visual and emotional feast that should not be missed!" —Camera guy

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    15. Goliath — a Prime Original series about washed-up (but brilliant) lawyer Billy McBride going up against the massive law firm he helped to create. He's getting his life back on track... while uncovering a deadly conspiracy.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 2 (ongoing)

    Promising review: "Billy Bob Thornton, aka He Who Can Do No Wrong (at least in my book) brings his charismatic presence to a role as a take-no-prisoners defense lawyer whose unfortunate past has considerably reduced his lifestyle. He's given an opportunity for redemption — and improved finances — when he takes on the huge company who's a client of his old law firm. Also at the firm, and now heading it up, is his old partner and nemesis, played with fine creep-itude by William Hurt. Not surprisingly, it boils down to an epic showdown between the two. The supporting cast is excellent; it's wonderful to see Dwight Yoakum onscreen again, along with Maria Bello." —Emmi331

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    16. Sex and the City — the HBO-classic about a group of four 30-something friends navigating relationships in New York City. Cosmopolitans and Manolo Blahniks make recurring appearances.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 6

    

Promising review:
 "I have always been a Sex and the City fan. I originally watched it on HBO. I love New York, and there are so many scenes and references throughout that make me so happy to visit. You have to love the girls and their amazing clothes and shoes. Although some things have changed in the world, I enjoy going back a decade to enjoy this slice of single-girl friendship, their romances, and the amazing city they are set in." —Barbara Walsh

    Watch here ($1.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    17. The Man In the High Castle — a show exploring a dystopian world in which the Allied Powers lost WWII, and Japan and Germany rule the U.S.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 2 (ongoing)

    It's based on Philip K. Dick's award-winning novel of the same name.

    Promising review: "This is an intelligent and troubling adaptation of Dick's The Man in the High Castle. It is a loose treatment that builds upon the characters and situations of the novel, often in surprising ways. Rufus Sewell is very sharp as Obergruppenführer John Smith, but I find him to be very good in everything he does. Another fine performance is by Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa, who plays Nobusuke Tagomi, the Japanese Trade Minister of the Pacific States of America. The younger leads are not quite of this caliber but are nevertheless effective. The depiction of a fascist America is clever and profoundly disturbing. The series makes visible the horror of Nazi-occupied America, with our own death camps, collaborators, and fascist national holidays, in a way that the novel could not. This is an important work. I would caution sensitive viewers: there are disturbing moments in this series, not so much because of any lurid depiction of its materials, but because certain moments are very emotionally intense. I am a literature teacher, and I fully intend to use this series in my teaching." —jeff aziz

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    18. Downton Abbey — an award-winning historical period drama (set in Britain between 1912 and 1926) about the lives of the aristocratic Crawley family and their domestic servants.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 6

    Promising review:
 "I'm one of those people that refused to watch this show because EVERYONE was talking about it. It took me until season five was airing originally before I started to watch. Of course, like everyone else, I was hooked instantly. I loved it so much I decided to start from the very beginning again when I saw it on Amazon. Beautifully acted and lovingly produced, there is so much to enjoy about this series, it's hard to pick out the best parts. There is a wonderful balance between the storylines with the servants and the aristocrats. The characters are beautifully drawn and very relatable. The truth is at the end of the day, it's an extremely high-end 'soap opera'. I mean that in the best way possible. It's a pure joy to watch." —DorothyZ

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    19. Orphan Black — a sci-fi thriller about an orphan named Sarah who assumes the identity of a woman who looks exactly like her after witnessing the woman's suicide. Turns out, they're both clones and they're not the only the ones.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 5

    

Promising review:
 "The trailers intrigued me, the plot seemed unlike anything that had been done before, and within the first three minutes of the premiere episode, I was completely hooked. The show has not disappointed me once and the further into this world we go, the more interesting, frustrating, and completely fascinating it becomes. The lead actor, Tatiana Maslany, is a truly amazing, talented actress bringing life to each character she plays convincingly, and in the process, brings forth a truly separate persona for each character. Each of her characters is so different and played so well, there's just no convincing yourself that it's anyone but the character onscreen. Add to that astounding talent of Ms. Maslany's, the solid talent of all the other actors who play characters in the show, who help to create a world that feels real. This is a show so well done it's one in which the viewer's sense of disbelief is put aside easily and keeps us coming back week after week." —Stephen M. Witty

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    20. True Blood — an HBO series that takes place in a world where synthetic blood has allowed vampires to come out of the shadow. As vampires and humans struggle to co-exist peacefully, telepathic waitress Sookie falls in love with a 173-year-old vampire.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 7

    This popular show was based on the book series The Southern Vampire Mysteries by Charlaine Harris.

    

Promising review:
 "True Blood is incredibly weird and wonderful, ranging from comedy to horror to drama, and is about as addictive as you could ever want. I absolutely loved the series on HBO and am now savoring watching it for the second time on Amazon. From the great ensemble cast to the music, the sets, just everything, it is so utterly delicious! And I have never been interested in the vampire genre at all. It's just so cleverly written and produced — highly recommended!" —M. SOMERVILLE

    Watch here ($3.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    21. The Tick — an adaptation of the comic book of the same name. It's not your average superhero show — it's a clever parody that you'll 100% enjoy watching.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 1 (ongoing)

    This isn't the first adaptation of The Tick — there was an earlier live-action series as well as an animated series.

    

Promising review:
 "In a world where superheroes are real, if not quite normal, Arthur Everest is an accountant. Not just any accountant, but one with a score to settle with 'The Terror,' a supervillain everyone else thinks is dead, PTSD and other mental health issues, and a friend he can't seem to get rid of: The Tick. He's an indestructible beacon of justice and superhero values, and he's determined to help Arthur rid the world of The Terror. He's just not that bright. Fortunately, Arthur's bright, he's just not a hero. Between them, they're the best superhero odd couple to ever answer the call. The Tick is superhero parody, but it's as smart as it is funny...and it's very funny." —Ernest Lilley

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    22. Mr. Robot — a psychological thriller following Elliot Alderson, a cyber-security engineer by day and hacker by night. He gets recruited by an anarchist to help destroy the largest corporation in the world — which happens to be the same firm that he's paid to protect.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 3 (ongoing)

    Promising review:
 "This show is completely engrossing. After watching the first two episodes I was hooked. Rami Malek is really outstanding as Elliot Alderson, and he will be the reason that you return again and again. Other exceptional stand-outs are Elliot Villar as Vera, Martin Wallström as Tyrell Wellick, and of course, Christian Slater as Mr. Robot. I would say that the story unfolds very thoughtfully, and it leaves enough bumps along the way to always pique your interest. Honestly though, besides the wonderful characters and story, the cinematography is the biggest pull for me. The camera work is beautiful and artistic. For instance, you'll often times have Elliot's head in the corner of a frame rather than just straight on, as if to tempt the viewer to look around in the scenery, almost as a simple play off of Elliot's paranoia. Scalpel precision is used to capture delicate facial expressions, subtle eye movements, and collect every ounce of energy that the cast gives off. I feel that I'm running myself ragged here, but I literally could go on and on about how many things I like about this show. Mr. Robot is a true 5-star show to me. Great cinematography, a stellar cast, and I can't get enough of it — an instant classic." —DigitalKitsune

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    23. Justified — a western centering around Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens, who's basically an Old West cowboy living in modern times. He enforces his own brand of justice to criminals who cross his path.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 6

    Promising review:
 "Raylan Givens, a kid from the hollers of Kentucky, has been a U.S. Marshal for a number of years. He's quick with a gun, but his shootings are always justified (aha!). After a typically questionable fatal shooting in Miami, Marshal Raylan is transferred back to the Lexington, KY, office of the Marshals Service. Back to the home he abhors, back to all the old buddies he grew up with, back to the criminal father he left behind. Fictitious Harlan County seems to be ground zero for the marijuana, meth, and Oxycontin trade, populated by murderous rednecks and trigger-happy women, and Raylan begins to feel right at home. It's a blast, folks. First class casting — Timothy Olyphant is an ideal Raylan Givens, the folks surrounding him are just as believable — and strong storylines make this series an enjoyable romp. Always funny, always just a tad over the top, Justified is my favorite escapist entertainment." —J. P. Kraus

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    24. 24 — a show in which counterterrorist agent Jack Bauer must solve a crisis in 24 hours. Each 24-episode season revolves around one crisis and each hour is a separate episode.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 8

    Promising review:
 "Be careful — this will suck you in, and you won't be able to stop watching! I had always heard how good this show was, but I just never got around to watching it when it was popular. Now I'm glad I didn't because I don't have to wait a whole week in between episodes to find out what happens next — how excruciating that must have been with all the cliff-hangers in this show! The story is so fast-paced and riveting that you can't stop watching. It's like a good book that you can't put down — you have to find out what happens next." —ColoArtist

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    25. House — a popular medical drama centering around Dr. Gregory House, a grumpy medical genius whose unconventional thinking and natural instincts help him diagnose difficult cases but puts him at odds with his colleagues and boss.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 8

    

Promising review:
 "House is a medical drama focused on a bitter yet brilliant physician whose specialty is diagnosing difficult-to-diagnose cases. He has been the victim of misdiagnosis himself and suffers from chronic pain which leads to his very public Vicodin popping. There is one problem with him being a physician, and that is he doesn't like patients and has zero bedside manner. The series itself is well-written, dramatic, and comedic — even heart-wrenching at times. I didn't know much about Hugh Laurie before, although I have seen him in other things, but his character is absolutely the most entertaining I have seen in some time." —ShoppingGrlOH

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    26. Teen Wolf — a series revolving around teenager Scott McCall, who gets bitten by a werewolf and transforms overnight from awkward sophomore to lacrosse team star. Unfortunately, his newfound abilities also mean werewolf hunters are after him.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 6

    It's loosely based on the 1985 film of the same.

    Promising review: "The title itself Teen Wolf kept me away for a while as I expected it to be like the Twilight variety. I was pleasantly surprised, and before I knew it, I was binge-watching all the seasons. The plot is tight, the casting is awesome, and I love the pace of the show. The special effects are great as well, no cheap CGI here. Tyler Posey does a great job playing the lead character, and his sidekick Dylan O'Brien is adorable and funny. I also love the lacrosse team coach, who is caught unaware amongst all the fighting between these supernatural creatures; great for some light-hearted comedy, especially after the show takes on a more serious/dark turn after season two. Try it if you've been considering it as well, you just might love it, too." —V Seldon

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    27. Six Feet Under — a show about a family in the funeral business. It's your typical dysfunctional family drama — plus lots and lots of focus on death, physically and philosophically. Dark souls rejoice.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 5

    A show about death can be surprisingly life-changing.

    

Promising review:
 "I'll be brief: This is the best show I've ever seen on TV. It is what began the new era of quality television, and it still shines as brightly. It is simply transcendent. I have recommended it as THERAPY to several friends, and it has worked — as it has for me. Give yourself the heart space for it, the brain space. Do this for your soul. It is a meditation on life in the most unexpected and profound ways." —Mila Baro

    Watch here ($1.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    28. The Americans — a period drama set during the Cold War, follows Elizabeth and Philip Jennings, two Soviet KGB officers posing as an American married couple living in the suburbs of Washington, D.C.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 6

    To make things even more interesting, the Jennings' neighbor is an FBI Counterintelligence agent who has no idea who they really are.

    Promising review:
 "This is different from anything else to begin with. Its storyline if not executed just so, could have gone off the rails. But this story is compelling, tragic, and frightening to digest. It grabs you and takes you to a place most TV just doesn't go. The fact that it is based in truth is revealing and disturbing. But the makers of this series have made it palatable and entertaining. It is hard-hitting. But our anti-heroes are likable people trapped in an alternative reality. The concept is amazing. Very well done!" —Thomas G. Kohls

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    29. The Newsroom — a series created by Aaron Sorkin, it chronicles the daily work of news anchor Will McAvoy and his talented team of producers and reporters who just want to put on a good and informative news program. But that's easier said than done.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 3

    

Promising review:
 "Much has already been said about the show's quality as a TV drama, the great acting, and inspired writing. I want to focus on something else. Having spent more than two decades at CNN Center in Atlanta, until two years ago, as a writer and producer, the show is a brilliant success in conveying what it feels like to be in a newsroom like that, especially when there is breaking news. The sets are absolutely true to life, not just the newsroom but also the studio and control room. I told my son as we were watching one episode that it looked like it had been filmed in the CNN International control room. I think they have done a wonderful job of distilling the life and feel of a newsroom." —Jose G. Perez

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    30. Rome — an epic historical drama portraying the formation of the Roman Empire. It traces the lives of the rich and the powerful, such as Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, but also gives focus to the fates of two common men.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 2

    Promising review: "We have all heard the story of the rise of Julius Caesar and his assassination on the Ides of March. This is HBO's telling of the familiar story, but with its own special twist. With a very authentic look and feel of first-century BC Italy, we are treated to an astonishing display of history (both real and often fictionalized), and a wonderful array of seemingly amoral characters. But it is about more than battles, politics, and palace intrigues. There is also another side which highlights middle-class Rome in the persons of two soldiers, Lucius Vorenius and Titus Pullo. These two scene-stealers follow the events through personal fortune and misfortune and become our eyes and ears as we witness the events unfold. Pullo is a killing machine with a heart of gold, if that can be imagined. Vorenius, his best buddy, is a likable stick-in-the-mud, dull as nails but absolutely loyal. It is hard to say who is who's sidekick. The action is gripping, the comedy (and there is plenty of it) is dark, brutal, and bizarre, like Rome itself. A wonderful adventure for the not-so-faint of heart." —Daisy Brambletoes

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    31. Hannibal — a horror thriller series about Dr. Hannibal Lector (pre-Silence of the Lambs) when he was still a forensic psychiatrist employed by the FBI and working with special investigator Will Graham. Of course, we all know how this story ends.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 3

    

Promising review:
 "This show is truly enjoyable. It is intelligent, well-written, and interesting. Psychiatrist Dr. Hannibal Lecter is asked to evaluate burned-out FBI agent Will Graham. Hannibal slowly but surely inserts himself into Will's life and career. The audience knows so much more than Will and the other FBI agents. There is the suspense. The production values are incredible. Hannibal's apartment is elegant, his wardrobe is the expression of sophistication and sartorial splendor. You could watch the show just for the decor. Then there is the visual presentation of Dr. Lecter's meals and dinner parties. Cannibal cuisine never looked so delicious. Hannibal is a connoisseur savoring the gourmet menus that result from his murderous forays. The cast is wonderful and totally believable. Mads Mikkelson is incredible. He is subtle and sensuous and slyly menacing. Hugh Dancy is equally interesting as the conflicted Agent Will Graham. Not to mention the talented Lawrence Fishburne and Gillian Anderson. It's a joy to watch them." —Zou Zou

    Watch here (only available for Prime members).

    32. Mozart in the Jungle — a show that gives us a glimpse behind the curtains at the New York Symphony. It's a blend of love, ambition, and classical music — a highly addictive combo.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 4

    It's based on oboist Blair Tindall's 2005 memoir Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music. At the beginning of the series, we are introduced to Hailey, a fresh-faced and ambitious oboist hoping to get her big break, and Rodrigo, a new maestro who is determined to shake things up.

    Promising review:
 "On stage, backstage, and sometimes in an abandoned lot, offering a side of pizza to its passerby-audience, this cast of talented actors and musicians holds onto its viewers. Gael Garcia Bernal gives a standout performance as Rodrigo, the new wildly-creative, unconventional conductor. The music is wonderful and it's not just classical, though it provides a worthy offering for the seasoned symphony-goer and a great introduction to the uninitiated; but included also is the magical husky voice of Billie Holiday singing 'You Go To My Head,' as well as the great percussive salsa sound of Jerry Medina. The subplots put characters in all sorts of interesting romantic liaisons. A noteworthy aspect of the symphony's story is the many inventive ways requisite funds are raised to keep the financially precarious institution afloat. The series works. All elements of filmmaking are in sync and successful — among them, great direction, camerawork, editing, stage sets, and on and on. Whenever you're available, a fun distraction to watch in binge form. Recommend." —New Orleans gal

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription; watch first episode for free).

    33. Doctor Who — a reboot of a cult favorite sci-fi show. It centers around a Time Lord called "the Doctor," an extraterrestrial being who time travels to save the world.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 11 (ongoing)

    The Doctor's preferred method of transportation? A spaceship called the TARDIS, conveniently disguised as a blue British police box.

    Promising review:
 "All of time and space, where do you want to start? Who wouldn't love the opportunity to travel through space and time, or wish to be brave and clever enough to save the world again and again? Doctor Who is an adult fantasy with non-stop action and adventure, but also holds a mirror up to our humanity, revealing our flaws, but giving us hope that we can be better. I can't tell you how many times I've watched each episode of Doctor Who, the old and the reboots, and I enjoy them just as much each time as I did the first. The plots, writing, and acting are great; I love Rose as the Doctor's companion and sympathize with the Doctor, the last of his kind trying to do the right thing in a dangerous universe." —Linda

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    34. Chuck — an action-comedy about a computer-whiz-next-door who accidentally becomes a spy after receiving an encoded e-mail from the CIA. Suddenly, his mundane life (working at electronics chain store Buy More) is turned upside down.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 5

    Promising review:
 "I won't spoil anything, but this is a great show. If you are in the mood for a funny, nerdy spy movie, then look no further! When I first found Chuck, I binge-watched it until I was caught up. Zachary Levi, Yvonne Strahovski, and everyone else that is on the cast do a great job in the entire series. I especially like the soundtrack for each of the seasons. Overall, a great show and super easy to get addicted to!" —Keith Dworak

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    35. Veep — a comedy that takes place in a world in which Julia Louis-Dreyfus (or rather, her character Selina Meyer) is Vice President. Politics is a tough game, but Meyer and her team try their best to create a legacy despite the hurdles.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 6 (ongoing)

    

Promising review:
 "This show is hilarious! It is tremendously smarter than most shows try to be. Although it is set in the world of politics, you do not feel as though someone is trying to force their political opinions on you; instead, you get transported to a wickedly funny place where the entire world of politics is brought down to earth for your personal amusement. Veep is very unique, but if you are a fan of quick intelligent humor such as 30 Rock and the fascinating political strategy of The West Wing, then you will feel at home in the hands of the show's creator, Armando Lannuci. The cast is STRONG. This show deserves the awards and nominations it gets each year." —Emma_Coates

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    36. Under The Dome — a sci-fi mystery drama in which a transparent and impenetrable dome inexplicably covers the small town of Chester's Mill, cutting off the residents from the rest of world.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 3

    As resources deplete and tensions rise, the main characters must find out the origin of the dome and when (and if) it will go away. It's based on a Stephen King novel of the same name.

    Promising review:
 "This is a great series that keeps me waiting for the next catastrophe. You never know what twists and turns are around the corner, the characters are believable, and situations seem real and plausible." —Deborah Ackley

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    37. Eureka — a quirky sci-fi show about a small town that is home to all the scientific geniuses in the country. Sometimes, bizarre creations emerge that threaten the safety of the entire world, and it's up to Sheriff Carter (a non-genius with common sense) to save the day.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 5

    

Promising review:
 "Eureka is a delightful change of pace from the run-of-the-mill Sci-Fi channel offerings. Not too serious, but with the sci-fi in place, it's always interesting to see what exotic and unusual experiments have gone awry, and what the consequences are for the town. What's not to like — a town where science is king, and the scientists get to play with as many of their toys as they want, government funded to boot! The cast have grown into their respective characters very well, and each brings something to the show." —Zhann

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    38. The Night Manager — a show featuring Tom Hiddleston as ex-British soldier Jonathan Pine, who gets recruited by MI6 to infiltrate the inner circle of Richard Roper, a businessman and arms dealer.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 1

    It's based on John le Carre's novel of the same name.

    Promising review:
 "This is series television at its pinnacle of perfection. The tension is relentless. The story is so totally credible in this day and age, it's frightening beyond imagination. The characters are fantastically well-drawn, and the acting utterly sublime. The taut guitar string of a plot is stretched to near breaking point as the antagonist and amoral arms dealer, played by Hugh Laurie, keeps turning the tuning knob ever tighter. Tom Hiddleston's night manager is exquisitely flawed and yet turns out to have a talent for the spy game. He walks on the proverbial knife's edge in every episode. But my favorite supporting characters are the British spy handler, Angela Burr (played by Oliva Coleman) and Laurie's best pal and security SOB 'Corky' played by Tom Hollander. They both deserve Emmy Awards. I binge-watched the first six episodes, and it was the best investment of time watching television I've ever made." —Gary Olsen

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    39. One Missippi — a semi-autobiographical dark comedy created by and starring comedian Tig Notaro. In the show, Tig is a radio show host diagnosed with breast cancer who returns home to Mississippi after her mother's sudden death.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 2

    

Promising review:
 "This exceeded my expectations! I absolutely devoured this show and I wish there was more. I expected hilarity but I got surprising sincerity and honest life lessons. That is not to say I didn't laugh. Everything Tig says is wonderfully succinct and hilarious. I'll watch season one over and over until I get the second season I need." —Brady Thompson

    Watch here (only available for Prime members; watch first episode for free).

    40. Grantchester — a detective drama set in a quaint English village in the 1950s. Sidney Chambers is a charming vicar who teams up with no-nonsense police inspector Geordie Keating to solve murders.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 3 (ongoing)

    The series is based on The Grantchester Mysteries, collections of short stories written by James Runcie. Oh, and there's an adorable black lab named Dickens who makes recurring appearances.

    

Promising review:
 "Compassionate, well-written, wonderfully acted, and deeper than you expect. I love that the show deals with things like PTSD, homosexual rights, and strong women against a historical backdrop, and that Sidney Chambers is so complex. He's wonderfully empathetic and genuinely caring but tormented by his own demons and as human as anyone. He and Geordie are the best couple since Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin — and of course, it doesn't hurt that James Norton is drop-dead gorgeous. What I love most is that the show is sweet and kind without being cloying. It has a core of darkness, but it's darkness with hope and determination." —Jane Ryder

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    41. Humans — a series exploring an alternate reality in which 'synths' (human-like robotic servants) are common in households. Gradually, the robots gain sentience, but the rest of the world is not ready to accept them.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 3 (ongoing)

    Promising review:
 "Best sci-fi I have seen this year. It is very intense, and the acting is so good. If you like science fiction, give this show a try. Every single episode has had me sitting at the edge of my seat waiting to see what will happen next! It really makes me think about a world where there are synthetic 'helpers', but there are a few special ones that can think and feel." —movieaddict

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    42. Psych — a detective dramedy (more comedy than drama) in which Shawn Spencer, a smart and eccentric sleuth with an eidetic memory, helps the Santa Barbara Police Department solve crimes under the guise of being a psychic.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 8

    Shawn gets plenty of help from his BFF Burton Guster, a responsible and knowledgeable pharmaceutical salesman, and his dad, a retired police detective with whom Shawn has a strained relationship with.

    

Promising review: "The writing on this series is sooo clever. I especially enjoy the '80s references, and the pineapple searches (one hidden in every episode). And the banter between the characters. The show was cast perfectly. When Netflix stop carrying it, I had to purchase the series here on Amazon." —Nelibelle

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    43. Treme — a drama set in post-Katrina New Orleans. It follows the lives of local residents as they grapple with the aftermath of the natural disaster and rebuild their lives.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 4

    It's created by Eric Overmeyer and David Simon, who were also behind The Wire.

    

Promising review:
 "Treme has everything: engrossing storylines, fabulous music, and great acting. Set in the Treme neighborhood of post-Katrina New Orleans, the stories of the people who live there vividly illustrate the effects of a catastrophic storm. The main characters include a female chef, a college professor and his attorney wife, several musicians, a would-be musician, a woman who owns a bar, and an up-and-coming trumpet player whose father is a 'Mardi Gras Indian.' It's all about the struggle to maintain the culture of an old but vibrant city." —Amazon Customer

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    44. The Expanse — a series set 200 years in the future, when humanity has colonized the Solar System. Earth, Mars, and the asteroid belt (each with unique inhabitants) are at the brink of war. Meanwhile, a girl is missing in space and the search for her uncovers a horrible secret.

    amazon.com

    Seasons: 3 (ongoing)

    

Promising review:
 "Blown away! I'm a huge sci-fi buff, and this might not only be the best sci-fi TV series but my favorite series period! If you are a fan of science fiction, you owe it to yourself to put this at the very top of your watch list. Even if you're not big on sci-fi, make sure it's on your list. I'm even more pulled in than I am with Game of Thrones! Epic, engaging story, very talented cast, blockbuster movie-quality effects. Incredible! Love all the low/zero-gravity effects and trying to make them scientifically accurate. Of course, that's just the tip of the iceberg with this show! Be forewarned: We binged the entire thing in one day, which we NEVER do. We couldn't peel ourselves away! Completely mesmerized." —Andrew Young

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    45. Bones — a long-running series following forensic anthropologist Dr. Temperance "Bones" Brennan (an extremely intelligent but socially inept scientist) and special agent Seeley Booth as they team up to solve FBI cases by examining human remains.

    amazon.com

    Seasons:

 12

    Promising review:
 "Love this show. It has kept its integrity and remained faithful to the personality of the characters. They keep adding plot twists that keep you entertained. I love trying to figure out "whodunnit" before the reveal at the end of the episodes. This is one of the only shows that I am willing to purchase every season." —ericka428

    Watch here ($2.99/episode if you don't have a Prime subscription).

    Buckle down, it's time for a major binge-watch sesh.

    Nickelodeon Animation Studios

    Did I mention that SpongeBob Squarepants is also on Amazon Prime? You're welcome!!!

    Reviews here have been edited for length and/or clarity.

    Sign up for Amazon Prime here.

    Looking for the perfect gift for any occasion? Check out all of BuzzFeed’s gift guides!

    Allison Krausman / BuzzFeed

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