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This Is What It's Like To Be A Syrian Refugee Child In Lebanon.

I asked 12 young aspiring journalists who have fled the war in Syria three different questions about what their life is like now. They were given pen, paper and a camera. These are their answers: in their own words, as seen through their own eyes. Warning: May restore faith in humanity.

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What makes you feel safe?

"I feel safe here in Lebanon where we can sleep and play, and life is normal. Here we are far from the sounds of war and death, far from the screams of our tortured childhoods. Syria is just behind that mountain, full of despair and torment. I hope peace lasts here." Jamal Hassani, 13
UNICEF Lebanon

"I feel safe here in Lebanon where we can sleep and play, and life is normal. Here we are far from the sounds of war and death, far from the screams of our tortured childhoods. Syria is just behind that mountain, full of despair and torment. I hope peace lasts here." Jamal Hassani, 13

"I feel safe here, where there is peace and safety. In Lebanon and in the camp we feel safe because in the sky there are no missiles and no bullets, just birds and doves of peace. I ask myself: have they come with news of peace from precious Syria?" Nour al-Huda Matar, 15
UNICEF Lebanon

"I feel safe here, where there is peace and safety. In Lebanon and in the camp we feel safe because in the sky there are no missiles and no bullets, just birds and doves of peace. I ask myself: have they come with news of peace from precious Syria?" Nour al-Huda Matar, 15

"I feel safe when I'm with my family because they give me tenderness and hope. And I feel safe when I'm in school because it gives me and all the children in the camp a bright future." Jamal Ibrahim, 13
UNICEF Lebanon

"I feel safe when I'm with my family because they give me tenderness and hope. And I feel safe when I'm in school because it gives me and all the children in the camp a bright future." Jamal Ibrahim, 13

"I feel safe in the camp because this is where Syrians gather. Love, hope and peace dwell in their hearts and when I'm with them I feel like I'm home, as if I'm back in Syria." Hussein al-Ibrahim, 13
UNICEF Lebanon

"I feel safe in the camp because this is where Syrians gather. Love, hope and peace dwell in their hearts and when I'm with them I feel like I'm home, as if I'm back in Syria." Hussein al-Ibrahim, 13

What do you hate most about camp life?

"I hate that these are now our homes, places made of wooden panels and some pieces of fabric and nylon. Our furniture is made of the love that fills our tents, which hugs our bodies and protects us from the heat and the cold." Taghreed Izzidine, 14
UNICEF Lebanon

"I hate that these are now our homes, places made of wooden panels and some pieces of fabric and nylon. Our furniture is made of the love that fills our tents, which hugs our bodies and protects us from the heat and the cold." Taghreed Izzidine, 14

"There are two problems here: the garbage and sewage. They are everywhere and they cause diseases, and not just in humans. With awareness and collaboration, we will solve these two problems." Zohour Haidar, 13.
UNICEF Lebanon

"There are two problems here: the garbage and sewage. They are everywhere and they cause diseases, and not just in humans. With awareness and collaboration, we will solve these two problems." Zohour Haidar, 13.

"I hate that the roads are full of rubble. Any pedestrian passing by could stumble and hurt themselves. And I hate that there is mud spread all over the place. Mud colours everything here: the streets, the tents, even children’s bare feet." Ali Harba, 10
UNICEF Lebanon

"I hate that the roads are full of rubble. Any pedestrian passing by could stumble and hurt themselves. And I hate that there is mud spread all over the place. Mud colours everything here: the streets, the tents, even children’s bare feet." Ali Harba, 10

"I hate that because of our circumstances, there is always the possibility that we will be chucked out of our tent, or even out of the whole camp. Being expelled to another place would be a big problem, especially in the winter." Abdel Wakeel Al-Ibrahim, 11
UNICEF Lebanon

"I hate that because of our circumstances, there is always the possibility that we will be chucked out of our tent, or even out of the whole camp. Being expelled to another place would be a big problem, especially in the winter." Abdel Wakeel Al-Ibrahim, 11

What do you think people don't know about life in the camp?

"They do not know that I am not a refugee, I am a talented Syrian girl. My talent is my way from darkness to light, my way to a new future. I am an essential part of the future and its colours… wait for me." Shaymaa Alloush, 12
UNICEF Lebanon

"They do not know that I am not a refugee, I am a talented Syrian girl. My talent is my way from darkness to light, my way to a new future. I am an essential part of the future and its colours… wait for me." Shaymaa Alloush, 12

"Every day there is a queue. Registration, distribution - these words create queues, inhumane queues, and bitter waiting. The people in the queues are just machines, moving only by the order of the distributor. When will it end? You tell me. I am sick of queuing." Salam Al-Nasser, 14
UNICEF Lebanon

"Every day there is a queue. Registration, distribution - these words create queues, inhumane queues, and bitter waiting. The people in the queues are just machines, moving only by the order of the distributor. When will it end? You tell me. I am sick of queuing." Salam Al-Nasser, 14

"They do not know about Bilal. Bilal is a 10 year old Syrian child. He lives in the camp and painting is his hobby. His dream in the future is to become a famous painter. He always paints: in school, at home, with his friends, everywhere. He hopes to go back to his country to draw a new future for Syria. But will the world see his talent? Or will it stay in the shadow?" Nada Noaiem, 14
UNICEF Lebanon

"They do not know about Bilal. Bilal is a 10 year old Syrian child. He lives in the camp and painting is his hobby. His dream in the future is to become a famous painter. He always paints: in school, at home, with his friends, everywhere. He hopes to go back to his country to draw a new future for Syria. But will the world see his talent? Or will it stay in the shadow?" Nada Noaiem, 14

"People don't know that every morning, families come together to drink tea and enjoy themselves. They talk over the camp’s sorrows and joys. If they have a problem, they solve it while they are drinking tea. For us, tea is the drink of love and communication." Waad Al-Zohouri, 14
UNICEF Lebanon

"People don't know that every morning, families come together to drink tea and enjoy themselves. They talk over the camp’s sorrows and joys. If they have a problem, they solve it while they are drinking tea. For us, tea is the drink of love and communication." Waad Al-Zohouri, 14

Waad and his 11 classmates are all part of a Youth Press Club run by local NGO Beyond Association that is funded by UNICEF Lebanon. The Press Club gives young Syrian refugees from informal tented settlements in the Zahle area of Lebanon a chance to talk about the daily issues they face while learning valuable photography and writing skills. To find out how else UNICEF Lebanon is helping children in Lebanon, click here.

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