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How Normal Are Your Grammar Gripes?

Are you more grammar police or vocab maverick?

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Are your language-related pet peeves universal, or is it just you? Take the poll and find out!

Stallio / Creative Commons / Via Flickr: stallio
  1. Let's get started: What are your feelings on the word whom?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Simple — it's the objective case of who and it should be used as such.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Can we ban whom? It sounds as old-fashioned as thou and ye.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I might not always use it correctly, but it's all right, I guess.
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Let's get started: What are your feelings on the word whom?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Simple — it's the objective case of who and it should be used as such.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Can we ban whom? It sounds as old-fashioned as thou and ye.
  3.  
    vote votes
    I might not always use it correctly, but it's all right, I guess.
  1. How about the word irregardless?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Word? No. This is not a word.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Sure — it's in the dictionary, after all.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I wouldn't use it myself, but it doesn't bug me too much.
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How about the word irregardless?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Word? No. This is not a word.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Sure — it's in the dictionary, after all.
  3.  
    vote votes
    I wouldn't use it myself, but it doesn't bug me too much.
  1. When you're shortening until, do you spell it till or ’til?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Definitely till — that apostrophe is too old-fashioned.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Definitely ’til — it's an abbreviation for until, which has one L.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I just keep it simple and say til.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Um...can we just end this debate and stick with until?
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When you're shortening until, do you spell it till or ’til?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Definitely till — that apostrophe is too old-fashioned.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Definitely ’til — it's an abbreviation for until, which has one L.
  3.  
    vote votes
    I just keep it simple and say til.
  4.  
    vote votes
    Um...can we just end this debate and stick with until?
  1. And is it Internet or internet?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Capitalized for sure — it's a proper name for a specific network.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Lowercase — it's been around long enough to be treated as a common noun.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Doesn't really matter to me — people will know what you mean either way.
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And is it Internet or internet?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Capitalized for sure — it's a proper name for a specific network.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Lowercase — it's been around long enough to be treated as a common noun.
  3.  
    vote votes
    Doesn't really matter to me — people will know what you mean either way.
Chris Griego / Creative Commons / Via Flickr: cgriego
  1. If someone said "I need to lay low for a while," how would you feel?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Bad — it should be "lie low."
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Good — "lay low" is normal and everyone says it that way.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I've got more important grammar gripes tbh.
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If someone said "I need to lay low for a while," how would you feel?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Bad — it should be "lie low."
  2.  
    vote votes
    Good — "lay low" is normal and everyone says it that way.
  3.  
    vote votes
    I've got more important grammar gripes tbh.
  1. What about when people say "literally" but they actually mean "figuratively"?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Nooooo, the dictionary exists for a reason!
    Correct
    Incorrect
    No problem! It's literally everywhere — get used to it.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    It may be a little overused, but it's not a disaster or anything.
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What about when people say "literally" but they actually mean "figuratively"?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Nooooo, the dictionary exists for a reason!
  2.  
    vote votes
    No problem! It's literally everywhere — get used to it.
  3.  
    vote votes
    It may be a little overused, but it's not a disaster or anything.
  1. Do each other and one another mean different things?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Definitely — each other is for two people, and one another is for more than two.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    What are you talking about? They are totally interchangeable.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I know they're different, but I'm not real concerned about it.
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Do each other and one another mean different things?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Definitely — each other is for two people, and one another is for more than two.
  2.  
    vote votes
    What are you talking about? They are totally interchangeable.
  3.  
    vote votes
    I know they're different, but I'm not real concerned about it.
  1. Is it coworker or co-worker?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Coworker — the hyphen is an unnecessary distraction.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Co-worker, because there are no cows involved (probably).
    Correct
    Incorrect
    It's all the same to me!
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Is it coworker or co-worker?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Coworker — the hyphen is an unnecessary distraction.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Co-worker, because there are no cows involved (probably).
  3.  
    vote votes
    It's all the same to me!
  1. Let's talk possessives for a moment: How do you make a proper name ending with S possessive?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Use only an apostrophe in all cases — e.g., "Katniss' bow."
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Use apostrophe + S in all cases — e.g., "Katniss's bow."
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Whatever looks best, I guess?
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I actually have a more complicated rule for this, which I will share in the comments.
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Let's talk possessives for a moment: How do you make a proper name ending with S possessive?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Use only an apostrophe in all cases — e.g., "Katniss' bow."
  2.  
    vote votes
    Use apostrophe + S in all cases — e.g., "Katniss's bow."
  3.  
    vote votes
    Whatever looks best, I guess?
  4.  
    vote votes
    I actually have a more complicated rule for this, which I will share in the comments.
Richard Leeming / Creative Commons / Via Flickr: dickdotcom
  1. Please describe your feelings about this sentence: "I wish I was a little bit taller."

    Correct
    Incorrect
    It's wrong — it should be "I wish I were a little bit taller." #SaveTheSubjunctiveMood
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Makes perfect sense to me — no real need for the subjunctive mood here, imho.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    My biggest concern is that this song is stuck in my head now.
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Please describe your feelings about this sentence: "I wish I was a little bit taller."
  1.  
    vote votes
    It's wrong — it should be "I wish I were a little bit taller." #SaveTheSubjunctiveMood
  2.  
    vote votes
    Makes perfect sense to me — no real need for the subjunctive mood here, imho.
  3.  
    vote votes
    My biggest concern is that this song is stuck in my head now.
  1. And how do you feel about the singular they (e.g., "Someone parked their car in my spot")?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Ugh, it's just incorrect. Why not just say "he or she" or reword the sentence?
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Love it! It's concise, it's inclusive, and it's been around for centuries.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    No strong feelings on this one.
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And how do you feel about the singular they (e.g., "Someone parked their car in my spot")?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Ugh, it's just incorrect. Why not just say "he or she" or reword the sentence?
  2.  
    vote votes
    Love it! It's concise, it's inclusive, and it's been around for centuries.
  3.  
    vote votes
    No strong feelings on this one.
  1. Do you spell it doughnut or donut?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Clearly it's doughnut. It's made of dough, not do.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Definitely donut. Short and sweet!
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Honestly, not real picky as long as I get to eat one.
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Do you spell it doughnut or donut?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Clearly it's doughnut. It's made of dough, not do.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Definitely donut. Short and sweet!
  3.  
    vote votes
    Honestly, not real picky as long as I get to eat one.
  1. Here's a controversial one: How do you pronounce GIF?

    Correct
    Incorrect
    Hard G — the G stands for graphics, not giraphics.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Soft G — that's how the inventor of the GIF pronounces it, so it must be right.
    Correct
    Incorrect
    I'm not real particular — you can even pronounce it G.I.F. if you want.
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Here's a controversial one: How do you pronounce GIF?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Hard G — the G stands for graphics, not giraphics.
  2.  
    vote votes
    Soft G — that's how the inventor of the GIF pronounces it, so it must be right.
  3.  
    vote votes
    I'm not real particular — you can even pronounce it G.I.F. if you want.
  1. And the question you've been waiting for: Do you use the Oxford comma (aka serial comma)?

    Sarah Willson / BuzzFeed / Cory Doctorow / Creative Commons / Flickr: doctorow
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Yes — it's much cleaner and avoids ambiguity that way!
    Correct
    Incorrect
    No — it's much cleaner and avoids ambiguity that way!
    Correct
    Incorrect
    As long as the sentence makes sense, I don't really have a preference.
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And the question you've been waiting for: Do you use the Oxford comma (aka serial comma)?
  1.  
    vote votes
    Yes — it's much cleaner and avoids ambiguity that way!
  2.  
    vote votes
    No — it's much cleaner and avoids ambiguity that way!
  3.  
    vote votes
    As long as the sentence makes sense, I don't really have a preference.

Finally, any thoughts on this sentence?

  1. Correct
    Incorrect
    AUGHHHH NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
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  1.  
    vote votes
    AUGHHHH NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

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