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This Victoria's Secret Model Just Whitesplained The Fashion Industry's Diversity Problem And People Are Dragging Her To Paris And Back

"Oh my god. Small violin."

ICYMI, Model Squad is a new E! docuseries that follows nine fashion models living, loving, and working in NYC.

Instagram: @modelsquad

The show features Daniela Braga, Olivia Culpo, Hannah Ferguson, Ping Hue, Nadine Leopold, Caroline Lowe, Ashley Moore, Shanina Shaik, and Devon Windsor. And here's a more detailed description from the show's About page: "Having graced the pages of Vogue and Sports Illustrated, landed campaigns for Balmain and Givenchy, and walked the coveted Victoria’s Secret fashion show, these ladies have taken the fashion world by storm. However, these women did not get to where they are today without hard work, dedication and perseverance...The new series offers an authentic look as they learn to live, love and conquer the Big Apple, and captures the emotional highs and lows of navigating their complicated world."

In a recent episode, runway model Shanina Shaik spoke openly about the fashion industry's huge lack of diversity, as well as the very real racism and colorism that models of color continue to face:

instagram.com

"I used to get bullied. Because of my skin color, I wasn't gonna be able to do high fashion," she said. "A lot of black girls would have to miss Milan [Fashion Week] because they weren't able to walk in the shows because they don't want girls of that color."

Ping Hue jumped in, telling her white cast mates that she knows "it's super hard [for them] to relate to" these experiences, to which Victoria Secret model Devon Windsor responded, "I literally fucking went through hell" working in a different country every month for two years. "[I] didn't speak that language, didn't speak Paris, didn't speak Italian," she added.

Oxygen / Via giphy.com

Yes, you read that correctly.

When Ping said she didn't think Devon could "relate to the turmoils of being different," the VS model quickly responded "Do you know how hard it is to be blonde? I have to get a highlight every month!"

Oxygen / Via giphy.com

Ping's response: "Oh my god. Small violin."

People were equally parts offended and bewildered by both Devon's calling Paris a language, and her hijacking a woman of color's conversation about racism and colorism and centering it on her highlights. "White women in a nutshell," @marquitasade wrote in a now-viral tweet.

FYI Devon took a page right out of The Toxic White Feminism Playbook, specifically from the section on "Centering": "White women get so caught up in how they feel in a moment of black women expressing themselves that they completely vacuum the energy, direction, and point of the conversation to themselves and their feelings," wrote Rachel Elizabeth Cargle. "They start to explain why race is hard for them to talk about, what they think would be a better solution to the topic at hand, and perhaps what women of color can do to make it more palatable."

Twitter user @emilytrevinno specified that anyone can change their hair color, but people of color can't change their skin color. "Don’t try to compare your 'struggles' when you haven’t step foot in their skin & experienced the hardships they face in their everyday life," she wrote.

@marquitasade @queenb024 this whole video disgusts me. you can CHANGE your hair color by choice but poc can NOT CHANGE THEIR SKIN COLOR. don’t try to compare your “struggles” when you haven’t step foot in their skin & experienced the hardships they face in their everyday life. smh a whole mess.

While @Deliauhhh addressed how even on the topic of hair discrimination, blondes STILL have it much better than black natural-haired professionals (and students!): "She has to get highlights every month, yet others are denied jobs because of their NATURAL hair texture."

@MizFitKiKi @marquitasade She has to get highlights every month, yet others are denied jobs because of their NATURAL hair texture. https://t.co/OaemI9xuZz

And let's not forget how the predominantly white fashion industry's history of disregarding black models' haircare and styling needs at fashion shows and other events.

Of course Devon's delusional argument inspired A LOT of jokes, like this one from fellow white woman A. M. Lalonde: "Do you not know how hard it is to learn to speak Paris?" she wrote "And highlights are no joke! The day I missed my hair appointment was the same day they 'ran out' of pumpkin spice at Starbucks! Coincidence? No. Reverse racism? YES!"

@marquitasade As a white woman this is HIGHLY offensive! Do you not know how hard it is to learn to speak Paris? And highlights are no joke! The day I missed my hair appointment was the same day they 'ran out' of pumpkin spice at Starbucks! Coincidence? No. Reverse racism? YES!

Devon has since responded to the backlash with a screenshot apology in which she admits that her comments were "incredibly insensitive," but also claims that "the majority of the conversation was edited."

The model later tweeted that she had blocked some users "because hateful comments, not aimed at educating me or anyone else, is not something I want to absorb," and thanked those who had taking time out of their days to "teach" her. "Honestly shows that you really care," she wrote.

And fellow white Model Squad star Olivia Culpo also took to Twitter to defend Devon: "Please understand information can be taken out of context & misconstrued to manufacture drama. I can assure you Dev has an immensely kind heart and anything that portrays otherwise is a manipulation of her true character."

I love you @devwindsor. Please understand information can be taken out of context & misconstrued to manufacture drama. I can assure you Dev has an immensely kind heart and anything that portrays otherwise is a manipulation of her true character ❤️❤️❤️

The other cast mates have yet to publicly comment on the clip.

For future references, when a person of color is sharing their experiences with racism, take it from the greatest supermodel of all time and just don't compare your life to theirs.

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