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    Lana Condor Said She Felt "Horrible Mentally" After The Success Of "To All The Boys I've Loved Before"

    "No one knew."

    We know you loved To All the Boys I've Loved Before.

    Lana Condor, in pigtails, and Israel Broussard, wearing a baseball cap, seating on bleacher seats in To All theBoys I've Loved Before
    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    The third and final film in Netflix's To All the Boys series, To All the Boys: Always and Forever, drops on Feb. 12 — and in an interview with Self, series star Lana Condor opened up about how the success of the first film affected her mental health.

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    Netflix / YouTube / Via youtube.com

    The first film in the series — To All the Boys I've Loved Before — came out in 2018, while the sequel — To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You — came out in 2020.

    “[The movie] was received way better than I had ever imagined in my wildest dreams," Condor explained. "It changed much of my life very quickly."

    Lana Condor, wearing a jacket and blouse, in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    The film's success also coincided with her set time on the SyFy TV series Deadly Class — and Condor said that she felt overloaded as a result.

    Lana Condor stands in between John Corbett and Anna Cathcart in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    “I was just saying yes to everything because it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Condor said, "and you want to capitalize on it, and you want to feel like you’re fully embracing everything."

    Noah Centineo and Lana Condor sit at a picnic table in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Masha Weisberg / Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    The result, Condor said, is that she "never felt more horrible mentally. I was so burned out."

    Anna Cathcart, Janel Parrish, and Lana Condor sit on a bed in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    "I would go home at night and I couldn’t speak. I couldn’t eat. I couldn’t sleep. I would shake going to bed and shake waking up because it was just so much stimulation.”

    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    Eventually, Condor approached her team to let them know how she was feeling: "I had this moment where I just was in tears, telling them that I don’t feel OK. And they were all shocked because I wasn’t open about my feelings. No one knew. When I had that conversation with them, it was like a new beginning. Now I know the power of sharing that.”

    Lana Condor and Noah Centineo sit in a car in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    “My mom and my dad are so supportive,” she continued. “We’ve had conversations about ‘Lana, you need to stop. You’re clearly unhappy.’ … [And I said,] ‘OK, let’s figure out the root of that.’ My parents have been a great sounding board.”

    Lana Condor sits at a park bench with a bag by her side, holding a pen above a spiral notebook, in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Masha Weisberg / Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    Condor's boyfriend, Anthony de la Torre, also provided emotional support: "He is so great at communicating, and he genuinely wants to know how I feel and what’s going on in my head, which [makes me] feel so loved and taken care of.”

    Noah Centineo looks into Lana Condor's eyes in To All the Boys I've Loved Before
    Netflix / courtesy Everett Collection

    Condor concluded that, since she decided to be open with those around her about her struggles, she's now in a place "where I feel like I can do what I love and also be the person that I want to be for myself.”

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