Pauline Hanson Explaining How She Didn't Flip-Flop On Tax Cuts Is Really Something Else

    [Ron Howard voice] She did.

    Please take literally 14 seconds out of your day to enjoy this video of Pauline Hanson explaining how she definitely, no way, absolutely did not flip-flop on tax cuts.

    Pauline Hanson explains why she hasn't flip-flopped on company tax cuts: "I said no originally, then I said yes. Then I have said no, and I've stuck to it." πŸ™ƒπŸ˜†πŸ™ƒ https://t.co/mskQX1tTNu

    Hanson told the Senate: "I haven't flip-flopped. I said no originally, then I said yes. Then I have said no, and I've stuck to it."

    As it turns out, this succinct account of events matches quite perfectly with the actual definition of flip-flopping.

    Merriam Webster / Via merriam-webster.com
    Macmillan Dictionary / Via macmillandictionary.com
    Cambridge Dictionary / Via dictionary.cambridge.org

    But more to the point – what, exactly, did Hanson definitely not flip-flop on?

    Last week the government had a big win when the parliament passed its $144 billion personal income tax reform package, a centrepiece of this year's budget.

    And this week it's still all about tax, but this time the amount paid by companies.

    The government is hoping it can secure the votes of the Senate crossbench to pass legislation that would cut the company tax rate for businesses with an annual revenue over $50 million.

    Labor and the Greens are opposed to the legislation, so the government needs eight crossbench votes to win it.

    Several senators, including Derryn Hinch, Centre Alliance's Rex Patrick and Stirling Griff, and independent Tim Storer, are all currently against the legislation.

    And as for Hanson and her fellow One Nation senator Peter Georgiou ... well, Hanson suggested on The Today Show this morning that her vote may actually be contingent on whether the government cracks down on multinational tax avoiders and supports a coal-fired power station in North Queensland.

    So let's just leave it with this.

    HANSON: If they want to accuse me or the Labor Party – I can imagine down in the chamber [they are saying] again she is flip-flopping – that is my prerogative and I will change my mind as many times as I want to to ensure that I come up with the right decision.

    KARL STEFANOVIC: Exactly. If Pauline Hanson wants to flip-flop, she can flip-flop.

    HANSON: I will.

    Lane Sainty is the editor of BuzzFeed News in Australia and is based in Sydney.

    Contact Lane Sainty at lane.sainty@buzzfeed.com.

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