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    22 Incredibly Old Living Things

    Rachel Sussman has been traveling the world for the past few years photographing some of the oldest living things on Earth. Here's a look at some of what she's found.

    22. Welwitschia; 2,000 years old

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    Namib Naukluft Desert, Namibia

    21. Sagole Baobab; 2,000 years old

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    Limpopo Province, South Africa

    20. Brain Coral; 2,000 years old

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    Speyside, Tobago

    19. Sentinel Tree; 2,150 years old

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    Sequoia National Park, CA

    18. Patagonian Cypress; 2,200 years old

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    Alerce Costero National Monument, Chile

    17. Armillaria Ostoyae; 2,400 years old

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    Malhuer National Forest, OR

    16. Fortingall Yew; 2-5,000 years old

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    Perthshire, Scotland

    15. Jomon Sugi Japanese Cedar; 2,000-7,000 years old

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    Yaku Shima, Japan

    14. Chestnut Tree; 3,000 years old

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    Sant A'lfio, Sicily

    13. Olive Tree; 3,000 years old

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    Ano Vouves, Crete

    12. La Llareta; 3,000 years old

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    Atacama Desert, Chile

    11. Bald Cyprus; 3,500 years old

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    Seminole County, FL

    10. Bristlecone Pine; 5,000 years old

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    White Mountains, CA

    9. Spruce Gran Picea; 9,500 years old

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    Fulufjället, Sweden

    8. Antarctic Beech; 12,000 years old

    7. Clonal Mojave Yucca; 12,000 years old

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    Mojave Desert, CA

    6. Clonal Creosote Bush; 12,000 years old

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    Mojave Desert, CA

    5. Underground Forest; 13,000 years old

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    Pretoria, South Africa

    4. Lomatia Tasmanica; 43,600 years old

    3. Clonal Quaking Aspens; 80,000 years old

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    Fish Lake, UT

    2. Posidonia Oceania Sea Grass; 100,000 years old

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    Balearic Islands, Spain

    1. Siberian Actinobacteria; 400,000-600,000 years old

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    Neils Bohr Institute, Copenhagen