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This Bearded Bride Will Challenge How You Think About Beauty

Harnaam Kaur's stunning flower beard shouldn't be missed.

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Kaur has Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, an endocrine system disorder that can cause major hormonal imbalances.

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For Kaur, it caused her to start sprouting facial hair when she was just 11.

"I used to have my face waxed two to three times a week," she told the blog Rock N Roll Bride, "and on the days I couldn’t bare the pain I would simply shave.”

Having so much facial hair at such a young age was rough.

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Despite growing up in a supportive home, she admits that she often resorted to self-harm. At 16, though, Kaur says she radically shifted the way she thought about herself.

“I told myself, ‘The energy you are putting into ending your life, put all that energy into turning your life around and doing something better.’”

The Slough, U.K.-based Kaur decided to embrace her beard. “I have now fallen in love with the elements on my body that people may call ‘flaws.’”

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“I love my beard, my stretch marks, and my scars,” she told Rock N Roll Bride. “These elements make me who I am, they make me whole, they make me complete.”

Coulthurst says she was inspired by Kaur's facial hair.

Louisa Coulthurst/UrbanBridesmaid.com / Via rocknrollbride.com

"I had always been intrigued by the thought of floral beards and a thought came to me of wouldn’t it be cool to have a floral beard on a woman," she said. "I emailed Harnaam and she was excited and wanted to get involved.”

"I wanted to show society that beauty isn’t just about looking a certain way. We are all so different, and we should all celebrate our individuality," said Kaur.

Louisa Coulthurst / UrbanBridesmaid.com / Via rocknrollbride.com

"I used to keep my beard for religious reasons, but now I keep my hair to show the world a different, confident, diverse, and strong image of a woman."

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