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Here's What Your Car Looked Like When It First Debuted

Or at least your dream car!

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1. Ford Mustang: 1964 vs. Today

In 1964, the Ford Motor company released the Mustang and with it a whole new category of automobile called the "pony car"–a class of affordable, compact, and highly stylized automobiles with a sporty look. Over fifty years later, Ford offers the Mustang Shelby GT350R.

In 1964, the Ford Motor company released the Mustang and with it a whole new category of automobile called the "pony car"–a class of affordable, compact, and highly stylized automobiles with a sporty look. Over fifty years later, Ford offers the Mustang Shelby GT350R.

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In 1964, the Ford Motor company released the Mustang and with it a whole new category of automobile called the "pony car"–a class of affordable, compact, and highly stylized automobiles with a sporty look. Over fifty years later, Ford offers the Mustang Shelby GT350R.

2. Jeep: 1941 vs. Today

The original Jeep went into production in 1941 and was used exclusively by the United States Military during World War II. It's hard to say where the name "Jeep" came from, although many believe that it's a slur on the military designation "GP", or "Government Purposes".

Another popular theory is that it was named after a character from the Popeye comic strip called "Eugene the Jeep". Eugene the Jeep was Popeye's pet companion in the late 30s/early 40s, and described as "small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems."

The original Jeep went into production in 1941 and was used exclusively by the United States Military during World War II. It's hard to say where the name "Jeep" came from, although many believe that it's a slur on the military designation "GP", or "Government Purposes".

Another popular theory is that it was named after a character from the Popeye comic strip called "Eugene the Jeep". Eugene the Jeep was Popeye's pet companion in the late 30s/early 40s, and described as "small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems."

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The original Jeep went into production in 1941 and was used exclusively by the United States Military during World War II. It's hard to say where the name "Jeep" came from, although many believe that it's a slur on the military designation "GP", or "Government Purposes".

Another popular theory is that it was named after a character from the Popeye comic strip called "Eugene the Jeep". Eugene the Jeep was Popeye's pet companion in the late 30s/early 40s, and described as "small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems."

3. Chevy Corvette: 1953 vs. Today

The first Corvette was designed to be a concept car for the 1953 Motorama display at the New York Auto Show, but garnered enough attention to be offered publicly. The car got its name from Chevrolet's chief photographer at the time, Myron Scott, who named it after a type of small, maneuverable warship.

The first Corvette was designed to be a concept car for the 1953 Motorama display at the New York Auto Show, but garnered enough attention to be offered publicly. The car got its name from Chevrolet's chief photographer at the time, Myron Scott, who named it after a type of small, maneuverable warship.

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The first Corvette was designed to be a concept car for the 1953 Motorama display at the New York Auto Show, but garnered enough attention to be offered publicly. The car got its name from Chevrolet's chief photographer at the time, Myron Scott, who named it after a type of small, maneuverable warship.

4. Lincoln Continental: 1939 vs. Today

The very first Lincoln Continental was designed to be Edsel Ford's personal one-off ride. When he received the vehicle, he brought it along on vacation to Florida where many of his wealthy friends were captivated by its long, sleek design. During that trip he sent a telegram back with the order of 1,000 more Lincoln Continentals to be made.

The very first Lincoln Continental was designed to be Edsel Ford's personal one-off ride. When he received the vehicle, he brought it along on vacation to Florida where many of his wealthy friends were captivated by its long, sleek design. During that trip he sent a telegram back with the order of 1,000 more Lincoln Continentals to be made.

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The very first Lincoln Continental was designed to be Edsel Ford's personal one-off ride. When he received the vehicle, he brought it along on vacation to Florida where many of his wealthy friends were captivated by its long, sleek design. During that trip he sent a telegram back with the order of 1,000 more Lincoln Continentals to be made.

5. Ford F-Series: 1948 vs. Today

The very first F-Series truck rolled off the assembly line in November 1947. It was the first Ford truck with a dedicated truck platform, no longer relying on a car chassis like their previous trucks.

The very first F-Series truck rolled off the assembly line in November 1947. It was the first Ford truck with a dedicated truck platform, no longer relying on a car chassis like their previous trucks.

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The very first F-Series truck rolled off the assembly line in November 1947. It was the first Ford truck with a dedicated truck platform, no longer relying on a car chassis like their previous trucks.

6. Volkswagen Beetle: 1932 vs. Today

The Volkswagen Beetle was formulated by Adolf Hitler and Porsche to be a compact, economical, and reliable vehicle that could be mass produced for Germany's new network of roadways. Volkswagen literally translates into "people's car" in German.

The Volkswagen Beetle was formulated by Adolf Hitler and Porsche to be a compact, economical, and reliable vehicle that could be mass produced for Germany's new network of roadways. Volkswagen literally translates into "people's car" in German.

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The Volkswagen Beetle was formulated by Adolf Hitler and Porsche to be a compact, economical, and reliable vehicle that could be mass produced for Germany's new network of roadways. Volkswagen literally translates into "people's car" in German.

7. Fiat 500: 1957 vs. Today

The first Fiat 500 was designed and built in Italy to be an economical and efficient vehicle for post-war Europe and featured a highly popular sun roof for soaking up the rays.

The first Fiat 500 was designed and built in Italy to be an economical and efficient vehicle for post-war Europe and featured a highly popular sun roof for soaking up the rays.

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The first Fiat 500 was designed and built in Italy to be an economical and efficient vehicle for post-war Europe and featured a highly popular sun roof for soaking up the rays.

8. Chevy Malibu: 1964 vs. Today

The first Chevy Malibu was designed as a subseries to the Chevy Chevelle and was available in a full range of body styles– the four-door sedan, two-door Sport Coupe hardtop, convertible and two-seat station wagon.

The first Chevy Malibu was designed as a subseries to the Chevy Chevelle and was available in a full range of body styles– the four-door sedan, two-door Sport Coupe hardtop, convertible and two-seat station wagon.

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The first Chevy Malibu was designed as a subseries to the Chevy Chevelle and was available in a full range of body styles– the four-door sedan, two-door Sport Coupe hardtop, convertible and two-seat station wagon.

9. Dodge Challenger: 1969 vs. Today

The Dodge "Silver Challenger" was technically the first car to carry that name in 1958, but it wasn't until 1969 that the Challenger we know today rolled off the assembly line.

The Dodge "Silver Challenger" was technically the first car to carry that name in 1958, but it wasn't until 1969 that the Challenger we know today rolled off the assembly line.

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The Dodge "Silver Challenger" was technically the first car to carry that name in 1958, but it wasn't until 1969 that the Challenger we know today rolled off the assembly line.

10. Chevy Camaro: 1967 vs. Today

The Chevy Camaro made its debut as a direct competitor to the Ford Mustang. When the automotive press asked Chevrolet what the word "Camaro" meant, they were told it was "a small, vicious animal that eats Mustangs."

The Chevy Camaro made its debut as a direct competitor to the Ford Mustang. When the automotive press asked Chevrolet what the word "Camaro" meant, they were told it was "a small, vicious animal that eats Mustangs."

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The Chevy Camaro made its debut as a direct competitor to the Ford Mustang. When the automotive press asked Chevrolet what the word "Camaro" meant, they were told it was "a small, vicious animal that eats Mustangs."

11. Honda Civic: 1972 vs. Today

The first Honda Civic sold in the U.S. for about $2,200 in 1973 and pushed roughly 50 hp. During the 1973 oil crisis, the Honda Civic became a favorite among American buyers.

The first Honda Civic sold in the U.S. for about $2,200 in 1973 and pushed roughly 50 hp. During the 1973 oil crisis, the Honda Civic became a favorite among American buyers.

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The first Honda Civic sold in the U.S. for about $2,200 in 1973 and pushed roughly 50 hp. During the 1973 oil crisis, the Honda Civic became a favorite among American buyers.

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