back to top
CULTURE
 / 

This TV Reporter Challenged Beauty Standards By Going On Air Without Makeup

"Women have so much to offer. It is silly to think a shade of lipstick would make me a better reporter."

Meet Kamady Rudd, a reporter for WZZM 13 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

@kamady / Via instagram.com

Despite waking up at 2:30 every morning, by the time Rudd goes on the air her face is fully decked out with lipstick, false lashes, and a contour, to boot.

@kamady / Via instagram.com

But on Feb. 19, Rudd decided to change her routine and become a "guinea pig" in her own experiment by going on air for a week without any makeup.

Here are four of her no-makeup looks from the week.
@kamady / Via instagram.com

Here are four of her no-makeup looks from the week.

"I ran the no-makeup idea past our [news director] before going sans makeup, knowing she’d be supportive," Rudd told BuzzFeed. "She was totally on board. It was during a week-long project we were doing on body image, so it fit right in."

Facebook: video.php

"My first priority on the job is, and always will be, the story. My appearance will always come second," Rudd said. "If that’s not the priority, I think we, as reporters, are doing our viewers a disservice."

While Rudd was worried that the experiment might shift her focus away from the stories she covered and that she would receive negative viewer feedback, to her surprise, she was swarmed with positive reactions.

"I feel like I’m being repetitive and a little cliché in responses, but I’m dead serious, I never in a million years expected for every response to be kind. The fact that our viewers noticed, but didn’t think much of it — to me — says a lot about people," Rudd said.
@Kamady / Via instagram.com

"I feel like I’m being repetitive and a little cliché in responses, but I’m dead serious, I never in a million years expected for every response to be kind. The fact that our viewers noticed, but didn’t think much of it — to me — says a lot about people," Rudd said.

Bias against female reporters based on their appearance has always been a problem plaguing the media industry, and it's one that Rudd has experienced firsthand. "I used to only anchor and report sports," Rudd said. "I once had an agent, who was trying to represent me, tell me I needed to be more 'glamorous' on the sideline."

But between driving four to five hours away to shoot a game, writing, editing, and creating a highlight reel all in the Louisiana heat, Rudd considered it a win if her makeup was even done at all.
@kamady / Via instagram.com

But between driving four to five hours away to shoot a game, writing, editing, and creating a highlight reel all in the Louisiana heat, Rudd considered it a win if her makeup was even done at all.

All in all, Rudd considers her makeup-free week a success. "This experiment proved to me that there is more good in people than bad. I’ve always thought the negative feedback is the loudest, but not this time," Rudd said.

"Women have so much to offer. It is silly to think a shade of lipstick would make me a better reporter. And I appreciate every single positive thing that’s come from this experience."
@Kamady / Via instagram.com

"Women have so much to offer. It is silly to think a shade of lipstick would make me a better reporter. And I appreciate every single positive thing that’s come from this experience."

Connect with As/Is