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8 Things You Might Not Know About Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Following the tragic death of Stella Young, here are eight things that many of us don't know about the genetic disorder.

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1. Osteogenesis Imperfecta is a genetic disorder, causing bones to break easily.

It affect the body's ability to make strong and healthy bones, sometimes leading to hundreds of fractures in a lifetime.
physio-pedia.com

It affect the body's ability to make strong and healthy bones, sometimes leading to hundreds of fractures in a lifetime.

2. Osteogenesis Imperfecta can be both dominant and recessive.

Dominant Osteogenesis Imperfecta occurs when someone doesn't have enough type I collagen - or a poor quality collagen - due to mutations in the genes.Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta occurs when other gene mutations inhibit and interfere with the body's collagen production.
osteogenesisimperfecta.org

Dominant Osteogenesis Imperfecta occurs when someone doesn't have enough type I collagen - or a poor quality collagen - due to mutations in the genes.

Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta occurs when other gene mutations inhibit and interfere with the body's collagen production.

3. What's collagen?

Collagen is major protein in the body's connective tissue. Bones are formed around collagen, like a scaffold.

4. There are eight main types of Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

Types 2, 3, 7, and 8 are most severe, whereas 4, 5, and 6 are moderate. Type 1 is quite mild, and the most common.
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Types 2, 3, 7, and 8 are most severe, whereas 4, 5, and 6 are moderate. Type 1 is quite mild, and the most common.

5. There is no cure.

Symptoms of Osteogenesis Imperfecta can be managed, with physical therapy, medication, use of wheelchairs, and surgery options.
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Symptoms of Osteogenesis Imperfecta can be managed, with physical therapy, medication, use of wheelchairs, and surgery options.

6. It is most often inherited.

Whilst cases of Osteogenesis Imperfecta exist that cannot be linked to parents, more often than not it is passed down from one or both parents.
Flickr: 25228175@N08 / Creative Commons

Whilst cases of Osteogenesis Imperfecta exist that cannot be linked to parents, more often than not it is passed down from one or both parents.

7. An estimated one in every 12,000 - 15,000 babies is born with Ostegenesis Imperfecta.

8. And this: