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14 Words You Should Avoid Putting On Your Resume At All Costs

It doesn't matter how ~creative~ you think you are...

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But according to experts at LinkedIn, there are certain stereotypical words that are used quite a lot, but that actually say very little... and chances are you probably have them in your resume.

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We often use these clichés because they're easy and we don't have to think about them too much. They help us feign experience and seem like we belong to a particular field.

However, the problem is that they don't say anything of actual substance to your potential new boss and will therefore only end up putting you at the bottom of the pile. So, without further ado, here are some words the experts say you should avoid:

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1.

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What it sounds like to you: "The ability to use one's imagination and originality to solve problems or address issues."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Let me guess... you studied communication."

2.

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What it sounds like to you: "Related to the design and implementation of plans to achieve a specific purpose or goal."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah... "

3.

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What it sounds like to you: "The act of guiding and cultivating a group of individuals to facilitate success and achievement."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Great, another 'leader' to add to the pile."

4.

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What it sounds like to you: "Someone who has experience managing or supervising others."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "You're boasting about a basic skill that you need in any job. Well done. Bye."

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6.

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What it sounds like to you: "Having a system in place that enables one to tackle tasks and to-dos in a timely and efficient manner."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "So what I'm hearing is that you really like colorful Post-It notes... "

7.

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What it sounds like to you: "Said by a person who feels stimulated or interested in doing something."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "This means you're going to arrive every morning full of energy and greet every employee with a kiss while you give out donuts and everybody showers you with glitter while you sing?"

8.

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What it sounds like to you: "Someone who achieves results."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Let me guess, all you do is win, win, win, no matter what?"

9.

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What it sounds like to you: "Said by someone who specializes in or has in-depth knowledge of a particular field."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Ah, and how exactly does one become an expert in Twitter?"

10.

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What it sounds like to you: "Actively taking control and deciding what to do at any given moment, anticipating future obstacles."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Proactive or ***hole with initiative?"

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11.

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What it sounds like to you: "Something said by a person who has similar experiences in any given field."

What it can seem like to your future boss: *Yawns and throws resume in the garbage*

12.

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What it sounds like to you: "Having a particular skill set or knowledge base that gives you a competitive advantage over others in the broader field within which you work."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "How many business and administration "specialists" can there be in the world?"

13.

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What it sounds like to you: "Directing attention or interest towards a subject or a problem away from previous assumptions, in order to try to resolve it properly."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "I'm going to focus on ignoring this resume and finding a less clichéd one."

14.

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What it sounds like to you: "Changing or altering something, introducing novelties."

What it can seem like to your future boss: "Wow, tell me more."

If this has left you in a state of utter dread and despair, don't worry! Here are some things you can do right now, according to those same experts:

E!

1) Work on your vocabulary. Play around with words and sentences to give your resume a personal touch. You only have 5 to 10 seconds to make a good first impression on the person who could hire you, and the first thing they see is your LinkedIn profile, so you already know what to do.

2) Be Direct. And never talk in the third person. It comes across as impersonal and it doesn't grab their attention. Write in a professional and positive style, but show your personality at the same time.

3) Show off your professional experience to the maximum. Put your previous jobs in a list and describe your duties in colloquial language. It's 12 times more likely that they'll look at your profile if you put down your previous roles.

4) Make sure your actions speak louder than words. Yes, your vocabulary is important, but how about instead of using even a single word to describe your accomplishments and credentials, you could upload a presentation that shows it? It should be completely personal and allow you to stand out from the crowd.

This post was translated from Spanish.

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