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    Updated on Aug 19, 2020. Posted on Nov 23, 2013

    21 Breathtaking Coastlines To Add To Your Bucket List

    The coastess with the mostess.

    1. Amalfi Coast — Italy

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    The only land route to the Amalfi Coast is the 25-mile-long (40 km) Strada Statale 163. The Amalfi Coast is also famously known for its production of limoncello.

    2. Cliffs of Moher and Others — Ireland

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    The Cliffs of Moher rise 390 feet (120 meters) above the Atlantic Ocean. They have been featured in many films including The Princess Bride and Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

    3. Ha Long Bay — Vietnam

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    The name Hạ Long is derived from the Sino-Vietnamese 下 龍, meaning "descending dragon." According to ancient legend, Ha Long Bay was created by the dragons who descended upon Vietnam to protect themselves from invaders.

    4. Antarctic Coast — Antarctica

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    The Antarctic coastline measures 11,165 miles (17,968 kilometers) and is composed mainly of ice, both floating on the ocean and resting on the ground.

    5. Scottish Coast — Scotland

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    In addition to the mainland, Scotland is made up of more than 790 islands.

    6. Santorini and Mykonos — Greece

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    Though a relatively small country, Greece actually features the 11th largest coastline in the world due to the presence of its many islands (roughly figured between 1,200 to 1,600).

    7. Atlantic Ocean Coast — Morocco

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    The Strait of Gibraltar runs along Morocco's northern border and separates Europe and Africa by a short distance of only 7.7 nautical miles.

    8. Western Coast and Lofoten Islands — Norway

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    Norway is particularly famous for the prevalence of its fjords, deep grooves cut into the land, which were flooded by the sea following the end of the ice age.

    9. Icelandic Coast — Iceland

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    Iceland is closer to continental Europe than to mainland North America and is the world's 18th largest island.

    10. Krabi — Thailand

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    In 2012, 22 million tourists visited Thailand, a record-breaking number.

    11. Cape Town — South Africa

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    Table Mountain, which sits just miles from the South African coast, towers over 3,300 feet (1,000 meters) into the air.

    12. California Coast — United States

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    According to the 2000 Census, roughly a third of households in coastal California had incomes exceeding $75,000, compared to 17.6% in the Central Valley and 22.5% at the national average.

    13. Rio de Janeiro — Brazil

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    The entrance point to Rio de Janeiro is is marked by a point of land called Sugar Loaf (Pão de Açúcar) — a calling card of the city.

    14. Great Ocean Road, Victoria — Australia

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    The Great Ocean Road was built by returned soldiers between 1919 and 1932 and is dedicated to those killed during World War I, making the road the world’s largest war memorial. The road passes by many famous natural landmarks, including the famous limestone formations known as the “Twelve Apostles.”

    15. Tenerife, Canary Islands — Spain

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    The island of Tenerife is actually composed of the fusion of three underwater mountain ranges that volcanically formed over 3 million years ago.

    16. Atlantic Coast — Portugal

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    Portugal is divided by the Tagus River, which separates the rugged north from the rolling plains in the south. Many of Portugal's largest rivers originate in Spain, travel through Portugal, and flow into the Atlantic Ocean.

    17. The Beagle Channel, Ushuaia — Argentina

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    The Beagle Channel was named after the ship HMS Beagle during its first hydrographic survey of the coasts of South America, which lasted from 1826 to 1830.

    18. Cabo San Lucas — Mexico

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    Every few years the tide lowers enough to allow visitors to walk under the Cabo San Lucas arch.

    19. New England Seaboard — United States

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    The Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest of all the oceans at 33 to 37 parts per thousand.

    20. Muscat and Wadi Shab — Oman

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    Oman is a 1,000-mile-long (1,700 kilometers) coastal plain at the southeast tip of the Arabian Peninsula. The country is roughly the same size as Kansas.

    21. Normandy Coast — France

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    The Normandy Coast consists of a 360 miles of seashore. Only 13% of the region is wooded; the rest consists of rich farmland.

    Special thanks to our friends at Shutterstock for providing us with such stunning photographs.

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