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13 Easy Tips To Get Your Instagram Feed Poppin’

Discrete on the street.

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On March 19, Sydney's Paula Broom and Annette Widitz will join photographers around the world in documenting human connections at every hour for 24 hours straight.

The initiative is called the 24 Hour Project, and aims to raise awareness about human trafficking. While preparing for the project, Broom and Widitz compiled some handy tips for taking powerful street photos with just a phone camera.

1. Keep it simple.

"Don't clutter the scene. Focus more on what to leave out of the frame, rather than what to leave in." - Annette Widitz
Instagram: @dawa_life

"Don't clutter the scene. Focus more on what to leave out of the frame, rather than what to leave in." - Annette Widitz

2. Give a sense of scale.

"In street photography, the best way to show scale is by including humans in the frame." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"In street photography, the best way to show scale is by including humans in the frame." - Paula Broom

3. Think of your frame before you shoot.

"Especially if you're shooting a moving subject, anticipate where you want them in the frame." - Annette Widitz
Instagram: @dawa_life

"Especially if you're shooting a moving subject, anticipate where you want them in the frame." - Annette Widitz

4. Get down low.

"If you're shooting children or animals, get down to their level. This allows the viewer to connect with the subject." - Annette Widitz
Instagram: @dawa_life

"If you're shooting children or animals, get down to their level. This allows the viewer to connect with the subject." - Annette Widitz

5. Keep an eye out for nice backdrops.

"Great architecture and landscapes make the photo much more interesting." - Annette Widitz
Instagram: @dawa_life

"Great architecture and landscapes make the photo much more interesting." - Annette Widitz

6. Use keys other than the main photo trigger.

"Many people don't realise you can take photos with other keys, like the volume buttons on the side or even on your earphones." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"Many people don't realise you can take photos with other keys, like the volume buttons on the side or even on your earphones." - Paula Broom

7. Use the burst mode for moving subjects.

"Hold down the main camera shutter to take a burst of photos. I also turn off the HDR mode because it accentuates blur." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"Hold down the main camera shutter to take a burst of photos. I also turn off the HDR mode because it accentuates blur." - Paula Broom

8. Experiment with slow shutter apps.

"Apps like Slow Shutter give you a sense of movement and make the image more dynamic." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"Apps like Slow Shutter give you a sense of movement and make the image more dynamic." - Paula Broom

9. Play with shadows and reflections.

"I love shooting in the middle of the day. It creates shadows that give dimension to a crowd shot." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"I love shooting in the middle of the day. It creates shadows that give dimension to a crowd shot." - Paula Broom

10. Make use of backlighting or overhead lighting.

"Don't be afraid to shoot into the sun. This creates dramatic silhouettes and don't identify specific people." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"Don't be afraid to shoot into the sun. This creates dramatic silhouettes and don't identify specific people." - Paula Broom

11. Use leading lines.

"Leading lines will guide your viewer's eye to your subject." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"Leading lines will guide your viewer's eye to your subject." - Paula Broom

12. Experiment with different filters.

"I love using the noir filter. If the image has strong light and dark elements, black and white will work really well." - Paula Broom
Instagram: @paulabroom

"I love using the noir filter. If the image has strong light and dark elements, black and white will work really well." - Paula Broom

13. Let your photo tell a story.

"If the photo has a story to tell, the image becomes much more interesting. Think: what does the image say to you?" - Annette Widitz
Instagram: @dawa_life

"If the photo has a story to tell, the image becomes much more interesting. Think: what does the image say to you?" - Annette Widitz

Follow Annette Widitz and Paula Broom for their hourly update on the 24 Hour Project.