DIY Grade-Boosting Homework Station

A top-notch education starts at home, and a dedicated homework area could help your kids complete their assignments efficiently and successfully-with the least amount of kicking and screaming. Whatever your space or budget limitations may be, any devoted space for study is better than sprawling out on the floor in front of the television. Not convinced? Build it-whether it’s a nook in the kitchen or a room all its own-and the good grades will come. Here are a few pointers to keep in mind as you get started. -Tabitha Sukhai, thisoldhouse.comSEE ALL: How to Create the Ultimate Homework Station

Location, Location, Location

Consider your kid’s age and learning style when deciding where to site a study space. The U.S. Department of Education recommends a quiet, well-lighted place that’s fully stocked with the necessary materials and supplies for your child’s grade level. Younger kids who need homework help and supervision, for example, might benefit from working in the kitchen, where rolling out a supply cart can indicate the start of study time, and you can do quiet chores or prepare dinner while they work.

RELATED: Clever Kitchen Offices

Keep It Down

Older kids might do well with a bit of privacy and isolation, so carve out space in their bedroom or the dining room, where you can hide the work area with a room divider if necessary. Above all, make sure you respect your kid’s academic efforts by mandating household quiet time while schoolwork is being completed, especially if he or she is working in a common area. You may be winding down after a long day’s work, but it’d be hard for anyone to concentrate while overhearing half of a lively telephone conversation or the latest episode of Wheel of Fortune. Seems like a no-brainer, but has to be said.
RELATED: 27 Inspirational Study Stations You Can Re-Create

Do HW in Timed Heats

A consistent study routine with about 30 minutes of downtime before getting started is widely recommended. “Use a power period of 45 minutes of work and 5 minutes of break time to promote productivity and efficiency. Create a workflow process with your kids and it will make all the difference,” advises Ellen Delap of Professional-Organizer.com.

Elizabeth Hagen, author of Organize with Confidence (and mom of five!), suggests supplying kids with a timer so they can learn to focus on their homework for an allotted period, and work toward finishing so that they can watch their favorite TV show or go play.SEE MORE: How to Create the Ultimate Homework Station

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