Promoted

Bananas Used To Be Totally Different In The ’50s

And the ones you see at the grocery store might change again in a couple decades! What!

1. This is a Candevish banana.

2. They look familiar.

3. In fact, they all look basically the same.

4. That’s because every banana is a genetic clone of all other bananas.

They all trace their history back to one banana, and because of that, they’re all sterile. Farmers must manually cut and plant the roots to grow new fruit.

5. Which creates a genetic uniformity that is dangerous for this likable fruit.

Since they’re all identical, if one banana is vulnerable, they’re all vulnerable.

6. You see, back in the 1950s, the banana people knew and loved was wiped out by disease.

7. These, ladies and gentlemen, are Gros Michel bananas.

8. Since becoming widely popular in the 1800s, Gros Michel was the variety you would see at the produce stand.

9. According to legend, this kind of banana tasted way better. It was more soft and creamy.

Here is a guy tasting a Gros Michel banana. They’re still grown in some parts of Southeast Asia.

10. But a disease known as “Race 1” began to kill them off in the ’20s, and by the 1950s banana farmers had turned to the Candevish variant to meet demand.

11. The song “Yes, We Have No Bananas” was written about this terrible crisis.

12. Now, a similar disease is after the Candevish. It’s already devastated farms in Asia, the Pacific, and Australia.

Researchers say there’s little doubt that “Race 4” will travel to South and Latin America, where the vast majority of bananas are grown for export to the United States.

15. What strange new variety will we get next?

If “Race 4” runs its evil course, that is, and kills off our familiar banana.

16. Will it even taste OK??

17. Whatever happens, we’ll all get through it together, guys.

Check out more articles on BuzzFeed.com!

This post was created by a member of BuzzFeed Community, where anyone can post awesome lists and creations. Learn more or post your buzz!

 
 

    Contributions

    Here Are The Top Stories
    • The South Carolina Senate voted 37-3 in the first vote to remove the Confederate battle flag from statehouse grounds. The bill is expected to pass a two-thirds majority in its third reading on Tuesday, then move to the House.
    • Bill Cosby testified in 2005 that he obtained sedatives to give to women he wanted to have sex with, the AP reports.
    • More than 1 million people are expected to attend Pope Francis' mass in Ecuador on Monday.
    Get The News App

    Now Buzzing