• 10) Aldo Nova—“Monkey On Your Back”

    From “Subject: Aldo Nova” comes a cautionary tale regarding heroin abuse…and where it can lead to. Kind of preachy at the end, but still as good as in 1983 as it is now!

  • 09) Motorhead: “Dead Men Tell No Tales”

    The ultimate band when it come to the whole “SD&RR” routine, this song is about a friend breaking off a friendship…over that friend’s herion use. In this case, “Dead Men Tell No Tales” means EXACTLY that!

  • 08) Ministry: “Just One Fix”

    From the 90’s comes this disturbing little ditty about going cold-turkey from drug use. And if you think the song is heavy-duty, check out the video if you get a chance (make sure you’ve had nothing to eat before watching it, btw).

  • 07) Pantera: “Suicide Note Parts 1&2”

    These Texas hellions created a real anti-type with this pair of songs (from “The Great Southern Trendkill”) about a man who used one too many times, and now is about to check himself out. If you do a bit of guided imagery to the first song? At the end, you feel like you are beeing wheeled to the morgue. Spooky!

  • Black Sabbath: “Snowblind”

    One of Ozzy-voxed Sabbath songs, this actually talks about dying from a cocaine overdose (“Lying snowblind in the sun—feel that my ice age has come.”)

  • 05) Queensryche—“The Needle Lies”

    From “Operation:MINDCRIME” comes a truism about herion addiction, one that the main character in the album (Nikiki) is mearning much too late as he attempts to get away from Doctor X.

  • 04) Lynrd Skynyrd—“That Smell”

    From the classic rock era comes one of LS’ greatest hits—a obsrvation piece about a friend who is killing themself via drug/alcohol abuse. “The smell of death’s around you!” sums it up rather well.

  • 03) Motorhead—“Iron Horse (Born To Lose)”

    This song was written by Lemmy about the time he roomed with the Hell’s Angels president (at the time). “When you’ve got nothing, you’ve got nothing to lose,” is still as true as today as it was back in the late 70’s

  • 02) Steppenwolf—“The Pusher”

    Though in the song, John Kay tries to see the listener on the difference between a “dealer” and a “pusher.” (“Dealer” is now used to mean the same thing as “pusher”). In the end, he does both of them no favors, for in his “total war” against the “pusher man,” he reveals that being a pusher is no better.

  • 01) Accept—“Bulletproof”

    From the album OBJECTION OVERRULED comes a “case study” song about a friend who rejects all to feed his addiction…then kills himself in a PCP-induced psychosis by doing a Superman imitation off of a tall building. My favorite one of them all.

  • Needed Caveats:

    Ok, a few things before I go: A) These ten songs are only the ones I know about as of right now. Perhaps you folks know of a few more. In that case—let’s hear from you!