Fresh2Def
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    • Fresh2Def

      Here’s the list I came up with after reading this list: 1. Buzzfeed is seeking validation for the format they’re known for.
      2. Buzzfeed often experiences feelings of frustrations because it cannot express its thoughts in any other way other than a list.
      3. Buzzfeed has a hard time recognizing that lists are a simple way to organize one’s thoughts.
      4. Buzzfeed does not recognize that though lists are important, they will never be superior to more traditional forms of writing because of the limitations the format requires in order to be simple.
      5. Buzzfeed wishes it had intellectual depth.
      6. Buzzfeed often cries by itself in the closet at night wondering why it can’t people don’t take it as a serious news source.
      7. Buzzfeed really really wants your approval.
      8. Buzzfeed talks to itself whenever it thinks nobody is listening.
      9. Buzzfeed doesn’t realize that people make fun of Buzzfeed not because of its use of lists, but because of its idiotic content.
      10. Buzzfeed is a narcissist machine. tl;dr: A list is only as important as what it’s listing. Buzzfeed is good at making cat gif lists, but not at offering intellectual depth.

    • Fresh2Def

      2Pac was shot during an attempted robbery as he was leaving the building where Biggie’s studio was located. 2Pac was very paranoid, and he suspected Biggie had something to do with it, especially after Biggie released the track “Who Shot Ya?” That’s how the West Coast vs. East Coast beef started, though Biggie was never all in on the beef, since he still considered 2Pac to be one of his close friends. The shooting Chet is referencing is the one that started the beef, the one you’re referencing is the one that killed 2Pac. Get your facts right if you’re gonna try to diss someone, or else you sound like a tool.

    • Fresh2Def

      Once again, you’re wrong my friend. Most of them already live in Connecticut. Just look up Greenwich, you’ll see most of the heads of all the major financial institutions live out there. As far as Jersey, I’ve never heard of anyone leaving New York for New Jersey. Some people I know have moved upstate, but you want to know the truth: NOBODY WANTS TO LEAVE THE CITY. And when they do, they seriously regret it, which is why they usually buy a weekend apartment here. NY ain’t losing it’s swagger my man, don’t worry about us. We’re cool.

    • Fresh2Def

      HAHAHAH, you obviously have no understanding of NY business history. EVERY SINGLE business in the world is fighting to get a piece of the action here because EVERY PERSON in the world comes to this city. You think a business will move out and lose all the eyeballs it gets? New York has been the heart of the world since the 1950s, and it’s had the highest tax burden out of every state for who knows how long. You think companies are leaving because someone said they’ll raise taxes? I’ll tell you what they’ll do. They’ll lobby the fuck out of it to avoid facing a hike, and compromise by getting loopholes they can use to soften the blow. Personally, I don’t see any companies ever trading New York for Missouri or Arkansas any time soon.

    • Fresh2Def

      Personally, I’m not a toxicologist, I just did a lot of MDMA in my day, and I read all the available research on the effects the drug. It’s pretty clean drug - compared to alcohol. It was initially created to be an antidepressant, however, it does have some nasty side-effects if kept unchecked. These are things you don’t have to be a toxicologist to know. You just have to be conscious of the consequences of what you’re doing, rather than throwing yourself into a pit without knowing how deep it is.

    • Fresh2Def

      There’s no such thing as an overdose of MDMA. People who dies from taking too much MDMA usually die as a result of one of its effects. One possibility is dying of a heat-stroke or other dehydration related effects. People often either underestimate or overestimate how thirsty they are and that can lead to serious circumstances for their health. https://www.erowid.org/chemicals/mdma/mdma_health_water.shtml

    • Fresh2Def

      And yet you’re here commenting on his brand…. makes you think right? He just acquired a share of your mind by making a video that caused an emotional reaction in you… whether it’s good or bad, it doesn’t matter, since you’ll probably talk about it with your friends and they’ll make up their minds about the work themselves, and it will, at the least, intrigue them… I assume you’ve never worked in advertising, since you don’t see the brilliance in that… selling one’s soul is the whole point of promotion. Whoever gets their ideas to stick to people’s minds is the ultimate victor…

    • Fresh2Def

      Brilliant marketing…. crazy brilliant. A few years ago I shot a viral commercial for Adidas of a three women robbing their Soho store. Adidas rejected it because they thought it was it wouldn’t create a positive brand association. The concept of this piece is perfect though. It strengthens Wang’s brand by depreciating his customers. Hysteria only generates further hysteria. The Nazis knew this. And so did the Beatles. Just watch their debut at Ed Sullivan. It wasn’t that different from this.

    • Fresh2Def

      Ah, please! Do you not understand that Rolling Stone is in the business of selling magazines? Is putting someone on the cover of a magazine glorifying of that person (regardless of who they are or have done)? Not, it is not because it depends on the context. Just think, Time Magazine called Hitler “Man Of The Year” in 1938. Now that’s glorifying, if you need an objective example. Stop being so sensitive and read the content before throwing a fit. Haven’t you ever heard: don’t judge a book by it’s cover. No sane person thinks this guy is a rock star. You’ve made that assumption by purposefully distorting the facts and predicting that innocent people will be killed because of a magazine cover. Get over yourself….

    • Fresh2Def

      Why do you want to say n—-a so much? Does it deeply hurt you not being able to say a word that carries a historical weight of tearing a people from their continent, transporting them in the hull of ship infested rats and disease in a trip less than an 1/8 of them survived so they could arrive in a place where they’d be forced into labor? And if anyone of them complained they’d get lashed by a whip? A word that signifies the separation of race, which less than 50 years ago was still place in law, making it illegal for a black to marry a white? Yes, there are black people who use n—-a in their everyday vernacular, but I don’t think you fully understand the difference between intentions in the use of the word.

    • Fresh2Def

      The reality is there are differences between the pejorative/derogatory use of the word used to cut someone down, ie: a joke, or a racial comment. The reason why rappers get away with saying n—-a in their lyrics is because it’s street language. If you’ve been to New York (the birthplace of hip-hop), or if you live here, you’d know that most latinos and blacks use the word sparsely throughout their language as an informal noun. They’re not attacking each other, they’re just talking, or rapping in the case of a rapper. In most cases, white people saying n—-a are frowned upon or cast as racists because many of those whites are using the word in a derogatory manner. TL;DR : Intentions are what define the word.

    • Fresh2Def

      @reneeb15  I’m going to assume you don’t have too many black friends. There is a distinct difference between the using the word n—-er in the derogatory context of a joke, and the word n—-a in the context of street language.  I’m white and from New York, and most of my friends are black or latino. They use the word n—-a all the time, calling everyone, including me, a n—-a. They often encourage me to use it in that context, often challenging what they see as my fear of the word. Personally I don’t feel comfortable throwing that word around because of its historical context, there are far too many people who still see black and white, and would surely misunderstand.  Ultimately, it’s the context in which the word is used that defines the intentions of the speaker. There’s a difference between saying n—-er in a derogatory manner (such as racial joke), and using it as street slang, as can be heard anywhere in NYC.  Peace.

    • Fresh2Def

      @reneeb15 I’m going to assume you don’t have too many black friends. There is a distinct difference between the using the word n—-er in the derogatory context of a joke, and the word n—-a in the context of street language. I’m white and from New York, and most of my friends are black or latino. They use the word n—-a all the time, calling everyone, including me, a n—-a. They often encourage me to use it in that context, often challenging what they see as my fear of the word. Personally I don’t feel comfortable throwing that word around because of its historical context, there are far too many people who still see black and white, and would surely misunderstand.  In case you live on another planet, there’s a little show called the Boondocks, and they have an episode where they discuss this paradox that you’ve presented. I hope you understand it’s satire, so hopefully it won’t hurt your feelings: http://youtu.be/9NY1y1aggUA Ultimately, it’s the context in which the word is used that defines the intentions of the speaker. There’s a difference between saying n—-er in a derogatory manner (such as racial joke), and using it as street slang, as can be heard anywhere in NYC. Peace.