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How Much Do You Actually Know About HIV?

Test your knowledge. Help stop the virus by learning all you can about HIV testing, prevention, and treatment. And talk to a healthcare provider to get more information. There is no cure for HIV, but there is something everyone can do to help stop the virus.

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  1. Correct!
    Wrong!

    True.

    A lot has changed in the 30+ years since the HIV epidemic began. There is no cure for HIV, but today HIV can be a chronic, manageable disease for many people. If you are living with HIV, talk to a healthcare provider about how HIV treatment can help you live a healthier life.

  2. Correct!
    Wrong!

    Black men who have sex with men.

    Black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by HIV in the U.S. It is estimated that 1 in 2, or half of Black MSM in the U.S., will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime. Estimated lifetime risk of getting HIV for other groups is: 1 in 4 for Hispanic MSM; 1 in 11 for white MSM; 1 in 241 for women who have sex with men. Talk to a healthcare provider about your lifetime risk for getting HIV.

  3. Correct!
    Wrong!

    You have so little HIV in your blood, it can’t be measured by a test.

    There is no cure for HIV, but treatment can help lower the amount of virus in your body. It can get so low, it can’t be measured by a test. You still have HIV, but being undetectable helps protect your health and helps lower the risk of passing HIV to someone during sex. The only way to get to and stay undetectable is by taking HIV medicine every day as prescribed by your healthcare provider.

  4. Correct!
    Wrong!

    True.

    HIV is spread through bodily fluids such as blood, semen, vaginal or rectal fluids, and breast milk. It’s most commonly transmitted sexually or through infected injection equipment.

  5. Correct!
    Wrong!

    Anal sex.

    Anal sex without a condom and lube has the highest risk for transmitting HIV. HIV may be able to pass through the thin inner lining of the rectum during sex. HIV can also enter the body through cuts or sores on the penis or through the foreskin or urethra (opening at the tip of the penis). Using a condom and water-based lube can help reduce the risk of transmitting HIV through anal sex. Women who have vaginal sex without a condom are at high risk for getting HIV. HIV can pass through the lining of the vagina and cervix. Men are also at risk since HIV can enter the penis through cuts, sores, and the urethra. Rimming or anilingus is a low risk activity for getting HIV. Oral ulcers, bleeding gums, or having a sexually transmitted disease can increase the risk. But you can reduce the risk even more by placing a cut-open, non-lubricated condom between the mouth and the anus. Dental dams and natural rubber latex sheets will also work! You cannot get HIV from casual kissing!

  6. Correct!
    Wrong!

    Low risk — but that does not mean zero risk.

    Performing oral sex on a man usually carries low risk of getting HIV. But it does carry some risk because HIV can be transmitted through oral ulcers, bleeding gums, and genital sores. Having a sexually transmitted disease can also increase the risk of getting HIV through oral sex.

  7. Correct!
    Wrong!

    About every three to six months.

    If you are sexually active with multiple partners (especially if you are a gay or bisexual man), the CDC recommends that you get tested for HIV every three to six months. But if you feel like you should keep closer tabs on your health, you may want to get tested more frequently. Check out HelpStopTheVirus.com to find a testing site location near you. If you think you were exposed to HIV, don’t wait! Talk to a healthcare provider or seek urgent care ASAP. Medicines are available that may be able to help prevent infection. But they must be started within 72 hours after exposure.

  8. Correct!
    Wrong!

    Up to three months.

    The length of time between exposure and when the virus shows up on a test is called the window period. It can take up to three months. Some tests can detect the virus sooner after exposure than others. If you think you have been exposed, tell your healthcare provider or the person performing the HIV test. They can recommend the right test for you and the right follow-up test after the window period. You should also tell your provider if you have recently had flu-like symptoms such as fever, aches, or vomiting. These symptoms may occur during the acute period of HIV infection, usually within two to four weeks after exposure.

  9. Correct!
    Wrong!

    CD4/T cells.

    CD4 cells (or T cells) are responsible for maintaining your body’s ability to fight off infection. HIV affects your body by attacking these cells and weakening your immune system. This can make it easier for you to get infections and certain cancers.

  10. Correct!
    Wrong!

    By getting tested.

    Testing is the only way to know if you have HIV. There is no way to tell if a person has HIV by looking at them. If you have HIV, you may look and feel fine. You may not have symptoms for many years. That is why testing is so important. If you have multiple partners (especially if you are a gay or bisexual man), the CDC recommends testing every three to six months. So get tested. Check out HelpStopTheVirus.com to find a testing site location near you! When you know your status, you can take steps to protect your health.

How Much Do You Actually Know About HIV?

Increase your knowledge!

Help stop the virus by continuing to learn all you can about HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Things change, and it helps to stay current. Remember, stopping the virus takes all of us. And it can start with you.

Increase your knowledge!
Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
Not bad!

Help stop the virus by continuing to learn all you can about HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Things change, and it helps to stay current. Remember, stopping the virus takes all of us. And it can start with you.

Not bad!
Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app
Great job!

Help stop the virus by continuing to learn all you can about HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. Things change, and it helps to stay current. Remember, stopping the virus takes all of us. And it can start with you.

Great job!
Take quizzes and chill with the BuzzFeed app.
Get the app

Images courtesy of Gilead Sciences, Inc. / Danielle Ceneta for BuzzFeed

All facts from CDC and AIDS.gov.

Help stop the virus by learning all you can about HIV testing, prevention, and treatment. Stopping the virus starts with you.

Find a testing site location near you! And get tested and retested regularly.

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