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10 Things Your Dreams Are Actually Trying To Tell You

There might not be any science behind those "dream dictionaries." But how you dream could tell you something about your health. Sleep Number® beds with SleepIQ® technology are the only beds that use science to help you get your best night's sleep.

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1. Never having nightmares could actually be a sign of sleep apnea.

A study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found nightmare frequency was lower in patients suffering from sleep apnea.
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A study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found nightmare frequency was lower in patients suffering from sleep apnea.

2. Your good (or bad) dreams could be caused by smells in your sleeping space.

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Researchers found that subjects who smelled roses had positive dreams, while the smell of rotten eggs seemed to cause unpleasant dreams.

3. Chronic nightmares could be a sign of posttraumatic stress disorder.

For nightmares to be considered chronic, they usually must occur once a week. Other causes include alcohol abuse, certain medications, and sleep disorders.
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For nightmares to be considered chronic, they usually must occur once a week. Other causes include alcohol abuse, certain medications, and sleep disorders.

4. On the other hand, occasional bad dreams could simply be caused by diet.

While there's evidence that spicy food may interrupt your sleep, bad dreams can also be caused by simply eating anything too close to bedtime.
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While there's evidence that spicy food may interrupt your sleep, bad dreams can also be caused by simply eating anything too close to bedtime.

5. Recurring dreams probably do indicate an unresolved conflict.

However, what happens in your dreams doesn't necessary have anything to do with the cause of those dreams.
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However, what happens in your dreams doesn't necessary have anything to do with the cause of those dreams.

6. Racy dreams? It could be linked to your sleeping position.

A study found that people who sleep on their stomachs are significantly more likely to have racy dreams.
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A study found that people who sleep on their stomachs are significantly more likely to have racy dreams.

7. Dreaming in black and white is typically related to age.

People who grew up with black-and-white televisions are more likely to report greyscale dreams than people only exposed to color televisions.
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People who grew up with black-and-white televisions are more likely to report greyscale dreams than people only exposed to color televisions.

8. Bizarre dreams could just indicate that you're sleeping longer — and better.

A study found that people tended to have more vivid and emotional dreams the longer they were asleep without interruption.
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A study found that people tended to have more vivid and emotional dreams the longer they were asleep without interruption.

9. That sensation that you're falling during sleep? Totally normal.

It's called a hypnic jerk — and you can reduce your risk of having one by avoiding caffeine and reducing stress.
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It's called a hypnic jerk — and you can reduce your risk of having one by avoiding caffeine and reducing stress.

10. Similarly, the feeling of waking up but being unable to move is typically nothing to worry about.

This feeling is called sleep paralysis, and it's rarely linked to any deeper issues. Being over-tired can contribute to this, though, so good sleep is important.
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This feeling is called sleep paralysis, and it's rarely linked to any deeper issues. Being over-tired can contribute to this, though, so good sleep is important.

The more you know, the better you sleep!

SleepIQ® technology gives you the knowledge to adjust for your best sleep.