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Do You Know These Women In STEM?

As part of GWISE's upcoming event In Memoriam Vera Rubin: Women in STEM Poster Exhibition, this quiz is an effort to raise awareness about the groundbreaking achievements made by women in science and technology. If you like this quiz and want more, drop by Stony Brook University SAC Plaza any time between 11.30 to 2.30 pm on May 4th, 2017 for the exhibition, where we will display the work and life of GWISE's favorite women idols! Tag our Facebook page to be entered into the event raffle. Follow, share and spread the message!

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  1. 1. Her work led to the discovery of DNA and helped earn a Nobel Prize for James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins.

    PBS
    Gerty Cori
    Anna Jane Harrison
    Rosalind Franklin
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    "There is probably no other woman scientist with as much controversy surrounding her life and work as Rosalind Franklin." The Nobel Prize for discovering DNA's double helix structure went to Watson, Crick and Wilkins, but the breakthrough would not have been possible without Rosalind Franklin's X-ray diffraction photos of DNA strands.

    Via Facebook: ScienceQuotes
  2. 2. Long before Alan Turing or Larry Page, this mathematician was believed to be the world’s first computer programmer.

    Wikipedia
    Florence Nightingale
    Ada Lovelace
    Lois Haibt
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Augusta Ada King-Noel, Countess of Lovelace was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on the mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. She was the first to recognize that the machine had applications beyond pure calculation, and created the first algorithm intended to be carried out by such a machine.

    Via spiremaths.co.uk
  3. 3. She was the youngest American astronaut and the first American women to travel to space, and was in charge of operating the NASA's Challenger space shuttle's robotic arm.

    New York Times
    Sally Ride
    Kalpana Chawla
    Peggy Whitson
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    An American physicist and astronaut, Sally Ride was the third woman in space overall, after USSR cosmonauts Valentina Tereshkova and Svetlana Savitskaya. Ride remains the youngest American astronaut to have traveled to space, having done so at the age of 32.

    Via pinterest.com
  4. 4. She is the first woman to win a Nobel prize, and received it for her work on Radioactivity.

    Wikipedia
    Ada Byron
    Marie Curie
    Dorothy Hodgkin
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Marie Curie was not only the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, but was the first person and only woman to win twice, the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different fields, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris.

    Via tumblr.com
  5. 5. This chemist and employee of DuPont company is best known for inventing synthetic fibers of exceptional strength and stiffness, Kevlar, which has since been used in everything from bullet proof vests, fighter jets and mobile phones.

    ilmusiana.com
    Stephanie Kwolek
    Temple Grandin
    Alice Ball
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    For her discovery of Kevlar, Kwolek was awarded the DuPont company's Lavoisier Medal for outstanding technical achievement. As of February 2015, she was the only female employee to have received that honor. In 1995 she became the fourth woman to be added to the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

    Via au.pinterest.com
  6. 6. This computer scientist was also a United States Navy rear admiral. She invented the first compiler for a computer programming language and has both a missile destroyer and a supercomputer named after her.

    Wikipedia
    Anita Borg
    Grace Hopper
    Margaret Hamilton
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    In 1944, Grace Hopper was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer and invented the first compiler for a computer programming language. She popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first high-level programming languages.

    Via Youtube
  7. 7. This primatologist has been described as “the woman who redefined man” for her study of social and familial behavior of chimpanzees.

    pinterest.com
    Dian Fossey
    Rachel Carlson
    Jane Goodall
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Considered to be the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees, Goodall is best known for her 55-year study of social and family interactions of wild chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania. Goodall's research at Gombe Stream is best known to the scientific community for challenging two long-standing beliefs of the day: that only humans could construct and use tools, and that chimpanzees were vegetarians.

    Via tumblr.com
  8. 8. She won the Nobel prize in 1963 for proposing the nuclear shell model of the atomic nucleus, becoming only the second female Nobel laureate in Physics (after Marie Curie).

    history.com
    Irene Joliot-Curie
    Maria Goeppert-Mayer
    Marguerite Perey
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Maria Goeppert-Mayer, a graduate of the University of Göttingen in Germany, moved to United States with her husband. During World War II, she joined the Manhattan Project where she worked on isotope separation and developed a mathematical model for the structure of nuclear shells which lead to her Nobel Prize.

    Via azquotes.com
  9. 9. In 1942, this Austrian-born actress invented the frequency hopping technology that laid the groundwork for wireless communication.

    Pinterest.com
    Hedy Lamarr
    Charlotte Auerbach
    Rachel Carson
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    At the beginning of World War II, Lamarr and composer George Antheil developed a radio guidance system for Allied torpedoes, which used spread spectrum and frequency hopping technology to defeat the threat of jamming by the Axis powers. Although the US Navy did not adopt the technology until the 1960s, the principles of their work are now incorporated into modern Wi-Fi, CDMA, and Bluetooth technology, and this work led to their induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014.

    Via forgottenhollywood.com
  10. 10. A Nobel laureate in Physiology or Medicine who developed a multitude of new drugs, using innovative research methods that would later lead to the development of the AIDS drug AZT.

    thefamouspeople.com
    Hilde Mangold
    Gertrude B. Elion
    Anne McLaren
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Gertrude Belle Elion developed several new drugs to treat life-threatening diseases like leukemia, autoimmune disorders, urinary-tract infections, gout, malaria, and viral herpes.

    Via pinterest.com
  11. 11. She won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work in the field of X-ray crystallography and in 1969, she deciphered the structure of insulin.

    rsc.org
    Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin
    Alice Hamilton
    Gerty Cori
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin's life as a researcher began when she received a chemistry book containing experiments with crystals as a child. She went on to successfully determine the structure of penicillin in 1946 and, in 1956, also the structure of vitamin B12, which has the most complex structure of all vitamins.

    Via pharmaceutical-journal.com
  12. 12. This German mathematician is known for her landmark contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. In algebra, she developed the theories of rings, fields, and algebras and in physics explained the connection between symmetry and conservation.

    thefamouspeople.com
    Rosalyn Sussman Yalow
    Emmy Noether
    Charlotte Auerbach
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Emmy Noether was described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, and Norbert Wiener as the most important woman in the history of mathematics. In physics, Noether's theorem explains the connection between symmetry and conservation laws.

    Via pinterest.com
  13. 13. This physicist’s research helped discover the nuclear fission reaction in uranium but did not share the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for nuclear fission that was awarded exclusively to her long-time collaborator Otto Hahn.

    mpg.de
    Maria Mitchell
    Maria Gaetana Agnesi
    Lise Meitner
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Lise Meitner, an Austrian-Swedish physicist, worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics. Otto Hahn and Meitner led the small group of scientists who first discovered nuclear fission, however, only Otto Hahn received the Nobel prize for the discovery. In the 1990s, the records of the committee that decided on that prize were opened and her exclusion was called "unjust". Meitner has received a flurry of posthumous honors, including the naming of chemical element 109 as meitnerium in 1997.

    Via azquotes.com
  14. 14. This computer scientists and systems engineer helped develop the on-board flight software for the Apollo space program.

    rejectedprincesses.com
    Anita Borg
    Margaret Hamilton
    Karen Spärck Jones
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Margaret Hamilton, during her time at MIT, assisted in the creation of the core principles in computer programming as she worked on writing code for the world's first portable computer. Hamilton's innovations go beyond the feats of playing an important role in getting humans to the moon. Hamilton challenged the male dominated technology field to allow women to enter these STEM fields for many years to come.

    Via robomatter.com
  15. 15. The only woman to receive an unshared Nobel Prize in the Physiology or Medicine category. She discovered genetic transposition and showed that genes are responsible for turning physical characteristics on and off.

    Wikipedia
    Mary Putnam Jacobi
    Anna Wessels Williams
    Barbara McClintock
    Correct!
    Wrong!

    Barbara McClintock, during the 1940s and 1950s, developed theories to explain the suppression and expression of genetic information through the study of maize plants. Due to skepticism of her research, she stopped publishing in 1953. McClintock's research became well understood in the1970s, as other scientists confirmed the mechanisms of genetic regulation that she had demonstrated in her maize research decades ago.

    Via izquotes.com

Do You Know These Women In STEM?

Beginner of Women in STEM!

Thank you taking this quiz! GWISE invites you to learn more about women's achievements at the "In Memoriam Vera Rubin: Women in STEM Poster Exhibition Event" which will be held from 11.30 am to 2.30 pm on May 7th, 2017 at SAC plaza, Stony Brook University! To win exciting prizes, tag GWISE's Facebook page or send an email to sbu.gwise@gmail.com and you will be entered into our raffle! Winners will be announced at the poster event.

Beginner of Women in STEM!
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Student of Women in STEM!

Congratulations on your great performance! GWISE invites you to learn more about women's achievements at the "In Memoriam Vera Rubin: Women in STEM Poster Exhibition Event" which will be held from 11.30 am to 2.30 pm on May 7th, 2017 at SAC plaza, Stony Brook University! To win exciting prizes, tag GWISE's Facebook page or send an email to sbu.gwise@gmail.com and you will be entered into our raffle! Winners will be announced at the poster event.

Student of Women in STEM!
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Expert of Women in STEM!

Congratulations on your amazing performance! GWISE is pleased to announce that you are eligible for exciting prizes at the "In Memoriam Vera Rubin: Women in STEM Poster Exhibition Event" which will be held from 11.30 am to 2.30 pm on May 7th, 2017 at SAC plaza, Stony Brook University. To claim the prize, tag GWISE's Facebook page or send an email to sbu.gwise@gmail.com.

Expert of Women in STEM!
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