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    25 Incredible Japanese Desserts That, IMO, Beat Just About Every Other Dessert Out There

    They're typically not overly sweet — at least compared to some traditional American desserts — and many of them are easier to make than you think.

    Japanese desserts are classic, versatile, and contain some of the most universally accessible recipes out there. (In fact, you may have already tried your hand at a few of these!)

    They're typically not overly sweet — at least compared to some traditional American desserts — and many of them are easier to make than you think. From taiyaki and mille crepe cakes to purin and kasutera sponge cake, here are all the classic Japanese dessert recipes you should try at home. If I missed your favorite, leave it in the comments!

    1. Matcha Roll Cake

    Fork in matcha swiss cake roll with a heavy serving of cream filling.
    humblebeanblog.com

    No coffee break is complete without a slice of this matcha roll cake, which is light and delicate, and melts in your mouth. Don't be alarmed if you finish the entire roll in a day. 

    Recipe: Matcha Roll Cake

    2. Taiyaki

    Group of Taiyaki pastries laying on a patterned cloth on top of a plate.
    pickledplum.com

    You might be aware of this dessert from its popular pairing with ice cream. Turns out, the fish-shaped pastry was served without ice cream for a very long time before the ice cream hybrid went viral. To make this recipe (which, to be clear, tastes nothing like fish), you'll need to get a taiyaki pan. Just consider it an investment into the funnest snack/party favor you'll want to show off for years to come. 


    Recipe: Taiyaki

    3. Fluffy Japanese Pancakes

    Syrup drizzling over a knob of butter placed on a stack of two fluffy Japanese pancakes.
    tasty.co

    If you're looking for the jiggliest, fluffiest pancakes in the world, you've come to the right place. You'll want a hand mixer to beat the egg whites into stiff peaks, but other than that, this recipe — and the best Sunday brunch ever — is yours for the taking. 


    Recipe: Fluffy Japanese Pancakes

    4. Dark Chocolate Terrine

    Long rectangular brick of chocolate terrine with one slice laying on its face.
    matchaandtofu.com

    Chocolate terrine is by origin a French flourless chocolate dessert that's become popular in the Japanese food world. This recipe uses mascarpone cheese in lieu of the usual cream. Since chocolate is the overpowering flavor, try to find an especially high-quality kind. 


    Recipe: Dark Chocolate Terrine

    5. Matcha Mille Crepe Cake

    Dusted matcha mille crepe cake with a protruding slice showing the creme filling.
    justonecookbook.com

    Don't worry: You won't need to make a thousand layers for this mille crepe cake. But you will need a lot of patience and an entire afternoon to carefully create and stack the layers of this gorgeous matcha dessert. 


    Recipe: Matcha Mille Crepe Cake

    6. Dorayaki

    Two halved dorayaki sandwiches, showing their red bean fillings.
    justhungry.com

    This pancake "sandwich" is traditionally made with sweet azuki bean paste, which is widely used across East Asian desserts. It's the perfect snack or sweet breakfast.


    Recipe: Dorayaki

    7. Kabocha Shiruko

    Thick sweet porridge with three lumps of shiratama rice dumplings.
    humblebeanblog.com

    This sweet porridge is made using kabocha, coconut milk, and condensed milk, and is swimming with firm but chewy rice dumplings (also known as shiratama). It's a comforting and not-too-sweet dessert that people of all ages can love. 

    Recipe: Kabocha Shiruko

    8. Purin

    Japanese pudding in shallow bowl with caramel sauce drizzled over it.
    chopstickchronicles.com

    This recipe may call for just a few simple ingredients (eggs, milk, sugar, and vanilla), but it does involve careful observation and timing so you don't overcook the egg mixture. You'll be rewarded with an elegant, tasty dessert that'll impress all your dinner guests.


    Recipe: Purin

    9. Kasutera Sponge Cake

    Slices of fluffy Kasutera sponge cake.
    cookingwithdog.com

    Also known as Castella, this moist sponge cake is an essential pastry found in most East Asian bakeries, but especially Japanese ones. It's lightly sweetened with honey and sugar, and has a soft, pillowy texture you could really sink into.


    Recipe: Kasutera Sponge Cake

    10. Green Tea Mochi

    Eight boxes - two columns and four rows - that show all the steps to making a mochi ball.
    izzycooking.com

    Highly chewy and sticky, these mochi rice balls are fun to eat and even easier to make. Just mix together glutinous rice flour with sugar, green tea powder, and water to get the dough started. Then, flatten it out into equal circular shapes. Fill it with red bean paste, and pinch the ball closed to finish. Ta-da!


    Recipe: Green Tea Mochi

    11. Chakin Shibori Sweet Potato With Cinnamon

    Dense chakin shibori topped with black sesame seeds.
    kyotofoodie.com

    You'll need Japanese sweet potatoes for this dessert, but the result is a delicious, crumbly, dense dessert that you'd never guess uses potatoes as its base. 


    RecipeChakin Shibori Sweet Potato With Cinnamon

    12. Strawberry Shiratama Dango

    Bowl filled with Shiratama Dango balls and sliced strawberries, drizzled with condensed milk.
    okonomikitchen.com

    Shiratama dango is a mochi dessert usually served in a bowl and drizzled with condensed milk or served with ice cream for flavor. Like most mochi recipes, it's straightforward to make, so don't be shy.


    Recipe: Strawberry Shiratama Dango

    13. Chocolate Cake Roll

    Two slices of dense chocolate swiss roll cake on a clean plate.
    indulgewithmimi.com

    As you might've realized, you can personalize Swiss cake rolls however you want, whether it's with matcha flavor, or, as in this version, double chocolate flavor.


    Recipe: Chocolate Cake Roll

    14. Matcha Pound Cake (Vegan)

    Slices of matcha pound cake laying on top of wire cooling rack.
    chefjacooks.com

    Fun fact: Pound cake named as such because the original recipe called for one pound each of butter, sugar, eggs, and flour. This recipe is vegan and replaces the butter and eggs for sesame oil and baking powder, but you'll still get the same soft, sweet bread you can enjoy all day long. And by the way, you can browse through all of Chef Ja Cooks' recipes for vegan takes to tons of classic Japanese recipes. 


    Recipe: Matcha Pound Cake (Vegan)

    15. Sweet Potato Yaki Mochi

    A fresh serving of sweet potato yaki mochi topped with black sesame seeds, with a fork pulling out a piece to show its dense core.
    okonomikitchen.com

    These panfried sweet potato mochi totally redefine how to incorporate sweet potato into desserts, proving once again what a versatile vegetable it is. Oh potato, what can't you do?


    Recipe: Sweet Potato Yaki Mochi

    16. Strawberry Shortcake

    chopstickchronicles.com

    A classic Japanese shortcake is made with airy sponge cake that pairs perfectly with fluffy whipped cream that just barely weighs down the cake. Use the freshest, ripest strawberries for the best result.

    Recipe: Strawberry Shortcake

    17. Sweet Black Sesame Soup

    Bowl holding a serving of sweet black sesame soup.
    okonomikitchen.com

    This might not be a soup in the traditional sense, but it does have all the makings of a nutty, sweet, and filling dessert. For an extra lil' something, feel free to top it with a few chewy mochi.  


    Recipe: Sweet Black Sesame Soup

    18. Shokupan (Milk Bread)

    Shiny loaves of milk bread.
    chopstickchronicles.com

    This is the pillow soft, not-too-sweet bread to end them all. And like most good breads, you'll need to commit at least a day to getting the perfect bread. But if you're a true bread aficionado, have you ever known a good bread that's not worth the wait?

    Recipe: Shokupan (Milk Bread)

    19. Matcha Tiramisu

    Tiny wooden spoon scooping up a bit of matcha tiramisu from a wooden box.
    matchaandtofu.com

    You won't need any lady fingers for this tiramisu, but you will need a ready-made chocolate sponge cake that you can either buy or make at home. 

    Recipe: Matcha Tiramisu

    20. Candied Sweet Potatoes

    Fresh candied sweet potatoes topped with black sesame seeds.
    okonomikitchen.com

    Japanese sweet potatoes have such a caramelly taste that they're perfect on their own. This recipe levels them up with a glaze made of sugar and soy sauce. 

    Recipe: Candied Sweet Potatoes

    21. Cream Pan

    Several loaves of cream pan stuffed with cream.
    princessbamboo.com

    For the best cream pan, make sure the ratio of cream to bread is at minimum, half and half. You won't regret it.


    Recipe: Cream Pan

    22. Melon Pan

    Loaves of melon bread textured with a criss-cross pattern laying on a cooling rack.
    justonecookbook.com

    This bakery mainstay might not taste like melon, but it's just as sweet and textured, with a crispy crust that makes every bite a delicious experience. 

    Recipe: Melon Pan

    23. Coffee Jelly

    Glass with coffee jelly topped with whipped cream.
    onolicioushawaii.com

    This refreshing treat can be purchased in many Japanese shops or whipped up at home with just a few ingredients. It's the perfect pick-me-up after a summer meal in the backyard.  

    Recipe: Coffee Jelly

    24. Fluffy Cheesecake

    Fluffy cheesecake
    tasty.co

    Unlike a dense American cheesecake, a Japanese cheesecake is known for its jiggly and airy texture, achieved by whipping eggs and baking it in the oven using a water bath. Serve with powdered sugar or some fresh berries on the side. 


    Recipe: Fluffy Cheesecake

    25. Mitarashi Dango

    Three mochi skewers covered in a sticky sweet soy glaze.
    sudachirecipes.com

    "Dango" come in several varieties, but always involve sweet rice dumplings. In this variation, they're served in a skewer and coated with a sweet soy glaze. 


    Recipe: Mitarashi Dango

    What's your favorite Japanese dessert? Share in the comments!