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    Posted on Oct 13, 2017

    Here's Exactly How To Make A Fussy Baby Stop Crying

    This is pretty genius.

    It's a look that every parent knows all too well: the dreaded ~Baby Cryface~.

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    It's inevitable. And loud!

    But Dr. Robert Hamilton, a California pediatrician for almost 30 years, has a quick trick to stop these mini meltdowns. He calls it "The Hold."

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    He first posted a YouTube tutorial on the technique a few years back — and he told BuzzFeed that it continues be super popular and relevant among new parents.

    Here's how the whole thing works:

    First, approach the crying baby. 😭

    Pick them up — and fold their right arm over their chest...

    Then fold their left arm over their right one.

    Hold those arms in, then move your other hand to their lil' baby butt...

    And give it a booty shake! 🍑

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    Then gently bounce the baby around a bit, at a 45 degree angle.

    And boom — problem solved! No more tears.

    But WHY does it work? 🤔

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    According to Dr. Hamilton, it's because of the quick POV change. "This isn't a position that babies commonly find themselves in," he told BuzzFeed.

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    "By putting them in a new or novel position, you're changing their focus and almost overwhelming them," he explained.

    "It's causing them to reflect and think, 'huh, this is different!'," he said. "And that's usually enough to stop the crying."

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    Dr. Hamilton also says the position itself is important — because babies have a natural reflex to want to flail their arms out. So holding their arms in is the first step to curbing that reflex, and comforting them.

    One thing to note, though? All babies are different, so this trick won't on work on everyone. (It also won't work, he says, if the fussiness is caused by a more concrete issue — like if your baby is hungry or not feeling well.)

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    Dr. Hamilton also says that the technique works best for babies under three months. After that, they either get too heavy, or the novelty wears off.

    But he estimates that his success rate with babies in his office is "around 90%" — and a quick scan through the comments on the video shows lots of parents vouching for this trick working on their babies. (Psst... it worked for mine, too!)

    Watch the full video here:

    View this video on YouTube

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