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Can You Finish Off These Science Headlines?

"Ravens have paranoid, abstract thoughts about other ________."

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  1. 1. What is missing?

    New Scientist / newscientist.com
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    The story was based on a paper out in the journal Scientific Reports about a zebra shark that switched from sexual reproduction to "parthenogentic" reproduction –where an embryo forms without the need for fertilisation.

  2. 2. What is missing?

    Tech Times / techtimes.com
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    The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The researchers found that a type of slime mould could transfer things they'd learnt to other individuals through a process called cell fusion.

  3. 3. What is missing?

    Wired / wired.co.uk
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    The story is based on a paper in the journal Nature Communications that showed ravens take into account the "visual access" of others, by guarding their things when a peephole is opened – so someone outside could see them – but not when it is closed.

  4. 4. What is missing?

    The Atlantic / theatlantic.com
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    The story was about the record number of Americans – over 18,300 – who applied to become astronauts in NASA's latest round of recruitment.

  5. 5. What is missing?

    BuzzFeed / buzzfeed.com
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    The story is based on a paper in the journal Nature about the fossil of a 540 million-year-old, millimetre-long creature that was found in northwest China.

  6. 6. What is missing?

    Scientific American / scientificamerican.com
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    I'm sorry but Curiosity is never coming back. NASA is, however, trying to figure out what's called a sample return mission that would involve bringing rocks from the red planet to Earth. Its 2020 rover will cache a sample and keep it on Mars, ready to be picked up by a later spacecraft and delivered to scientists on Earth for testing.

  7. 7. What is missing?

    NPR / npr.org
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    In the journal Science scientists report a new kind of adhesive, inspired by slug slime, that could be used in the future to stick together biological tissues.

  8. 8. What is missing?

    The Atlantic / theatlantic.com
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    The story is based on a paper out in the journal PNAS. The researchers found that humpback whales learn new songs "verse by verse", mixing them with old songs during the transition period.

  9. 9. What is missing?

    Audubon / audubon.org
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    The story is based on a paper in the journal Nature Communications in which researchers did a "biogeochemical" analysis to track past penguin populations on Ardley Island in Antarctica. They found that large eruptions of the nearby Deception Island volcano nearly wiped out the colony, and it took hundreds of years for it to recover.

  10. 10. What is missing?

    Engadget / engadget.com
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    A paper in Nature Astronomy describes how scientists at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US simulated the conditions on icy giants like Neptune by shooting lasers at polystyrene, creating nanodiamonds just a few nanometres wide. The scientists say the diamonds created on the real planets would probably be bigger.

Kelly Oakes is science editor for BuzzFeed and is based in London.

Contact Kelly Oakes at kelly.oakes@buzzfeed.com.

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