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13 Things You Didn't Realize Were Bad Manners In Other Countries

Like any Brit, the all-new Jaguar XE is exceptionally well-mannered. Here are some international faux pas to help you remain composed in any situation.

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1. In Venezuela, it's considered rude to show up early or even on time.

Punctuality is interpreted as greediness. Show up 10 to 15 minutes late to be on the safe side.
Jon Feingersh / Getty Images

Punctuality is interpreted as greediness. Show up 10 to 15 minutes late to be on the safe side.

2. In Italy, it is considered a faux pas to drink a cappuccino after a meal.

Save it for breakfast — they believe consuming milk later in the day or after a large meal will upset the stomach.
Buena Vista Images / Getty Images / 581021375

Save it for breakfast — they believe consuming milk later in the day or after a large meal will upset the stomach.

3. In Mexico, it's considered rude for a waiter to bring your bill before you ask for it.

Planning on dining out in Mexico? Practice "la cuenta, por favor," or you might be waiting awhile.
Peter Adams / Getty Images

Planning on dining out in Mexico? Practice "la cuenta, por favor," or you might be waiting awhile.

4. Don't give knives, scissors, or other sharp objects as gifts in the Netherlands.

They're considered unlucky in Dutch culture.
Giorgio Fochesato / Getty Images

They're considered unlucky in Dutch culture.

5. In Japan, it's best never to place your chopsticks upright in rice.

This is how rice is presented during funeral rites and is considered bad luck.
Cultura Exclusive/Sofie Delauw / Getty Images

This is how rice is presented during funeral rites and is considered bad luck.

6. In some places such as India, Sri Lanka, the Middle East, and Africa, it might be best not to eat or pass food with your left hand.

The left hand is associated with uncleanliness. Southpaws who visit should either attempt to use their right or get used to the occasional side-eye by locals.
Kevin Clogstoun / Getty Images

The left hand is associated with uncleanliness. Southpaws who visit should either attempt to use their right or get used to the occasional side-eye by locals.

7. Don't pour your milk in before your tea in England.

There's no way to know the strength of the tea by sight. BUT the subject is so hotly debated, you'll either get disparaging "oh, you're a milk-before-the-tea type of person" or "oh, you're a milk-after-the-tea type of person" comments no matter what you do... (Good luck.)
Betsie Van Der Meer / Getty Images / Via gettyimages.com

There's no way to know the strength of the tea by sight. BUT the subject is so hotly debated, you'll either get disparaging "oh, you're a milk-before-the-tea type of person" or "oh, you're a milk-after-the-tea type of person" comments no matter what you do... (Good luck.)

8. In France, it's bad luck to cross over someone else's drink as you are toasting.

Also, you should make eye contact with each person you toast. (Pro tip: Say "à votre santé" — or "to your health" — to really impress the locals.)
EschCollection / Getty Images

Also, you should make eye contact with each person you toast. (Pro tip: Say "à votre santé" — or "to your health" — to really impress the locals.)

9. In Canada, it's customary to take your shoes off when you enter someone's home.

It's just the polite thing to do.
Bushturkey Studio / Getty Images

It's just the polite thing to do.

10. In China, one should probably avoid giving a gift with the number four in it.

The Chinese word for four (四 sì) is very close to the word for death (死 sǐ).
Blend Images / Getty Images

The Chinese word for four (四 sì) is very close to the word for death (死 sǐ).

11. In Samoa, it's considered rude to refuse food.

Make sure you head to a meal hungry.
Blaine Harrington III / Getty Images

Make sure you head to a meal hungry.

12. In Denmark, one should never take the last of any food item off of a plate.

Take small parts of it until only crumbs are left.
Buena Vista Images / Getty Images

Take small parts of it until only crumbs are left.

13. In China, it's best to leave food on your plate as a gesture of gratitude toward your host's generosity.

They might continue to refill your plate should you empty it.
Photography by Daniel Frauchiger / Getty Images

They might continue to refill your plate should you empty it.

The all-new well-mannered Jaguar XE.