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This Is What Happens When A Flock Of Birds Collide With A Passenger Jet

Amir Hashin, a procurement and inventory specialist for EgyptAir, told BuzzFeed News that "bird strikes are common occurrences at airports around the world".

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The bird strike took place on Friday evening during landing at London's Heathrow airport, leaving the nose of the EgyptAir Boeing 737-800 stained with blood and smothered in feathers.

The plane, which was carrying 71 people from Cairo, landed safely and no passengers or crew members were injured.

"Nothing serious took place or affected the safety of both passengers and crew, the jet landed safely at the airport," an EgyptAir spokesperson confirmed to the Evening Standard.

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Amir Hashin, a procurement and inventory specialist for EgyptAir's maintenance and engineering department, took a photo of the damage the following morning and shared it on his Facebook page.

Facebook: amir.hashim

Hashin told BuzzFeed News that "bird strikes are common occurrences at airports around the world".

He said the reason a tiny bird could cause such damage to a passenger jet of this size is because the nose of the plane is made from a lightweight material, similar to fibreglass.

"That's not very strong material," Hashin said. "And with the speed of the jet and the size of the bird it can make such damage."

The passenger jet was grounded for 21 hours while it was repaired and returned to Cairo the next day, the Evening Standard reported.

BuzzFeed News has contacted EgyptAir for comment.

Fiona Rutherford is a reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in London.

Contact Fiona Rutherford at fiona.rutherford@buzzfeed.com.

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