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Peaches Geldof's Widower Spoke About The "Traumatising" Moment He Found Her Body

Thomas Cohen gave a heartbreaking interview to mark the third anniversary of her death. He spoke about the trauma it caused and how their young children are coping.

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Peaches Geldof's widower, Thomas Cohen, 25, has given a rare interview to mark the third anniversary of her death from a heroin overdose.

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Peaches was found lifeless in the home she shared with Thomas and their children, the youngest of whom was there when she died and alone with her body for eight hours.

At Peaches' inquest in 2014, it was revealed she had heroin, codeine, methadone, and morphine in her bloodstream. Drug paraphernalia including spoons, tights, and a syringe were found hidden in a box of sweets next to her body, and she was also in possession of high-grade heroin.

Peaches died aged 25 in April 2014, leaving behind their two sons Astala, 5, and Phaedra, 4. In the interview, Thomas lamented the fact that the boys have now lived most of their lives without her.

Speaking to German newspaper Bild, Thomas said:

They have lived longer than they knew their mother. They were just 1 and 2 – now they are 4 and 5. I think the most important thing is to give them stability and safety by losing their mother so early. Of course their mother is one of the most important people in their lives. That's why we show them photos every few weeks. I tell them: "This is Peaches, your mother, and she is no longer with us."

Peaches, whose own mother Paula Yates also died from a heroin overdose when Peaches was 11, had relapsed from two and a half years of methadone therapy and began to inject heroin again in February 2014.

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Thomas confirmed at the inquest that Peaches was having weekly drug tests, which she maintained were coming back clean – something he believed at the time. He also confirmed he had no knowledge of there being drugs in their home, and that he believed she'd hidden them in the loft.

The last post on Peaches' social media, hours before her death, was a photo of her with her mother.

He said:

She was an amazing mother. And then the big house in the country, the dogs, the cat. All this was an attempt to fill the hole. In the end it was not enough. In retrospect, I think she thought the children would close the gap. But that just does not work. Heroin is a drug where you're trying to enforce something on you which is greater than life. But it's horrible – you're filling your body with something that's killing you.

He said:

When I found her, I was not surprised. I thought to myself at the moment: "Yes of course – you had to do that." About an hour after I found it, it was time for the kids' lunch. They needed their lunch. So I took the children's chairs to the table, took the yoghurt out of the fridge, the bananas. After that we drove here [his parents' house] escorted by the police. The routine I had to keep up with the children helped me a lot. It was incredibly traumatising – so deeply traumatising – and it's the sort of thing people can't really return from – that moment.

He said:

There is always hope, even in the greatest grief. You must not let yourself be eaten by grief or transfer it to your children. It takes a while, but now we can look forward. I want them to be happy – I don't care what they end up doing. And they are miraculously having happy childhoods, which hopefully will lead to happy, fruitful lives.

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