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These Photos Of Sisters With Albinism Will Change Your Idea Of Beauty

Brazilian photographer Vinicius Terranova wants to tackle beauty standards and cultural diversity.

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"Flores Raras," which means "rare flowers," began last year as a way for Vinicius to explore beauty standards and cultural diversity.

"The initial proposition is still open and it consisted of creating symbolic imagery (like the one featuring the twins linked by their braided hair) in a series of artistic portraits that kept their documental essence," Vinicius told BuzzFeed.

Vinicius' photos aim to spread a very important message: Everyone is beautiful in their own unique way, and they should learn to embrace that.

Instagram: @viniciusterranova

"Our ethnic, cultural, and physical diversity are like variations of the same flower. Some may adapt better to winter and others to summer, but all of them, despite their particularities, share basic needs such as receiving and sharing love," Vincius told BuzzFeed.

And he wants people to remember that life itself is a beautiful thing.

"To be alive is infinitely least likely to happen than winning the lottery, and realizing our rareness is the climax of this lucky plot. Without our differences we would only be grains of sand."

Vinicius will continue to highlight people with "special features" and sought out models with conditions such as albinism and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in his work.

"Flores Raras discusses self-esteem, not only in the exterior level but our interior rarities also," he said.

And if you're in love with the Bawar sisters, good news, he plans on working with them frequently.

"Their talents are clear. They're very creative, intelligent, and in-tune! They're aware of the power they have to inspire, and know how to build the atmosphere you need for each shoot. Although they're very young, the twins Lara and Mara already understand very well the importance of the work they're doing, and how their self-confidence has been helping many people around the world. Along with their older sister Sheila, they've also spread a message of love and respect for differences."