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13 Dishes That Aren't Actually Mexican

So you're totally convinced that your dinner last night was an original Mexican recipe? Think again.

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1. Fajitas

Although delicious, its origin goes back to the mid 30s in Texas.
Flickr: sanctumsolitude

Although delicious, its origin goes back to the mid 30s in Texas.

2. Margaritas

Margaritas were first mentioned in My New Cocktail Book (1930) by G. F. Steele.
Flickr: samsmith

Margaritas were first mentioned in My New Cocktail Book (1930) by G. F. Steele.

3. Burritos

Although its origins go back to Ciudad Juarez during the Mexican Revolution, Los Angeles' El Cholo Spanish Cafe served the first restaurant-style burrito in the 1930s.
bhofack2/bhofack2

Although its origins go back to Ciudad Juarez during the Mexican Revolution, Los Angeles' El Cholo Spanish Cafe served the first restaurant-style burrito in the 1930s.

4. Chimichangas

This deep-fried dish has roots in two places: Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona. Either way, neither one of them is Mexico.
Regina H. Boone/Detroit Free Press / MCT

This deep-fried dish has roots in two places: Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona. Either way, neither one of them is Mexico.

5. Taquitos

In 1934, Aurora Guerrero served these fried tacos at her restaurant Cielito Lindo in Los Angeles.
Via commons.wikimedia.org

In 1934, Aurora Guerrero served these fried tacos at her restaurant Cielito Lindo in Los Angeles.

6. Hard Shell Tacos

The recipe for hard shell tacos first appeared in the 1914 English language cookbook California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook.
mikafotostok/mikafotostok / Via commons.wikimedia.org

The recipe for hard shell tacos first appeared in the 1914 English language cookbook California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook.

7. Nachos

Spontaneously made by Ignacio "Nacho" Anaya in the bordertown of Piedras Negras in Mexico, they were first served to the wives of U.S. Army officers during World War II.
debstheleo/debstheleo

Spontaneously made by Ignacio "Nacho" Anaya in the bordertown of Piedras Negras in Mexico, they were first served to the wives of U.S. Army officers during World War II.

8. Queso

This authentically Texan dip was inspired from melted cheese dips in Chihuahua, Mexico.
MSPhotographic/MSPhotographic

This authentically Texan dip was inspired from melted cheese dips in Chihuahua, Mexico.

9. Rosca de Reyes

This pastry commonly used to celebrate Los Tres Reyes Magos (Three Wise Men) on January 6. Although popular throughout Mexico and in hispanic communities in the U.S., this pastry is actually from Spain.
Via commons.wikimedia.org

This pastry commonly used to celebrate Los Tres Reyes Magos (Three Wise Men) on January 6. Although popular throughout Mexico and in hispanic communities in the U.S., this pastry is actually from Spain.

10. Churros

Churros actually go all the way back to Ancient China with a salty dish called youtiao. The Portuguese took this dish and introduced it to Europe, replacing the salt with sugar. Eventually, the Spaniards introduced the churro to Mexico during the Conquistador era.
Via commons.wikimedia.org

Churros actually go all the way back to Ancient China with a salty dish called youtiao. The Portuguese took this dish and introduced it to Europe, replacing the salt with sugar. Eventually, the Spaniards introduced the churro to Mexico during the Conquistador era.

11. Tapatio Salsa Picante

The beloved Tapatio Salsa Picante with the iconic charro on the bottle is actually from Maywood, CA.
Via ebay.com

The beloved Tapatio Salsa Picante with the iconic charro on the bottle is actually from Maywood, CA.

12. Tostitos

These mandatory party pleasers were actually made by Frito-Lay in 1978.
Dwight Burdette / Via commons.wikimedia.org

These mandatory party pleasers were actually made by Frito-Lay in 1978.

13. Taco Bell

This one goes without saying.
Via commons.wikimedia.org

This one goes without saying.

Correction: Links in the captions for #1 and #2 have been changed to more accurately credit sources.

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