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Views, Emotions, And Sounds - The Films Of Mani Ratnam + A.R. Rahman

There have been many director + music director combos in the history of the Tamil Film Industry, let alone the whole Indian Film Industry. But on August 14th, 1992, the film world in general was changed forever, with "Roja." Throughout the past 25 years, we have been in awe of the visuals that have been brought forward by Mani Ratnam and his team, through the music and sounds that A.R. Rahman has helped create. Within this span of 25 years, 13 film collaborations have been made between the two (18 if you were to count the simultaneously shot multi lingual films, the movies that were remade, and the films that Mani Ratnam has contributed in terms of production/writing). As a film enthusiast, watching the films that they have collaborated has been a real treat. Their films are one of the main reasons why I love tamil films and music. Some of their films are stronger than the others in this list, but each one of them has a bunch of positives that we will look into with this retrospective. So here it is, a look at their history together, so far.

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ROJA (1992)

Madras Talkies

After the success of Thalapathi (1991), Mani Ratnam decided to change his famed collaboration with Illaiyaraaja, to a newcomer by the name of A.R. Rahman. Most of the industry was curious, as the top director in the country, along with the producer who just so happened to be one of the field's greatest directors (K.Balachander), were working with a new musician with no previous film experience. Little did they know, a music storm was about to be formed.

Roja is a film of many shades, and for a first time music director like Rahman, the film was an opportunity to bring a range of sounds. Whether it be the natural rustic sounds of the village sequences, the love sequences between Aravind Swamy and Madhoo, or the political sequences in Kashmir, Rahman brought his musical charm and Ratnam brought his trademark visuals to the forefront. Speaking of Madhoo, her performance in the film is just outstanding. She goes from being an innocent village girl to being a distressed (but very determined) wife that gets separated from her husband after he is taken hostage. The scene of her in the jail talking to the war criminal is a perfect example of how Ratnam is able to get the best out of his actors.

But the key thing that matters in the film is that it doesn't feel like a first time collaboration. Taking on a subject like Kashmir politics and interweaving it into a love story is something very difficult to do, but the two of them do so in a brilliant fashion. One sequence that really stands out to me is the climax snowbank/bridge sequence. What could have gone as an over the top scene is done with a simplicity, with Rahman's paced BGM matching Ratnam's artistry. Post the release, Roja has been one of the most celebrated tamil films to ever have been released, winning plenty of awards for both Ratnam and Rahman, and even having the soundtrack included in "Time" magazine's greatest of all time list. And with this film, the movie industry saw the start to a beautiful friendship.

Pick of the soundtrack: Tough to choose, but the one song that always seems to stand out whenever I see the film is Chinna Chinna Aasai: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dT99bwT8io

Fun fact: Originally, Ratnam offered the lead role to cinematographer Rajiv Menon.

Thiruda Thiruda (1993)

Madras Talkies

Every great filmmaker attempts something new and out of their comfort zone in their careers. In this case, Ratnam was delving into the comedy genre for the first time. Though his previous films did have feature comedic scenes, Thiruda Thiruda would be the first movie which would have comedy as one of it's main elements. What also made the film intriguing was that it was the second film in the Rahman - Ratnam combo. Expectations were sky high with all the success that came with Roja. Thiruda Thiruda wasn't the huge success that Roja was, but the film ended up being a great experience nevertheless. In terms of action, this might be the first movie which shows the "blockbuster" side of Ratnam. Chase scenes feature prominently in the film, as Ratnam raises the stakes in terms of production and scope.

Rahman also raises his game, delivering songs that vary from each other. One unique song happens to be Rasathi, which is done in acapella, something that is almost rare to see from a rising music composer, let alone a tamil music composer. Another song, Thee Thee, is just something else, even when you listen to it today. The amount of energy and power in the composition is something to behold, especially when you consider that this was just Rahman's second year in the industry. As for the film itself, it seemed like after making a serious subject in their first collaboration, the duo wanted to make a more lighter film for the second go around. To be honest, it was probably the best decision to do. Thiruda Thiruda is just a fun film to watch, and sort of an interesting one to watch, as it is Ratnam's most "commercial" film in his career thus far.

Pick of the soundtrack: A diverse soundtrack, but the pick has to be the biggest song to come out of the film, Konjam Nilavu: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uj_18hXo5G0

Fun fact: Ram Gopal Varma helped write the story for the film.

Bombay (1995)

Madras Talkies

When you think of the greatest Pan Indian films, Bombay will undoubtedly be among the films in that list. A tamil film that, like Roja, was able to connect with audiences across India and around the world. Though during its release it sparked some controversy and news, the film is one that has stood the test of time, being regarded as some of the best work Ratnam and Rahman have done in their respective careers. Played to standing ovations (and riots), Bombay told the love story of a Hindu man and a Muslim woman, against the backdrop of the Bombay riots. Aravind Swamy and Manisha Koirala give career defining performances through this film. Ratnam's direction definitely shows, as both deliver so much in terms of emotion. His trademark of having short dialogues play a key factor in the film too, as it helps make some sequences (especially the riot sequences) very realistic and relatable.

But what really makes Bombay so memorable is the impact that Ratnam's visuals have alongside Rahman's music. There are countless scenes which the two excel in. Whether it be the memorable and impactful climax scene, the song Uyire, the scenes of the blossoming love between the two characters, or the scenes of family conflict because of their forbidden love, Ratnam and Rahman just seem to click with ease. Many of these scenes could have gone melodramatically, but the both of them understood the right amount of exposure and depth that they need to provide to make the scenes believable. And this is why Bombay will always be regarded as one of Ratnam and Rahman's most daring collaborations. It's one of those movies that you need to watch for yourself to understand the impact that it would have. Considering there are stories of cinema audiences giving standing ovations at the end of the picture back when it released, you can tell why they might have done so when you watch the film. Bombay is a perfect example of a film that transcends the art form and able to touch the spirit of humanity.

Pick of the soundtrack: The theme. And what a theme it was: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vhDnk8ZWlpE

Fun fact: Vikram was originally supposed to play the lead role, but had to leave the production due to a clause for another film contract which forced him to not change his look.

Iruvar (1997)

Madras Talkies

After another huge success, Ratnam and Rahman joined together to create Iruvar. Though Nayagan will forever remain in many eyes as Ratnam's greatest work, if there was a vote for what could be another option in terms of his greatest work, a lot of people might put Iruvar as that other option. This was Ratnam's tribute to cinema and politics, and in a way, and one his most well crafted film in all facets of filmmaking. An intense film delving into the lives of two determined men. They meet, take over the cinema industry, and in the process become political rivals as they enter into politics. Though many will look back at Iruvar as the film that introduced one of the most famous Indian's in history, Aishwarya Rai, the film offers so much more. Iruvar provides an interesting look into the world of film and politics (with the story based on the lives of MGR and Karunanithi). The film provided movie goers with a behind the scenes look at how film and politics go hand in hand. What also makes the film so amazing is the standout performances done by Mohan Lal and Prakash Raj. Ratnam's direction and way of making the two actors perform so effortlessly is the reason why the friendship turned rivalry is so captivating to watch on screen.

Iruvar also offered Rahman his first instance of doing a historical movie with Ratnam's direction. We get to witness Rahman's create music that goes through the early golden period of tamil cinema, giving us glimpses of how he would interpret the music of that time period. Even the songs that are composed for the soundtrack remind us of the music that the great Viswanathan created for MGR during that time. The BGM of the film shows the huge range Rahman had begun to develop. The powerful theme music that is mixed with Rahman's vocables being a big highlight and something that would pop into anyones mind years removed from watching the movie. There is one scene that really stands out, and I can consider one of the greatest scenes in film history. For those who haven't seen Iruvar, I will spare you the big details, but once you to get to the point of the movie where both the main characters are on the rooftop looking down at a crowd, you will understand why I consider the scene so great. A trademark Ratnam film.

Pick of the soundtrack: I'm picking the song that I would say is a fitting tribute to the legend that was MGR, Aayirathil Naan Oruvan: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDVURADK_QI

Fun fact: Madhavan, Kamal Hassan, Sathyaraj, Nana Patekar, Aravind Swamy, and Mammootty were just some of the actors that were considered for Prakash Raj's role.

Dile Se.. (1998)

Madras Talkies

If there is one way to describe Ratnam's debut Hindi venture, it would be with one word, poetic. Visually one of Ratnam's most striking features, the film was coupled with Rahman's insanely catchy (and haunting) score. Based around the 7 shades of love in ancient arabic literature, Dil Se.. is a film that seems to be made to help push visuals as the key rather than the story. Don't get me wrong, the story is beautiful and very impactful. But whenever I think about the film, its always the visuals that come up first. The cinematography is some of the best in any Ratnam film, and that is thanks to the work of the legend Santhosh Sivan. Shadows and light are key in many of the scenes in the film. He shows why he's one of the greatest indian cinematographers through this film.

Rahman's score compliments the intense nature that Ratnam brings forth. The film is considered the finale in Ratnam's "Terror Trilogy" which also consists of Roja and Bombay. For a director's first Bollywood film, you can even say that the film is a little risky, going away from the norms that are usually found in traditional Bollywood films. I would even go far as to say that it is the most versatile performance in Shah Rukh Khan's long and historical career. There is something different in his performance in this film, and it seems the emotions come naturally. His casting in the film allows us to feel for his character, considering he simply is able exude charisma without even trying. His character goes through a pretty damaging and hard journey through the film, definitely one of Ratnam's more "tortured" film characters. A definite must see for any fan of cinematography and poetic films.

Pick of the soundtrack: The energetic song that helped catapult Preity Zinta to stardom, Jiya Jale: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwoSBP_GiuQ

Fun fact: The song "Chaiyya Chaiyya" is considered to be one of the most popular Bollywood songs of all time, even being included in a top 10 songs of all time poll conducted by BBC.

Alaipayuthey (2000)

Madras Talkies

After Mouna Ragam, Ratnam never really made an out and out romance film. Considering that film came out in 1986, to see Ratnam go for another take at a full length romance film after directing 3 consecutive hard hitting films was interesting to see. Little did anyone know, the combo was about to give one of the greatest modern day takes on love and marriage. From the get go, the film was full of youthful spirit. There was the casting of newcomer Madhavan, alongside the ever youthful Shalini, along with the always brilliant PC Sreeram re-teaming with Ratnam for the first time in years. What would follow is an intense modern day love story.

Alaipayuthey is a story about young love, how that love blossoms to marriage, and how that marriage will go through so so much. It's really hard to imagine the film with different lead stars, as they are the reason why the film gets an extra push. Madhavan and Shalini really make us believe in the love that the two characters have for each other. Considering how much their characters go through, the ending scene of the film in the hospital really makes it even more satisfying. Ratnam and Rahman are in tune throughout the duration of the film. Each stage of the characters' love is just handled so youthfully, traditionally, and maturely.

But in terms of visuals, and the music that goes with the visuals, hands down Alaipayuthey is the best work the two have done together. It seemed like a daunting task to outdo the visuals and music in Dil Se.., but Alaipayuthey is able to one-up that film's look. In fact, the visuals for the songs alone are some of the greatest shot visuals that tamil cinema might ever see. The amount of variations Ratnam is able to get Sreeram to capture in terms of colour in Pachai Nirame is just astounding. The movie came out nearly two decades ago, yet it still looks much better than half of the films that are made today. Rahman adds so much elements with his score. Each scene is just tightly wrapped with his music, that if you were take away his score, the impact of the scene would definitely be lost. A definite favourite of many romance genre lovers, and a movie that is almost essential to watch on Valentines Day.

Pick of the soundtrack: Nothing will ever match the colours and sound that they were able to blend to create the masterpiece, Pachai Nirame: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uknl5lNwtnk

Fun fact: Though the film helped push Shalini to being one of the top actresses in the field, she retired from acting after the release of this film.

Kannathil Muthamittal (2002)

Madras Talkies

A film that personally holds a special place in my heart (this film was the reason why I wanted to visit Sri Lanka when I was younger), Kannathil Muthamittal deviates a little from Ratnam's usual openings. We are treated to a prolonged prologue showing the story of a young woman in Sri Lanka. She gets married, builds a relationship with her husband, and then ends up getting separated from him (whom we end up learning is a part of the war). The first 15 minutes or so of the film is vintage Ratnam and Rahman. Both splendidly portray the beauty, struggle, and life that the people in the war torn section might be going through. Rahman's "Vellai Pookal" speaks with such peace and quietness that you feel the yearning for peace on earth from his voice and the story that is displayed on screen.

Though you might say the film is a war film, I would technically categorize it as a film for humanity. Ratnam extracts some top notch performances from the cast of the film. Madhavan and Simran deliver career defining performances as the parents of Amutha. And then there is Nandita Das, who plays the role of Amutha's biological mother. She delivers so much in the amount of screen time that she is in. She features prominently only in the beginning and the end of the film, but she leaves a mark on you with the amount of range she brings. Finally there is Amutha, played by P.S. Keerthana. For a child actor, she brings so much to the film. Ratnam was able to bring out an amazing performance from her, and it's quite a shame we never got to see her act in another movie.

There are a lot of amazing instances throughout the film: the young Amutha who is in constant search for her biological mother once she finds out that she is adopted, any of the fight sequences, or the heartbreaking sequence of Amutha finally meeting her mother. In all of these sequences, Ratnam's visual sense is definitely a force to reckon with. But when you watch the movie, it seems as though he also allows Rahman to take over the scenes as well. Its almost a mix of two emotions. The visuals are tough to take in and so emotional, while the music is melodious and soft. The film ended up being one of their most critically acclaimed work together, and deservedly so.

Pick of the soundtrack: The yearning for peace, Vellai Pookal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5Km0VbQ3jg

Fun fact: Though a major portion of the story happens in Sri Lanka, no scene was actually shot in Sri Lanka. Sets were made in India to replicate the country.

Ayutha Ezhuthu/Yuva (2004)

Madras Talkies

The political pictures Mani Ratnam directed before his first simultaneous shot multi lingual film were mostly based on the politics of the older generation. What made Ayutha Ezhuthu/Yuva so unique is that Ratnam and Rahman tapped into the youth of today, with their angst and views on the political scene. An anthology film showcasing three different youth in three different spectrums of society, both language films did an amazing job at showing how the youth of today can help change politics. It's interesting that, though the films weren't huge blockbusters when released, over time, they both have gained huge followings, even to some extent, helping shape up the current political scene within society today. The films are pretty daring to say the least, as usually youth films are more geared towards the fun times that young people have or the adventures that they might take. Ayutha Ezhuthu/Yuva are just the total opposite.

If each Ratnam film had a theme, then these projects would be under the theme of hope. Hope, optimism, and motivation for a better tomorrow. Whether it be Rahman's motivating and chant worthy background score, or his ability to tap into the way youth look at love and enjoy life, these projects in particular helped allow both Ratnam and Rahman to paint a different picture of how youth are portrayed on screen. All three of the characters and their stories show youth that are determined at what they want to follow through on, something that sometimes other filmmakers fail to seem to be able to capture. I consider Ayutha Ezhuthu/Yuva to be the most underrated Ratnam films in his career. It seemed like they were made ahead of their times. But that's the beauty of his and Rahman's work sometimes. They always seem to be one step ahead, and we're just catching up to them.

Pick of the soundtrack: The fury of the youth, the passion to do good, Dhakka Laga Bukka/Jana Gana Mana: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S47Bwfix9Io / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gTFzbP4Ks0

Fun fact: Esha Deol is the only cast member that appeared in both films.

Guru (2007)

Madras Talkies

Like Iruvar, Guru was a year spanning historical drama. And like Iruvar, Guru also used a real life personality for inspiration. In this case, the film was loosely based on the life of Dhirubhai Ambani. It's an interesting film in capturing one man's desire to become a big and successful businessman, even though he goes up the ladder with some blemishes. Ratnam and Rahman provide a very mature look and feel for the character throughout the duration of the film. The songs and score are very classy and nostalgic inducing. Showing the many shades of a businessman's life might get boring, but both Ratnam and Rahman keep the pace of the film steady, avoiding it from getting boring.

Out of all the movies the two have done together, Guru seems to be the one that is the most mature and most straightforward. The film kind of feels like a business plan in a way, following a step by step process and not trying to go over the top or deviate from the plan in any way. In terms of performances, Ratnam provides the real life couple of Abishek and Aishwarya an opportunity to perform with a lot of character progression. We see their characters go through a lot, whether it be the marital struggles that are faced in business or the health issues that Abishek's character goes through near the end. Also helps when the supporting cast includes the likes of Mithun Chakraborty, Madhavan, and Vidya Balan, whom help give the film more depth. Guru is another solid entry in the Ratnam and Rahman duo's filmography.

Pick of the soundtrack: One of Ratnam and Rahman's best duet songs, Tere Bina: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JDSGhhiOwI

Fun fact: This was the first film Ratnam had shot outside of India, filming some scenes on location at Turkey.

Raavan/Raavanan (2010)

Madras Talkies

If there was one thing that Ratnam always seemed to touch upon and recall, it was historical/religious texts. Finally, he got the chance to explore the story of Raavana from Raamayana. His second multi lingual film, Raavan/Raavanan explored the famous story, shining new light into the character and myth that was Raavana. You can say that these might have been the most adventurous films that Ratnam has directed in his career. With the biggest budget that he has ever had for a film that he directed, Ratnam assembled a great cast and crew to deliver the modern day telling of the famous story. The film saw a return for Aishwarya Rai in tamil, and also saw Ratnam finally teaming up with Vikram for both versions of the film. Many people lauded the films technical aspects, considering it to be one of the best shot and best produced films in his career. But its the performances of Vikram and Aishwarya that stand out in both versions. Ratnam helps guide both actors to deliver very multi layered performances in both versions of the film. In my opinion, both actors deliver some of their best dramatic performances in their careers through these films, as they show the range and amount of ability they possess.

With the adventure and natural vibe that Ratnam brought to screen, Rahman's music also helped provide extra layers to the gritty nature of the film. The score and songs all featured an "earthy" feel, which some might consider as Rahman's most "raw" album. The songs feel tribal and powerful, but are delivered in modern packaging. If there is one take away from both films, is that the finale might be one of the most impactful in recent Indian cinema history. The lighting, setting, dialogues, Rahman's melodious BGM that turns into a tribal pulsating fury, the performances by the actors and the poetry of capturing the elements of Raamayana are all on full display in the finale. The ending song hits you hard, and the way the movie just fades to black shows how Ratnam and Rahman understand the power of film. Probably one of the more darker films in tone and presentation that the two have done together.

Pick of the soundtrack: The finishing touch to the film, entering sadness, Naan Varuven/Jaare Ud Jaare: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSK4BYWWY5U / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7nryWapjCw

Fun fact: Following the theme of Ramayana, Vikram/Abishek Bachan's character doesn't touch Aishwarya Rai's character until the moment before he dies.

Kadal (2013)

Madras Talkies

Kadal might be the weakest film in this combo, but the film does deliver on some fronts. For one, the supporting performances from Arjun and Aravind Swamy shine brightly in the film. It's nice to see Aravind Swamy back to acting after his hiatus from cinema. He always seems to be able to emote a lot without doing too much. It's also cool to see the "Action King" Arjun perform a villain role as well. This might be the only Ratnam film where the supporting characters actually outshine the main characters in the film. Rahman's songs and BGM's are amazing as usual. What's incredible about the music in the film is that it almost feels like you're transported to the area, hearing and feeling what it would feel like to be in the christian coastline community. Cinematography by Rajiv Menon is another major plus. The way he captures the coastline, bringing the colours of the water and scenery are just amazing to see. Kadal follows Ratnam's previous film in showing the beauty and aura of nature. I consider this film and his last project as an unofficial "natural duo-logy." Kadal also follows Ratnam's unique ability to use religious source material and incorporate it into his stories, with the Bible being the main source material this time. In terms of repeated watching, Kadal is the only Ratnam film that I have never watched more than twice. I guess it just never connected to me in the way the other films in this list do.

Pick of the soundtrack: Just like a breeze on the coastline, the relaxing and soothing, Moongil Thottam: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQ783EHQkng

Fun fact: The lead pair of Gautham Karthik and Thulasi Nair both made their film acting debuts in the film. Gautham's father (Karthik) and Thulasi's mother (Radha) also made their film debuts together for the film Alaigal Oivathillai.

OK Kanmani (2015)

Madras Talkies

Without a doubt, this film might be the happiest in this retrospective. Sure there are some dramatic moments and an emotional moment here and there, but what made the film so great is its approach to love. Deep down, love is basically just something that is joyful and full of spirit. Sure you will have the downs, but the ups are what we live for. And that is exactly what the main characters are able to show through the brilliance of Ratnam's direction. Its honestly amazing to see a director being able to bring new breath to the romantic genre whenever he decides to do a full length romance film. For a director well into his third decade in the industry, it's amazing to see him being able to direct the way a young director would direct a modern day love story.

If Mouna Ragam was a mature love story, and Alaipayuthey was a film about the life and times of a couple loving through the various up and downs, then OK Kanmani is a testament to today's generation. The generation of seeking instant joy, but a generation that also yearns for the yesteryear views on love. The main stars of Dulquer Salmaan and Nithya Menen help bring that youthful feel to the proceedings. They bring life to every scene, and the much needed energy to make the film work. Both actors are very talented for their age, and both seem so comfortable while performing. That is where Ratnam's directional magic happens, as he shows how the two characters just become more and more infatuated, while also making them progress in terms of characterization.

Rahman's music also plays a key factor in the film. The story is very simple and something that we've seen time in and time out, but the way he compliments Ratnam's direction of the story is very pleasing to hear. The score is very modern with twists of the past. There is EDM and Carnatic elements. There is fast paced western sounds, and then there is the beauty of South Indian traditional sounds that bring a light hearted touch to the album. This would be the hybrid score that Rahman has made for Ratnam. The duo's knowledge in what from the past you can add into the present is what makes this film so nice to watch. OK Kanmani is probably the breeziest watch in the duo's filmography.

Pick of the soundtrack: The blissful, energetic, and youthful track, Aye Sinamika: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhCYfOiDUEw

Fun fact: Ratnam and Rahman made their debuts as lyricists' for the song Mental Manadhil.

Kaatru Veliyidai (2017)

Madras Talkies

Brilliant/Raw/Real. This is a movie that will grow on with time. Ravi Varman has given some spectacular imagery. A.R. Rahman's score and songs are just magical. Karthi and Aditi Rao Hydari both portray so much shades in their characters. Karthi plays the anti-hero. Someone that tamil cinema always seems to not be able to show properly: a tamil hero that is very flawed emotionally. Also, what a debut in tamil for Aditi. She has so much range and so much emotions. Reminds me of a young Manisa Koirala. Even the supporting characters of Rukmini Vijayakumar and RJ Balaji are really etched well. Mani Ratnam is, and still remains, a genius. I know there will be a lot of you that might not like the movie because its not your typical tamil romance film in terms of presentation or way the story is told. But this is what real relationships could be like. Ego plays a huge factor in them, and Ratnam shows that with great scope and honesty. There might be shades of Alaipayuthey and Bombay in the movie, but I'd say Kaatru hold its own in terms of delivery. I guarantee this will become a cult classic later on, just like how Iruvar, Dil Se.., and Ayutha Ezhuthu have become. A tamil movie made for a wider, global, audience. Poetry on film

Pick of the soundtrack: Fun, cool, full of life, and just a happy song to hear, Azhagiye: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlvJN3GvG9o

Fun fact: Karthi, who was an assistant director for the film Ayutha Ezhuthu, stars as the main lead in Kaatru Veliyidai.

  1. What's your favourite Ratnam + Rahman film?

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    Roja
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    Incorrect
    Thiruda Thiruda
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    Incorrect
    Bombay
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    Iruvar
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    Dil Se..
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    Incorrect
    Alaipayuthey
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    Kannathil Muthamittal
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    Ayutha Ezhuthu/Yuva
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    Guru
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    Incorrect
    Raavan/Raavanan
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Kadal
    Correct
    Incorrect
    OK Kanmani
    Correct
    Incorrect
    Kaatru Veliyidai
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What's your favourite Ratnam + Rahman film?
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    Roja
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    Thiruda Thiruda
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    Bombay
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    Iruvar
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    Dil Se..
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    Alaipayuthey
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    Kannathil Muthamittal
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    Ayutha Ezhuthu/Yuva
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    Guru
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    Raavan/Raavanan
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    Kadal
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    OK Kanmani
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    Kaatru Veliyidai

If you liked the article, follow me on instagram @birithivy to catch my views on film and the musical side that I have.

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