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Bill Shorten Smashes Tony Abbott In The City 2 Surf

Clear eyes. Full hearts. Can't lose.

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Labor leader Bill Shorten beat former prime minister Tony Abbott by nearly four minutes during Sunday's City 2 Surf race in Sydney.

While neither will be challenging Usain Bolt for the title of world's fastest man any time soon, Shorten ran the 14km course in 1 hour 18 minutes and 25 seconds, a few minutes faster than Abbott's 1 hour 22 minutes and 14 seconds.

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Shorten was raising money for suicide prevention charity R U OK?.

His fellow Labor frontbencher Canberra MP Andrew Leigh also hit the pavement on Sunday morning, but finished 25 minutes ahead of his boss.

The Labor leader is on track to hit his target of 2000km in 2016: so far he's dashed more than 1250km in cities across the country.

Shorten had an average pace of 10.5km per hour in his first City 2 Surf, crossing the finish line 13,841st (out of 67,634 competitors).

You can check out his stats
City2Surf / Via live.tiktok.biz

You can check out his stats

Race veteran Abbott crossed the finish line one minute quicker than his 2015 time.

Great to do another City to Surf with Nathan and the NSW Police Legacy team! #City2Surf

He acted as a guide for visually impaired triathlete Nathan Johnston, something he's done since 2013, raising money for the NSW Police Legacy team.

The former prime minister finished 17,660th overall, and 1,161st of men aged 50 to 59, with an average pace of 8.26km per hour.

His results are here.
City2Surf / Via live.tiktok.biz

His results are here.

Shorten says the comments during the election about his "man boobs" encouraged him to take up running after a 15-year sabbatical.

The Labor leader says he now sympathises with the pressure on women and the negative impact body image comments can have."I've been conscious of body image issues for a long time and witnessing what young women put up with. I guess it was interesting to be on the receiving end of some of the debate. It gave me greater empathy," he told Fairfax."From outdoor advertising through to television advertising I see how it perpetrates stereotypes and puts pressure on young people, boys and girls about their body image. It's not healthy."
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The Labor leader says he now sympathises with the pressure on women and the negative impact body image comments can have.

"I've been conscious of body image issues for a long time and witnessing what young women put up with. I guess it was interesting to be on the receiving end of some of the debate. It gave me greater empathy," he told Fairfax.

"From outdoor advertising through to television advertising I see how it perpetrates stereotypes and puts pressure on young people, boys and girls about their body image. It's not healthy."

Alice Workman is a political reporter for BuzzFeed News and is based in Canberra.

Contact Alice Workman at alice.workman@buzzfeed.com.

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